Do you think I can make a college drumline?

DelcoBaseballStar

Junior Member
Hey guys! This is my first thread on this forum (and first thread period!). Well I'm now a senior in high school, and I've decided that I want to play in a college drumline. Here are the college marching bands that I want to play in:

-The Penn State Blue Band
-The University of Delaware marching band
-The Mighty Sound of Maryland (University of Maryland)
-The Temple University Diamond Band

Here's why I'm wondering:

-I know most of the rudiments by heart
-I know all four rudimental groups (Rolls, Diddles, Flam Rudiments, and Drag Rudiments)
-I can't mark time and play at the same time
-I'm still learning traditional grip
-I'm having trouble with the triple stroke roll and inverted flam taps

...So what do you think my chances of making a college drumline are?
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Well,two things.Do you play in a drum line now?If so,I assume your director could make a more accurate evaluation.If your a newbie,as I suspect,you as they say,have bigger fish to fry.As a senior who lives in PA.your sights should be set on Penn State,for a few reason,beyond drumming.

One of my daughters went to Penn State,so I know its a great school,in one of the safest towns on earth.You can major in quite a variety of subjects,and as a state resident,your tuition is half of what an out of stater pays.

Its also not an easy school to get into,as most good schools are,so extraciricular school activities,and community service are actually required of candidates,

I know you may love drumming,but your talking about higher education,and the rest of your life.I may be wrong,but I haven't heard of anyone earning a living playing in a drum line.I'm not trying to dash your dreans here,but you should make your school selection,based on a different criteria.Best hopes and wishes.:)

Steve B
 

DelcoBaseballStar

Junior Member
Penn State is actually my first choice school. I love the campus, the location, the size, the band (of course :D), the in-state tuition haha, the energy, and the social life of the campus! I did very well for my junior year of HS. My overall GPA was a 3.6, and I'm going to take the ACT in September, so I'm pretty sure I can get in. Plus, my high school is one of the best Catholic schools in my county and whole Archdiocese of Philadelphia, I participate in a lot of extracurriculars, and they might consider my PA residency and the fact that I'm a minority (I hate that they consider my race for admissions, but whatever), so they might accept me for those reasons. My plan is to major in Economics and take my medical school prerequisites so that I can become a doctor and have the knowledge to make smart investments in the stock market and maybe start a few small businesses. I never planned to make money drumming, it was just going to be an activity to be involved in while in college. And to answer your question about my drumline experience: I've been playing since I was a freshman. Plus, I've been taking private lessons for about 2 years now. So you never crushed my dreams with that post because my real dream is to graduate college and med school, become a doctor, get married, and raise a nice family
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Here's why I'm wondering:

-I know most of the rudiments by heart
-I know all four rudimental groups (Rolls, Diddles, Flam Rudiments, and Drag Rudiments)
-I can't mark time and play at the same time
-I'm still learning traditional grip
-I'm having trouble with the triple stroke roll and inverted flam taps

...So what do you think my chances of making a college drumline are?
I don't think that a triple stroke roll or inverted flam will keep you from being accepted into marching band. Even marking time will be something that you can work on.

The big question (which tmadrum asked but you didn't answer) is if you have any experience in marching band - or even concert band. There is no substitute for playing in an ensemble situation. If you don't have ensemble experience, see if you can sign up for your high school concert or marching band. You may want to seek out performing opportunities in local community bands as well.

Also, in your list of qualifications, you did not mention reading. How well can you read musical notation?

If you do not make the snare line, would you be content to play cymbals or play in the pit?

Jeff
 

DelcoBaseballStar

Junior Member
I'm a part of my school's drumline, concert band, and percussion ensemble. Over the years, I wasn't that bad of a reader but not a good one, but this summer I've gotten some key concepts. Now I understand rests (My biggest pet peeve in music) and I can count WAYYY better than I could this year or any other year. And I did it just by looking at my music and studying it. Overall, I just understand more Music Theory than ever. And I would be content on the cymbals, but probably not in the pit. I want my face to be seen around campus haha, but hopefully with enough practice I will be on the snare, tenor, or a bass drum (My junior year instrument).
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
I'm a part of my school's drumline, concert band, and percussion ensemble. Over the years, I wasn't that bad of a reader but not a good one, but this summer I've gotten some key concepts. Now I understand rests (My biggest pet peeve in music) and I can count WAYYY better than I could this year or any other year. And I did it just by looking at my music and studying it. Overall, I just understand more Music Theory than ever. And I would be content on the cymbals, but probably not in the pit. I want my face to be seen around campus haha, but hopefully with enough practice I will be on the snare, tenor, or a bass drum (My junior year instrument).
It sounds like you are on the right track. Keep working at it. You may want to take some private lessons off someone who specializes in marching percussion. And remember to use ear protection. Kevlar heads and marching cymbals are loud!!!

Jeff
 
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