Do you have any OCD-type traits about your drums/set-up?

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I don't think I've ever heard of not playing on the logo before.

I just have so many questions about that. Surely your cymbals have stick marks on the logo. No?

What happens if you do play on the logo?

What if somebody plays your cymbal with your stick and hits the logo?

Fascinating.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I always line up the label on the drum head so it appears on top of the drum when it's set up, so it can be read. I was taught to do that at the drum shop I worked at in high school, and that always stuck.

Everything else is whatever. One thing I took from PIT is just play, and don't get too stressed about how stuff is set up. At PIT you spend so much time jumping on a kit to perform, you don't have time to make sure everything is perfect. And then over the years, I've sat in on so many different kits, had to use house kits at rehearsals, gigs, etc, I just learned to adapt.

I'm sure, I have my preferences, and I need my seat height to be in a certain spot. But other than that, I can adapt quickly to what ever the set up is.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
A question about the logo on the batter side of the bass drum. Does this have to be the same orientation as the reso head? If it is, with Evans heads, the seam of the aluminum collar is at noon, right above the logo, so the ugly seam is front and center when the logo is top dead center. So on the batter I rotate it to the point where the seam doesn't show. The seam bothers me slightly. So the batter logo is close to 6:00. I understand the logo on the reso head needs to be perfect, and the logo trumps the aluminum hoop seam on the reso collar, but on the batter where no one sees the bass drum logo, doesn't the seam bother anyone? To the point of rotating the batter head?
 
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GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Bass drum logo level, snare release at the 9 o'clock position, bass and hihat pedals on the same line. Niether one ahead of the other.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Logos on snare heads are always at 12 o'clock when I'm sitting behind the kit.

Ride has to be at the perfect height and angle. Same with snare otherwise playing just doesn't feel right.

Snares are always off when not playing, that's not really OCD just means snare aint buzzing like crazy when you're not on stage and there's music being played, Carl Palmers bro Steve got me into that same with hi hat clutch.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
A question about the logo on the batter side of the bass drum. Does this have to be the same orientation as the reso head? If it is, with Evans heads, the seam of the aluminum collar is at noon, right above the logo, so the ugly seam is front and center when the logo is top dead center. So on the batter I rotate it to the point where the seam doesn't show. The seam bothers me slightly. So the batter logo is close to 6:00. I understand the logo on the reso head needs to be perfect, and the logo trumps the aluminum hoop seam on the reso collar, but on the batter where no one sees the bass drum logo, doesn't the seam bother anyone? To the point of rotating the batter head?
I always mount my bass drum batter head upside down so the logo is hiding behind the pedal.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
...snare release at the 9 o'clock position...
Would this be considered OCD? I kinda like knowing where the snare release is. If at 7 or 8, it interferes with my left knee. If at 6, it’s really tough to engage/ disengage. Anything else and you’d be a left handed drummer.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
I think there are enough 12-6 guys out there to make it worth mentioning. I actually prefer 12-6 with the throw off at 6 if I'm playing band/orchestral snare drum, but on the kit throw off at 9 is my standard.
 

Stroker

Platinum Member
I can relate to everyone's OCD quirks, in fact a good solid 95% of all that has been mentioned applies to myself. Always been OCD to a degree but find it's progressing with age.

One OCD quirk that stands out for me is ensuring legs on all cymbal stands are fanned-out the same, same height, same everything, and to ensure accuracy I get down on all fours and scope each out. No tape measure needed as of yet, but I suspect the tape measure is coming in due time.

For years I associated my OCD with perfectionism, a trait both of my folks possessed, mom being finicky with everything related to cleanliness and organization inside the home, and dad being exacting when it came to building and finishing, however, my mom confirmed that my OCD was already well established when I was a tot, so too early to have been influenced by mom and dads ways.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
Had to think about this one a bit...

I like my stuff to be setup as ergonomically and aesthetically pleasing as the next person, but I share my rehearsal space with two other bands and everyone uses my drums and stands. When I go in, I set up as if setting up for a gig, so there's not enough time to line up every wing nut and whatnot. Once in a while, I'll go in on my own to clean the space and set up my kit from scratch. Then, I take my time and set everything up the way I want it - but that only lasts until the next time I go in.

Now, this is a must: Before I start playing, I have to play with an original pair of sticks, meaning, regardless of which stick I pick up, I have to play with the one that it came with when I bought it. I can tell if they're paired properly just by looking at how far they're worn out. If I drop one during a song, I'll pick it up and swap it back in the next chance i get. All of this is pretty reflexive, I don't really think about it.

I want to first say that Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a real disorder, and this is not a slight on folks who suffer from it. This thread is not meant to make fun of anyone with the disorder as it is debilitating for many folks out there whom we care about and love. I simply couldn't think of a better way to word this as it has become the norm in many vernaculars, so I'm simply using it as a simplified label and is not meant to belittle those who suffer from this.
Well said.

If I may, why not simplify even more and drop "Disorder" from the title? Maybe drop the O, C caps, too.

Or, call it for what it is, which (as WallyY pointed out over in the Vintage Emperor thread) is being anal-retentive. No harm in that, if you're willing to admit it.
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
If we must refer to it as OCD, can we at least re-state it as CDO.

I prefer the letters to be in alphabetical order.

(At least to the extent that we may be able to agree that the letters in the alphabet are written in the correct order...I really don't think W should be where it is.)
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
Would this be considered OCD? I kinda like knowing where the snare release is. If at 7 or 8, it interferes with my left knee. If at 6, it’s really tough to engage/ disengage. Anything else and you’d be a left handed drummer.
I have to have mine at 6 o'clock. Easy to turn on and off, and no chance of knee interference.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
...however, my mom confirmed that my OCD was already well established when I was a tot, so too early to have been influenced by mom and dads ways.
Since you have such an open mind and are mentally very flexible IMO...it might interest you to know that for the first 7 years of life...all a child does is adopt the attitudes and behaviors of those who surround that child. Children are in a constant state of download/programming for the first 7 years, that's their job. That's one reason Rick Beato's son Dylan has perfect pitch. Rick played Dylan very complex music at a really early age, and Dylan's original programming included odd musical intervals and pitches while his language development aspect was going on. This is extremely powerful for good behaviors...and bad...in children. It cuts both ways. You were completely influenced by your parents, assuming you lived with them for the first 7 years. This is fact and is not disputed in the scientific community. You can change your original programming, but it is a very conscious effort. Check out Bruce Lipton's videos if you are interested. He's a great man.
 
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V-Four

Senior Member
Disclaimer: I want to first say that Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a real disorder, and this is not a slight on folks who suffer from it. This thread is not meant to make fun of anyone with the disorder as it is debilitating for many folks out there whom we care about and love. I simply couldn't think of a better way to word this as it has become the norm in many vernaculars, so I'm simply using it as a simplified label and is not meant to belittle those who suffer from this. Thank you.

With that said, I got the idea from the recently-revived zombie thread about matching hardware. I know we all have our little (or big) quirks when it comes to drumming. I get that we all try to be the best that we can be, but do you have any little drumming quirks/OCD-type of habits, rituals, or beliefs when it comes to drumming? Here are a few of mine.

  • On my hi-hats and ride, I try to never play on the logo. I've gotten better about this though.

  • On my drum heads, I always line up the label on the drum head with the badge on the front.

  • On my toms, the badges on my drums have to face forward.

  • I always use some sort of stick wrap on all of my drum sticks. I can't stand playing without it now.

  • I feel like I'm constantly checking the height of the top cymbal of my hi-hats during a show or practice. I think I went way too long with a hi-hat clutch that slipped, and I'm always paranoid of it slipping again.

  • I don't want to admit how long it takes me to make sure a new front logo head on a kick drum is perfectly "level." To those of you out there who spin your logo heads to the side, you are freakin' monsters and should not be trusted. All of you.

  • I mount my rack toms on a snare stand, and one of the arms of the snare stand has to be in the front, centered, and directly under the drum badge. It has to be this way on my practice kit at home as well.

These are just a few of mine. How about you?
This is funny, when I read the title, I was thinkin..nope, I don't have any OCD issues that I can think of, then I read the 1st post and realize that I have almost every single one of these same "issues"..lol.

T.
 

Stroker

Platinum Member
Since you have such an open mind and are mentally very flexible IMO...it might interest you to know that for the first 7 years of life...all a child does is adopt the attitudes and behaviors of those who surround that child. Children are in a constant state of download/programming for the first 7 years, that's their job. That's one reason Rick Beato's son Dylan has perfect pitch. Rick played Dylan very complex music at a really early age, and Dylan's original programming included odd musical intervals and pitches while his language development aspect was going on. This is extremely powerful for good behaviors...and bad...in children. It cuts both ways. You were completely influenced by your parents, assuming you lived with them for the first 7 years. This is fact and is not disputed in the scientific community. You can change your original programming, but it is a very conscious effort. Check out Bruce Lipton's videos if you are interested. He's a great man.
Very interesting, and something I'll be sure to have a look at. Much appreciated, Larry!
 
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