Do You Always Count?

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
The proxy uses multiple servers to bounce your IP masking your actual whereabouts. I've not ventured into the VPN world so I am not inclined to comment on something I'm unclear on.
Okay, so maybe a VPN is like a "encrypted proxy".

I have an encrypted connection to my VPN provider's server in the EU, which then lets me choose another server/proxy to hide under (currently a U.S. server, so I can read the news and click on YouTube links without getting a country-specific blackout warning).

My VPN provider allows me to create profiles which I use to quickly select different servers around the world. I feel like Carmen Santiago sometimes. LOL
 

Paul Blood

Junior Member
My first drum teacher that I studied with for about five years back in the 70s was very strict about counting out loud. We went through the Bellson books “ Modern Reading Text” counting / subdividing every page with a very slow tempo of the metronome while always keeping both feet tapping in unison to the click. My teacher would always drill me on the note values and he’d often get quite frustrated with me, for being a mathematically challenged elementary school kid. Despite his somewhat abusive approach , I’d say I have a strong understanding of rhythmic notation and a good internal clock.

I’d suggest that you keep working on your counting , and eventually research a little bit about the Indian method of counting or vocalizing rhythms which was taught me by Ralph Humphrey- check out his book “ Even in the Odds”. Also jazz players use some very musical ways of vocalizing music, which Steve Houghton covers in his book “ Studio Big Band Drumming”

Good luck!
 
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Paul Blood

Junior Member
This counting thing you speak of is strange to me. All these years go by and I've learned from feel only. Should I change this late in the game?. Counting seems like torture to me but if it helps I'll dig in. I know I'll screw it up though. I can hear my band mates yelling dude! Just go back to your old way.
To me it's something you do in practice, and for the most part when playing in a band you just feel it. It's up to you.... if you're happy with what your doing and not into learning new things, keep on doing what your doing. There's plenty of great drummers that probably never counted anything out....
 

wraub

Well-known member
Notice in this video, around the 2:35 mark- Gina Schock is clearly (sort of) counting, definitely keeping the beat with mouth movements...
Even pros do it, even on camera. ;)

 

Lennytoons

Senior Member
I've found that when I'm trying to figure out a specific beat in a song I start with the bass drum part. Once I get that down a lot of times everything else falls into place.
 

Paul Blood

Junior Member
I had mentioned earlier that my first drum teacher was a "count out loud Nazi". While I did benefit from counting out loud, eventual you have to "set yourself free from the numbers". If you play something that makes musical sense, you shouldn't really have to count. Instead of being 'trapped in the numbers" try to think in musical phrases and forms.

My old teacher Ed Soph (not the "count out loud Nazi") talks about this around the 48;00 minute mark.

 

Paul Blood

Junior Member
I present to you the Indian method of counting, I believe it's called " Ta-Ka-di-Mi" . Please notice that the gentleman demonstrating always knows where the basic pulse is ( what we would probably call the quarter note) . As he is vocalizing his solo, he is clapping out the basic pulse. Enjoy

 

jazzin'

Silver Member
I present to you the Indian method of counting, I believe it's called " Ta-Ka-di-Mi" . Please notice that the gentleman demonstrating always knows where the basic pulse is ( what we would probably call the quarter note) . As he is vocalizing his solo, he is clapping out the basic pulse. Enjoy

The system of counting using these syllables is called Konnakol. Very cool stuff.
 
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