Do other musicians understand that drums can break?

xsarith

Senior Member
So my friends band just released a video, just a quick simple one, but at the end the singer/guitarist and the bassist jump on the drum kit and knock it over and stuff, I literally cringed at it. It wasn't planned either the guitarist/singer just jumped on it and the bassist followed.

Sure it wasn't the greatest kit in the world but it is his kit which hes saved and bought, treat it with respect, I'd be pretty pissed if it was my kit and I'm sure that they wouldn't like there guitars to be jumped on and thrown around.

Sure it looks 'Cool' (personally I think its stupid) and fits with the rock and roll/punk image, which I like as well as the music, but still...

It kinda made me think, do people (including musicians and some drummers) realize that just cause drums are big, made of wood and metal and are constantly hit doesn't mean they're indestructible.

...Or maybe its just me and I'm too much against drum abuse.

Thoughts?
 

inneedofgrace

Platinum Member
I guess I've been fortunate in that no other band members have done anything to my kits other than to occassionally whack a cymbal or two. I don't think they'd be too keen if I grabbed their guitar or bass and started tossing it around the stage.

How old were the musicians in this band? I think the older you get the more respect musicians have for their equipment and others.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
It's a common misperception among most people, not just musicians, not helped by the images that many punk and metal drummers put out there of slamming the drums like they owe them money. Also, the Who, Green Day, and the like have prominently included instrument destruction in their stage acts, and that image has also stuck with many people.

I have a pretty simple prescription for this sort of garbage: If it happens, I walk. But then again, it's never happened to me, maybe because I personally treat my drums well and it looks like I care for them. Some people's kits look like they've been used for target practice; they have stickers and tape all over them; they're dusty and worn-looking. Is it any wonder that their bandmates decide to treat them without respect, when their owner doesn't appear to himself?
 

xsarith

Senior Member
Fortunately for me as well its never happened, however, I have played very few gig, I've never made a video either and my band know how I feel about drums haha.

I've had a friends dad help me one time with my gear (I never asked btw, he was just being nice) but he dropped all my cymbals, only one got damaged which was my china where the edge bent, well bent more than it should anyway. That is really the only thing I've experienced.

There all 17-19 years old, but I also remembered some story's on here though of people coming up on stage and hitting cymbals and stuff, but its not the same as jumping on them, id still get annoyed though.
 

xsarith

Senior Member
It's a common misperception among most people, not just musicians, not helped by the images that many punk and metal drummers put out there of slamming the drums like they owe them money. Also, the Who, Green Day, and the like have prominently included instrument destruction in their stage acts, and that image has also stuck with many people.

I have a pretty simple prescription for this sort of garbage: If it happens, I walk. But then again, it's never happened to me, maybe because I personally treat my drums well and it looks like I care for them. Some people's kits look like they've been used for target practice; they have stickers and tape all over them; they're dusty and worn-looking. Is it any wonder that their bandmates decide to treat them without respect, when their owner doesn't appear to himself?
True, I would agree with the whole image coming from punk and metal drummers (not all though, Im a metal drummer too) as well as the who smashing guitars up, but I don't think people realize that they can replace there instruments easily, normal people, not so much.

I have to agree with the 2nd point too, I pride myself on how well I maintain and look after my kit, some drummers are the same, how ever most drummers I see which are generally metal drummers have some kits in shocking states.
 

NUTHA JASON

Senior Administrator
my lead singer tried to do the jump off my bass drum thing - after the gig i told him that if he did it again it would be our last gig together. i then used his jumper to clean the mud off my rim.
j
 

Lunar Satellite Brian

Senior Member
Personally my band mates are pretty well aware that if they touch my drums they may have whatever part of their body that touched them removed.

But I did see a video of Cage the Elephant's guitarist standing on the bass drum and the drummer was just ignoring it.

in that case in the very least he's going to put the reso bass head out of tune for the rest of the show, that alone would annoy me.
 

NerfLad

Silver Member
As I've said before, one of the only ways to invoke my wrath is to f*** with my gear. Nobody that I've played with has done it. The funny thing is, one band I was in that I eventually quit, the singer did it all the time to the drummer that replaced me, though he never once mentioned wanting to do it when I played with him. Wonder why :)
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
It doesn't look cool at all. It just looks like they are trashy people who have no respect for the other musicians in their band. You notice the they didn't trash their own gear. They know the stuff costs money. I hope your friend fired these creeps immediately after that.
 

xsarith

Senior Member
my lead singer tried to do the jump off my bass drum thing - after the gig i told him that if he did it again it would be our last gig together. i then used his jumper to clean the mud off my rim.
j
That's the exact same reaction I would, jumper and all.

As I've said before, one of the only ways to invoke my wrath is to f*** with my gear.
Same here, I like to think I'm pretty laid back too...

It doesn't look cool at all. It just looks like they are trashy people who have no respect for the other musicians in their band. You notice the they didn't trash their own gear. They know the stuff costs money. I hope your friend fired these creeps immediately after that.
I agree, it looks awful and unprofessional to me, I dunno what happens, I'm pretty sure there still a band and he doesn't mind that stuff happening.
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
Some friends used to play in this bar where "women" would come up on stage and straddle the drummers kick and gyrate. Some would flash him. It was a 20" Pearl masters custom maple virgin kick. Well, maybe not so virgin after that gig. Either it's stronger than I expected or they were lighter than I thought. I couldn't conceive of trying to put any serious weight on a thin shelled quality kick drum. I would think that where the lead singer is standing on the kick as part of some show, the drum is reinforced by stagecraft people specifically for that. And amateurs don't think about what preparation goes into a varsity stage production and just try to copy what they think they see.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
Most ply drums have good compressive strength, so I wouldn't be too concerned about damage unless it was an old three-ply (like my bass drum). With that said, I would probably lump somebody if they did it to my kit. It's the equivalent of spinning a guitar on a strap as far as I'm concerned probably not a problem but you wouldn't dare do it somebody else's gear.
 

xsarith

Senior Member
Yea, I'm from the states. Around here, a "jumper" is someone having a very bad day, or someone with a bungee chord attached to their legs.
I can understand a bungee jumper being called a jumper, but I don't get the bad day though, then again, clothes don't exactly jump on people do they haha
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
I can understand a bungee jumper being called a jumper, but I don't get the bad day though, then again, clothes don't exactly jump on people do they haha
If you're precariously balanced 15 stories in the air on the ledge of a building, wondering whether or not to take that last fateful plunge and end all your woes........I'm gonna argue it's been a pretty bad day.

my lead singer tried to do the jump off my bass drum thing - after the gig i told him that if he did it again it would be our last gig together. i then used his jumper to clean the mud off my rim.
j
Saw a bass player who'd eaten too many pies, do the same thing off the bass drum. Didn't end well. As he bent his knees to spring his fat arse into the air, we could all hear the familiar sound of cracking wood through the bass drum mic. We may have been in stitches, but I don't think the poor sod who owned the kit quite saw it in the same light.
 

AxisDrummer

Senior Member
I get pissed when the bass/guitar player decides to put one foot on the rim of my bass drum while playing. Usually it's the bass player during a great bass/drum line where we're interlocked.

When I had my old set, I let it pass. Day ONE of my new set, I laid down the ground rule of not doing that.
 
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