Distorted Self Awareness

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
I am a fairly new player. I apologize if I say that too much throughout the threads I make, but it is always relevant when asking questions.

I may have an opportunity to play out with a band for the first time. Right now, I can make the choice to go for it or just leave it alone.

my “issue” is that I am afraid that I may have a bad case of “distorted self awarenes”. This is just a term I made up for the lack of a better one. But it’s basically when you’re playing, and really enjoying it, thinking you sound great. But reality says otherwise.

you may feel like you’re killing it, but you listen back and it’s not that great. Micro-timing issues, composition/arrangement mistakes, etc. are more prevalent than you thought than when you were playing.

I have filmed myself playing and it’s not completely terrible but I wouldn’t say it meets my expectations for a live performance, either. I practice a lot and try to clean up the errors I make. Not sure if that eliminates the problem of distorted self-awareness, though.

The event is at a place where I usually play bass. I’m not seen as a drummer but would like to start. I just don’t want to “talk the talk” and not be able to “walk the walk” well, you know?

lastly, yes, I am young and self-conscious. I am fully aware of that but still would like to consult
with the DW community.

Thanks everyone
 

Sebenza

Member
Never waste an opportunity, even if there's chance for failure. The old cliché of "you miss 100% of the shots you don't take", can be applied to playing music with people too imo.

I'd say go for it! If you're worried about those timing issues or arrangement mistakes, just make a conscious effort to keep it simple and groovy. Stay away from grand displays of "look what I can do" and things might just turn out fine.
 

pocket player

Junior Member
I am a fairly new player. I apologize if I say that too much throughout the threads I make, but it is always relevant when asking questions.

I may have an opportunity to play out with a band for the first time. Right now, I can make the choice to go for it or just leave it alone.

my “issue” is that I am afraid that I may have a bad case of “distorted self awarenes”. This is just a term I made up for the lack of a better one. But it’s basically when you’re playing, and really enjoying it, thinking you sound great. But reality says otherwise.

you may feel like you’re killing it, but you listen back and it’s not that great. Micro-timing issues, composition/arrangement mistakes, etc. are more prevalent than you thought than when you were playing.

I have filmed myself playing and it’s not completely terrible but I wouldn’t say it meets my expectations for a live performance, either. I practice a lot and try to clean up the errors I make. Not sure if that eliminates the problem of distorted self-awareness, though.

The event is at a place where I usually play bass. I’m not seen as a drummer but would like to start. I just don’t want to “talk the talk” and not be able to “walk the walk” well, you know?

lastly, yes, I am young and self-conscious. I am fully aware of that but still would like to consult
with the DW community.

Thanks everyone
JUST DO IT !!!!!
 

Thin Shell

Well-known member
The only way we improve at anything in life is doing things that scare us and push us out of our comfort zone. I agree with everyone else. Go for it and look at it as a learning experience. If you approach things that way and not "I have to be perfect" it will be much more enjoyable going in and when you are done you will have at least a few things to work on and hopefully at least a few things that you feel you did well.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Absolutely do it!

Remember that the people/bandmates listening to you will decide whether you're doing well or not, and the self-awareness thing works both ways. You could be viewed as being better than you think you are! But you have to go do it first. :)
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Well go play with them and see what level they are at- you maybe a perfect match and they love you. But if really seasoned musicians you may not last long- but be humble , give at go and ask for input so you can gauge what they want- and this shows them you are eager to learn. I tried out of for bands on band mix and they complimented me being a “really good drummer” which I’m not bad but really good no. Should have been a red flag for the sinking ship waste of time. But then by chance I got in with really good seasoned musicians and did as I just said- I was a piece of clay to mold. Great experience and I still don’t consider myself a musician but now I will claim to be a drummer. Shoulda, coulda, woulda- nothing ventured nothing gained - you may not end up playing with them but they may help you develop if show eager for guidance. People like to counsel, guide, mentor if truly a musician and they see a person eager to learn.
 
I may have an opportunity to play out with a band for the first time. Right now, I can make the choice to go for it or just leave it alone.
Will there be rehearsals? You'll probably know after one meeting with the rest of the band if you'll be somewhat comfortable with it. If you feel mostly confident, definitely do it!
I don't want to talk you out of trying it, but if you're really uncomfortable playing this specific gig, there's no harm in not doing it, too. There will be other opportunities further down the road.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
The Chinese proverb...the longest part of a journey starts with the first step is staring you right in the face. Conjure up the spirit of Evel knieval and get ready for that jump. You'll be just fine young man.
 
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Pootle

Well-known member
Be aware of the adrenaline rush when you get on stage which which will probably make play too hard, too fast, make you tense up or probably all of those things together. Allow yourself the first number or two to settle in, focus on your breathing and the groove. Once the adrenaline tapers off you can knock out the licks. All the other band members will appreciate you locking it in too.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
Would I be correct in assuming that they asked you to join them after hearing you play?
If so, I would say they think you are good enough, so you ARE.
Do it...have some fun...learn.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
You already sound better than most I’ve seen just being as aware as you are. There will never be a perfect performance. Recording and playing back is great for tidying things up. Go for it and have a great time.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
IMO this is a classic example of too much thinking sabotaging the actions. DON'T DOUBT YOURSELF! Do what you think is best going in without hesitation. You judge your actions (or non-actions) afterwards by listening back. In the future is where the changes are made. In the present you are feeling things and not second guessing yourself.

Feel don't think. Feel don't think. Feel don't think. Don't think, feel.

At the audition, don't say anything unnecessary. Don't ask questions for now. Let them ask you questions. Keep quiet. Shut your mouth, turn off your thoughts, and feel the music. Then translate that to your instrument.

You're not the first musician who blocked their own way forward. Step out of your own way, meaning observe and identify the bad thoughts with the intention of eliminating all the bad thoughts that hamstring you.

Assuming no physical issues, ALL drumming problems start in the head. 100% of them. So it's a matter of directing your own thoughts in a constructive...not destructive...manner. It's not that hard once you identify where your thoughts are going off the rails.

Observe your own thoughts from a remote perspective, as if you were someone else, identify the sabotaging thoughts, and eliminate them and replace them with thoughts that will help your cause. Not hurt your cause.

Right now YOU are your own worst enemy. Having no thoughts...is way better than having bad thoughts. You are personally having bad thoughts about the upcoming audition and they must be reversed. Or at the very least neutralized.

Your only true friend...the one that delivers the hard truths...is your recorder.

I got better by subtraction. I'd record myself, and all the cringey parts...I just eliminated them and played time straight through them. It's that simple

No bad parts = all good parts.

Playing time SOUNDS GREAT. It's our first job, period. Don't let anyone, especially yourself, convince you that playing time is boring. Playing time sounds friggin great.

When in doubt, play time.

It's like discovering the fact that yea, I'm working too hard, and the best way to accomplish what I am trying to accomplish...isn't hard! I'M making it hard! I'm changing that from this day forward!
 
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