Discovered rim shots aged 46

huwmc3

Junior Member
30 odd years playing .. I just ‘discovered’ that I hit dead centre and that to be really ROCK I should have learnt to rim shot ... so a New Years resolution to learn how — nearly there now in mid Feb and loving the ear splitting crack - Not 100% reliable but will get there.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
Funny. I've been thinking that I need to learn how to hit the drum more dead center and lay off the rim shots some since that's all I seem to be able to do. I will say I like the sound of them at times and rimshots have a definite use in rock.
 

huwmc3

Junior Member
I think the rimshot is a more technical hit — based on how hard I’m finding it - at least at low volume. I’m working on the premise that if I can do it at low volume reliably, then at full chat it will work all the time —- or I’ll sound like a random snare sound generator .. 🤔
 

Flaflaflafla

Junior Member
Is there a good example of effective rimshots in a song? I’ve never really understood how it’s different (‘better’) than just hitting the snare harder. Honestly I can’t even tell when they are being used, which may be part of my problem.
 

Supernoodle

Senior Member
Two Princes is a good example... it gets really extreme and fun on a piccolo. Am new to rimshots too, got to about 95% consistency after a couple of years, using trad grip (angling snare away is essential!)

David Garibaldi calls them a drumset rudiment. Really good to have them available as a sound option...

Edit: another favourite - Just A Gigolo, what a slammer!
Not sure if they were actually recorded using rimshots but playing live definitely makes it very much sound like it
 
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opentune

Platinum Member
Is there a good example of effective rimshots in a song? I’ve never really understood how it’s different (‘better’) than just hitting the snare harder. Honestly I can’t even tell when they are being used, which may be part of my problem.
off top of my head,
....or Superunkown, or quite a few Red Hot Chili Peppers songs as well.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Is there a good example of effective rimshots in a song? I’ve never really understood how it’s different (‘better’) than just hitting the snare harder. Honestly I can’t even tell when they are being used, which may be part of my problem.
Rimshots introduce the shell tone to the final resolved sound. The shell tone dominates the head tone when a rimshot is used. Sonically, there is a clear difference between a head shot and a rim shot. Most of my hits are rimshots, just for the tone. It's my default stroke/tone. I have to focus on NOT hitting the rim in songs that call for it.

I play rimshots because I like the tone much better than just head. Just because it says rimshot doesn't mean it has to be loud. Rimshots can be played very gently, my preference, or they can take your head off with the volume if needed. Depending on where the stick tip hits (near the edge, halfway to the middle, just past the middle) gives me different sonic options for my rimshots. If I want the fattest backbeat I can get from the snare, I hit the tip past the center of the head with the stick butt simultaneously hitting the rim. If I want a Bruford-esque tone, my stick tip is near the edge of the head for the wildness and the stick taper is on the rim. I like backbeating with rimshots and ghosting with just the stick tip on the head, no rim. The dynamic and tonal differences between the 2 classes of hits draws the listener in.

If I'm doing a full on shuffle pattern on the snare with my snare hand, I play head only except where the 2 and 4 is. I'll play a rimshot on the 2 and 4 to make the backbeat prominent. It gives a shuffle that "lift".The beauty part is I don't have to hit harder for the backbeat, the rim ups the volume automatically. When I'm fully shuffling my snare with my weaker left hand, it's really helpful not to have to whack it harder on the 2 and 4. It gets tiring. I use the same force on the backbeat as the rest of the pattern and simply employ the rim to provide the extra volume I need for the backbeat. Works like a charm, and it's easier to maintain muscle-wise.

Experiment with rimshots. They allow much more tonal and dynamic options, and very usable ones at that. If I removed them from my playing, I would be removing an entire sonic dimension from my sound.
 
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Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Is there a good example of effective rimshots in a song? I’ve never really understood how it’s different (‘better’) than just hitting the snare harder. Honestly I can’t even tell when they are being used, which may be part of my problem.
pretty much every Police song as well

that is why I hit rimshots all the time...growing up playing along to The Police, Rush, a lot of metal etc...I was tryign to replicate the sounds I was hearing...

it feels weird to not use them now 35 years later.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Rimshots introduce the shell tone to the final resolved sound. The shell tone dominates the head tone when a rimshot is used. Sonically, there is a clear difference between a head shot and a rim shot. Most of my hits are rimshots, just for the tone. It's my default stroke/tone. I have to focus on NOT hitting the rim in songs that call for it.

I play rimshots because I like the tone much better than just head. Just because it says rimshot doesn't mean it has to be loud. Rimshots can be played very gently, my preference, or they can take your head off with the volume if needed. Depending on where the stick tip hits (near the edge, halfway to the middle, just past the middle) gives me different sonic options for my rimshots. If I want the fattest backbeat I can get from the snare, I hit the tip past the center of the head with the stick butt simultaneously hitting the rim. If I want a Bruford-esque tone, my stick tip is near the edge of the head for the wildness and the stick taper is on the rim. I like backbeating with rimshots and ghosting with just the stick tip on the head, no rim. The dynamic and tonal differences between the 2 classes of hits draws the listener in.

If I'm doing a full on shuffle pattern on the snare with my snare hand, I play head only except where the 2 and 4 is. I'll play a rimshot on the 2 and 4 to make the backbeat prominent. It gives a shuffle that "lift".The beauty part is I don't have to hit harder for the backbeat, the rim ups the volume automatically. When I'm fully shuffling my snare with my weaker left hand, it's really helpful not to have to whack it harder on the 2 and 4. It gets tiring. I use the same force on the backbeat as the rest of the pattern and simply employ the rim to provide the extra volume I need for the backbeat. Works like a charm, and it's easier to maintain muscle-wise.

Experiment with rimshots. They allow much more tonal and dynamic options, and very usable ones at that. If I removed them from my playing, I would be removing an entire sonic dimension from my sound.
what he said!!
 

EricT43

Senior Member
30 odd years playing .. I just ‘discovered’ that I hit dead centre and that to be really ROCK I should have learnt to rim shot ... so a New Years resolution to learn how — nearly there now in mid Feb and loving the ear splitting crack - Not 100% reliable but will get there.
I'm like you - I'm 48 and have only recently started focusing on rimshots. They make backbeats sound great. My problem is that I still have a lot of trouble being consistent with them. Sometimes I hit them with too much rim and they don't sound good, and occasionally I miss the head altogether. Consequently, when I play with my band, I don't even attempt them. Not sure how to get there except practice, practice, practice. But I've been practicing them consistently for at least 6 months and still have problems.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
I spent almost all of my 50 years behind the kit playing rimshots only and using traditional grip. I never paid any attention to it. Then, about a year ago, I lost the ability to play rimshots consistently. Now I have to consciously focus on doing so. What happened? I have no idea.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I spent almost all of my 50 years behind the kit playing rimshots only and using traditional grip. I never paid any attention to it. Then, about a year ago, I lost the ability to play rimshots consistently. Now I have to consciously focus on doing so. What happened? I have no idea.

GeeDeeEmm
50 years here as well, andI wonder if you have lost some range of motion in your "frame" up top. I have had to adjust my ride cymbal placement in the last 2 years because of some shoulder issues...little things might not be working as smooth as they used to? There are lots of "independent moving parts" from your shoulder to your wrist...
 
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