Different kinds of cymbals...

\o/

Senior Member
Hi all, i'm pretty new to drumming and i've tried to find a comprehensive list of the differences between cymbals and have comeup with nothing.

Sp can anyone help point me in the direction of the differences? Eg, the differences between ride/crash/etc, how they're most commonly used, how they sound?

Any help much appreciated!
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
The world of cymbals is almost endless.
There are thousands to choose from.
The best way to learn about them is to go to different stores and play as many of them as you can.
A crash cymbal is generally thinner than a ride cymbal.
Ride cymbals are thicker and they make a more defined ping sound.
There are also cymbals that double as both a crash and a ride.
You can crash a ride cymbal and ride a crash cymbal.
There are no rules.
What cymbals you use, and how you use them is personal choice.

There are many different alloys that cymbals are made of also.
There are many different ways to manufacture a cymbal.

Visit the sites of the major cymbal makers and watch the vids on how they make the cymbals.
Listen to the sound samples too.
 

jwildman

Senior Member
Keep in mind this is all how they're are used generally. You can stack cymbals or do all sorts off weird things to them to get the sound you want.

Hihats - played in pairs and controled by a foot pedal. Keep them completly closed to get a chink sound thats good for keeping time and as you open them up more and more, you get a washier, more aggresive sound. Also, while playing other beats, keep your hihat foot bouncing in quarter notes or on the 2 & 4 of measures to keep you in time

Rides - A washy cymbal that (generally) has a bell in the center for a more focused sound. Depending on the thickness of the ride, you can get a more solid ping sound or a washy sound that flows into the drumming. If the cymbal isn't very thick (for instance the Zildjian A Sweet Ride) you can use it for a crash cymbal as well as a ride.

Crashes - More of an accent cymbal. If the crash is thick enough, you can use it as a ride cymbal as well. Also you can play it with a beat the way you would play a ride cymbal beat or hihat beat.

Chinas - Created as a secondary ride for jazz players, china cymbals have grown to be very diverse. You have your aggresive chinas (like the Sabian AAX Xtreme) and then you have your more melodic chinas (like the Zildjian K China). They are like the crashes and are used for accents but can also be used in a beat. Unlike other cymbals, Chinas can be played upside down or right side up, depending on the sound you want.

Splashes - Small cymbals that range from 6 in to 13 in. They are generally thin and again are used for accents but again can also be used in a beat.

Remember that all cymbals vary to suit all types of music.
 

maddrummr

Platinum Member
Manufacturers usually give decent descriptions and sound files of their cymbals. Go on their web-sites and have a listen for yourself and see how the companies describe that sound.
 

ibernalq

Senior Member
The world of cymbals is almost endless.
There are thousands to choose from.
The best way to learn about them is to go to different stores and play as many of them as you can.

There are no rules.
What cymbals you use, and how you use them is personal choice.

Listen to the sound samples too.
Absolutely true.. now for me it doesnt matters mixing brands.. sound rules..
 

braincramp

Gold Member
Manufacturers usually give decent descriptions and sound files of their cymbals. Go on their web-sites and have a listen for yourself and see how the companies describe that sound.
+1 to maddrummr the sites are pretty good..personally I prefer going to youtube, memphis drum shop or my cymbal.com (I think there 1 in the same) they play all types on a drum set so really get a good idea what they will sound like doing beats,crashes after rolls ect... I know their site has helped decide alot of my cymbal purchases.
 
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