Different Drum Sounds . Idea's ?

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
The only additives I've ever placed on drumheads are control rings or tape. That was in the days when I used Coated Ambassadors everywhere, which were sometimes more open than I wanted them to be. Now that my snare batter is a Coated P3 (which has a built-in inlay ring) and my bass and tom batters are Coated Pinstripes, I don't use foreign materials at all.

I've never tampered with a cymbal's natural voice. I leave my bronze unburdened.

As for wallets, beads, tambourines, marbles, costume jewelry, fishing tackle, or other assorted props, I don't do that to drums or cymbals. I like to keep things neat and simple.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
I put small children's shoes on my toms and Tammy Faye's makeup case on the snare. It gets that "jesus for the kids" sound everyone clamors for.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
Well?..ok..on my snare I use two squares of toilet tissue folded in half twice. I use 4 small rectangles of duct tape to tape that down at the1:00 position. Years ago..no longer... I used this clear material I purchased at a material store after seeing a road drummer use it. It comes in various weights. I used cymbals to cut it to size. It's like thick suran wrap. This road drummer was playing a ludwig kit without bottom heads yet from the audience his toms sounded full..not the usual attack no reso head sound..yuck. For YEARS this was my secret but I DID let it out now and then.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I have seen people put tambourine jingles on their snare heads

and a recent trend of draping strings of beads; jingles; goat hooves; small woodland creatures etc. on hi hats hhas happened in the past 10 years

I personally don't do any of that now, but back in the day, I had the little thing that Pro Mark made where you could add it to your cymbal stand and it had a string of metal bearings to give a sizzle effect...
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
Some guitar player gave me his broken string. I coiled it up and put it on my high hat. I have it there for about a week, I must like it.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
I'm not averse to modifying drum sounds, but I consider that to be more of a sound effect rather than an enhancement to the drum's sound that I want to hear every time I strike it.

So cymbal rings and tambourine rings that lay on the snare (for example) may sound fine, but not as a steady diet for a whole song. Sure I like the idea of a tambourine hit on every snare backbeat, but it's pretty annoying when it's also there for simple fills or other syncopation.

The Ching-O-Head (c1980) was truly a one trick pony:

_drum_ching-o-head.jpg
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I put small children's shoes on my toms and Tammy Faye's makeup case on the snare. It gets that "jesus for the kids" sound everyone clamors for.
Watch out for mascara. Her lashes could easily penetrate mylar.

Lol I'm having visions of her face stuck to a snare drum!
 

pocket player

Junior Member
Well?..ok..on my snare I use two squares of toilet tissue folded in half twice. I use 4 small rectangles of duct tape to tape that down at the1:00 position. Years ago..no longer... I used this clear material I purchased at a material store after seeing a road drummer use it. It comes in various weights. I used cymbals to cut it to size. It's like thick suran wrap. This road drummer was playing a ludwig kit without bottom heads yet from the audience his toms sounded full..not the usual attack no reso head sound..yuck. For YEARS this was my secret but I DID let it out now and then.
thanks for your feedback
 

Otto

Platinum Member
I know you are talking about a specific object to place on the instrument to change the timbre produced 'when the object remains in place both before, during and after the strike'...but I immediately began to think of the range of objects that can be in contact with the instrument at the point of impact through the expression of the desired sound...such as the object itself that strikes the instrument.

Striking the instrument and leaving the 'stick' in contact with the instrument can change the timbre of the instrument's expressed sound...as can 'getting the stick off the instrument quickly'.

Further, you can change the characteristics of the contact through the strike and its resolution...by increasing/decreasing the pressure through the strike-resolution, moving the angle of the 'stick', ghosting rhythms inside those pressure changes, contacting the instrument with an 'off hand' to manipulate the resulting sound ...and on...and on...

Consider the possibilities of molding the sound you create by altering the strike or what happens around the strike.
 

Ryan Culberson

Well-known member
Some readily available items that have worked well for me in the past:

car keys
wallet
phone (great dry, crisp muffling)
splash cymbal or cup chime
goat hooves or seed pod thingies
different weight and width plastic rings
upside down drumhead
leather chamois (binder clipped to hoop)
tambourine

Have used other stuff as well but my memory isn’t allowing me access to that info at the moment.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
The only thing that's standard for me is he seed pod thingy I put n my aux snare.

I have all the Big Fat Snare stuff, but it's often just part of the solution. Usually for low volume stuff I need to find a different sound to work and it's a combination of finding the right stuff to put on top of the snare as well as the right tool to play with. Then comes the tape and/or gel to fine tune it. I'll often have to change it to get the right effect in a different room.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Don't forget to try a regular piece of printer paper on your snare drum. It provides a deep low thick sound. More than one piece works too.
It works great because I can quickly put it on for one song and quickly take it off.

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