Difference between a Yamaha FP7210 Professional Series and FP7210a?

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I was unaware there was two of them. When I google search them either of them come up and look identical.
Heck, musicradar list them as “beginner” pedals. What the heck do they know?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
There is no difference. The FP7210a is the only one listed on the Yamaha product site.

Looking under shopping, I found FP7210, FP7210a, FP7210 Professional Model, and FP7210a Professional Model. They are all the same in description, features, and price range.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
There is no difference. The FP7210a is the only one listed on the Yamaha product site.

Looking under shopping, I found FP7210, FP7210a, FP7210 Professional Model, and FP7210a Professional Model. They are all the same in description, features, and price range.
7210 Professional is older and no longer on any site. There used to be a 7210 and 7210 pro. There had to be something for the classification. Bearings, less play..something...
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
The only difference that I was aware of are the anti-slip carpet claws.



versus



Looking at the pics, I also notice a difference in the chain guide and the use of hex-screws, thicker shaft instead of thin shaft with thin shaft with cast-top bracing.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
The only difference that I was aware of are the anti-slip carpet claws.



versus



Looking at the pics, I also notice a difference in the chain guide and the use of hex-screws, thicker shaft instead of thin shaft with thin shaft with cast-top bracing.
The cam/beater holder appears to be different also. The top looks like 2 pieces while the bottom looks like 1. And it says Professional Model on the heel plate. All the ones I saw looked like the bottom one and were like $65-75.
 
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AzHeat

Platinum Member
From the pic, I see the pro has adjustable beater angle. That looks a lot like my old 80s Yamaha pedal. Doesn't seem to be the case across all pro pics I see. Looks like they changed that at some point. It also appears you can move the pro into a slave position as well.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Okay, maybe they changed the beater angle adjustment, because that’s definitely adjustable on the non pro and newer too. Just differently than a slotted adjustment like pictured.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Uh oh. To maintain my "pro" status I better get the one that says "Professional Model" on the heel. Or maybe I'm not professional enough.....
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Well, I answered my own question by picking a 7210 Professional Model. It's been around the block for several years. It arrived pretty dirty, has some scratches and the paint on the underside of the heel plate is fully worn. With some clean up, it looks better, but you can still tell it's been used for a while. This old pedal has very little side-to-side play. The connection between the pedal board and heel plate are very tight, but not restrictive. The bars attaching the heel plate to the body are super stiff compared to the newer pedal, which I'm sure helps as well. Also, as I assumed earlier, it can become a slave pedal.

I really wanted to stick with the strap drive for a second pedal, but decided to see what the older "pro" pedal was about and I could always swap if I wanted to. I played on it for about an hour yesterday and I can't tell the difference between the strap and chain on this one. The chain is thin and light. Definitely not like the heavier double chained ones I've played on. I sorta felt the same about the Yamaha 9500c vs 9500d. I've tried chain vs DD pedals in the past in the same model and they have been night and day different. I just couldn't really tell that much difference with the 9500d vs c. I had them both side-by-side for a while and chose the DD because it was just a touch smoother. With the 7210 vs 6110, the side-to-side motion is noticeable, but it never threw me before. The old 7200 is more solid. There's no doubt.

Looking at them, the construction and molds used seem similar, but not exact. The 7210 was built in Indonesia and the 7210 in China. Aside from the spurs and the extended shaft on the 7200, it's really hard to tell them apart.

Not sure if there are any construction, wobble and play differences between the 7210 (pre "a") and 7210 pro built in the same time frame, but one thing's really clear. The old pedal, while it has tons of cycles, is far from ready to collapse. Everything is still tight, unworn, squeak and rattle free.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Well, I answered my own question by picking a 7210 Professional Model. It's been around the block for several years. It arrived pretty dirty, has some scratches and the paint on the underside of the heel plate is fully worn. With some clean up, it looks better, but you can still tell it's been used for a while. This old pedal has very little side-to-side play. The connection between the pedal board and heel plate are very tight, but not restrictive. The bars attaching the heel plate to the body are super stiff compared to the newer pedal, which I'm sure helps as well. Also, as I assumed earlier, it can become a slave pedal.

I really wanted to stick with the strap drive for a second pedal, but decided to see what the older "pro" pedal was about and I could always swap if I wanted to. I played on it for about an hour yesterday and I can't tell the difference between the strap and chain on this one. The chain is thin and light. Definitely not like the heavier double chained ones I've played on. I sorta felt the same about the Yamaha 9500c vs 9500d. I've tried chain vs DD pedals in the past in the same model and they have been night and day different. I just couldn't really tell that much difference with the 9500d vs c. I had them both side-by-side for a while and chose the DD because it was just a touch smoother. With the 7210 vs 6110, the side-to-side motion is noticeable, but it never threw me before. The old 7200 is more solid. There's no doubt.

Looking at them, the construction and molds used seem similar, but not exact. The 7210 was built in Indonesia and the 7210 in China. Aside from the spurs and the extended shaft on the 7200, it's really hard to tell them apart.

Not sure if there are any construction, wobble and play differences between the 7210 (pre "a") and 7210 pro built in the same time frame, but one thing's really clear. The old pedal, while it has tons of cycles, is far from ready to collapse. Everything is still tight, unworn, squeak and rattle free.
I don’t think pedals show wear and tear until they’ve been neglected for 25+ years.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
I don’t think pedals show wear and tear until they’ve been neglected for 25+ years.
There's just nothing to these pedals. No Delta hinges, cool bearings or connectors and even has a plastic roller for the spring attachment. The hinge at the heel is actually no more than a polished rod through plastic grommets. I'm pleasantly surprised to learn how little wear if any the much older pedal shows all connection points. They definitely didn't go low budget, even though they don't look like anything special.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
There's just nothing to these pedals. No Delta hinges, cool bearings or connectors and even has a plastic roller for the spring attachment. The hinge at the heel is actually no more than a polished rod through plastic grommets. I'm pleasantly surprised to learn how little wear if any the much older pedal shows all connection points. They definitely didn't go low budget, even though they don't look like anything special.
This was my attraction to the older Camcos and DWs after trying all those high falootin pedals that were supposed to make me play better! Give me simple mechanisms that my foot can put to work and I’m done. Trick and Axis don’t matter if you can’t play anyway.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
This was my attraction to the older Camcos and DWs after trying all those high falootin pedals that were supposed to make me play better! Give me simple mechanisms that my foot can put to work and I’m done. Trick and Axis don’t matter if you can’t play anyway.
Yup, I just don't think about these pedals. Didn't give my Mapex Falcon any thought either, so it's in this camp, although hugely overbuilt by comparison. All my other pedals just felt like I had to hold my mouth just right to be able to execute what I thought I could. I'm glad you started me down this path. Actually pleasantly surprised. When the pedal blows up, I'll pick up another for cheap. Actually, may grab a couple more, when I see them cheapI. It's just cheaper to strip parts off one, then to buy them retail. A beater and spring and I'm already over.
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
I was unaware there was two of them. When I google search them either of them come up and look identical.
Heck, musicradar list them as “beginner” pedals. What the heck do they know?
In my experience musicradar and more “mainstream” music media sites don’t have the best knowledge of drums
 
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