Dealing with a bad night, no groove...

mikyok

Platinum Member
I one time played a gig about 4 days after having hemorrhoid surgery... There was only one "groove" I was worried about that night! Haha. Gig ended up going really really well actually, most of it was accompanying hip hop artists so I had a ton of simple steady 4/4.
How big was the pillow on your bass drum stool?....the grapes of wrath! You're an absolute warrior for doing that!

I played a gig after having a minor op on my right foot which left me with a stitch in between my 2nd and 3rd toe. I couldn't wear shoes or trainers as it was that swollen so I had to play the gig with a slipper on my bass drum foot. Bass drum was played slightly quieter than usual.

I find gigging helps if there's something on my mind and as I found out a couple months back grief. Playing lets me escape reality for a bit and the good thing about being a drummer is you choose how involved you want to be and make it work!
 

roncadillac

Member
How big was the pillow on your bass drum stool?....the grapes of wrath! You're an absolute warrior for doing that!

I played a gig after having a minor op on my right foot which left me with a stitch in between my 2nd and 3rd toe. I couldn't wear shoes or trainers as it was that swollen so I had to play the gig with a slipper on my bass drum foot. Bass drum was played slightly quieter than usual.

I find gigging helps if there's something on my mind and as I found out a couple months back grief. Playing lets me escape reality for a bit and the good thing about being a drummer is you choose how involved you want to be and make it work!
Don't worry, I have one of those tama 1st round rider "xl" models. They should use me for an advertisement lol
 

SharkSandwich

Junior Member
I'm not sure I've ever experienced an inability to relax. I have for sure had "bad nights" where I just wasn't feeling it
or my mix was bad and nothing felt right. Maybe I made a few mistakes and I'm a little rattled.
On those nights I just try to make every note count and play to the best of my abilities.

We're usually out own worsts critics and I've found that when I do have these "off nights", I end up listening
back to the recording (we often record our shows) and it sounds fine. In fact, I recently had what felt
like and off night and I our guitarist listened to the recording and said he thought it was one of our best performances!

I guess what I'm saying is, we will have off nights but it's important to keep it in perspective and your playing
probably sounds fine.
 

Icetech

Gold Member
Meditation is one healthy way I can think of helping to achieve flow states more often.
The reality is that we're probably rigid and lacking flow more often than we're in a flow state. I try to get my worst days to be good enough to keep people dancing and I'm happy with that and then I look forward to the times when flow states are achieved.
For me, I think anxiety and worry are the emotions that block that flow state and we have to be forgiving with ourselves in modern times where there is so much fear and hate being thrown around so casually by the media and the public.
I have a subscription to the calm app and I do think the daily meditations help a lot.
Best of luck to you.
I might have to try meditation, i am basically a bundle of stress, mostly about money.. cause.. life :) i'll work on getting it under control
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
Once I start playing I feel fine.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I also think having a lousy night helps reset my expectations for my own playing and ability to enjoy the music, even if I trample all over it.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
playing gigs, for me, is the escape from all of the other crap in my life...no matter what leads up to a gig day, the day of the gig itself is a separate "holiday", on purpose. From a very young age, I was taught that gigs, concerts, performances etc were sacred/religious type events. The world revolved around that day. (My mom's side of the fam were all professional classical or jazz musicians).

I always get to thhe gig, and get in a Zen space as load in and set up happen. Another thing that I always used as a young player to get my self mentally ready was to think about what my heroes at the time would think about my performance. If Geddy, Niel, Steve Harris, Nicko etc. walked in, what would they say? I still do that to this day

as I got older, and started doing more cover type stuff, I would also start thinking about what the original writer would say about my performance. I remember really thinking this while playing the drum set part to West Side Story in college. I kept thinking if my version was doing justice to Bernstiens vision...I do the same thing in my jazz and country band. Did the version I just played fit the expectation of, or do justice to, the original writers intention/vision/legacy....this always keeps me honest, and focused
 

Icetech

Gold Member
Thanks guys.. i think my brain is just broken :) I will be working on it.. went home last night went to play and spent a hour re-tuning my kit.. i am really not liking my new kit much and starting think of selling it and keeping the DW designs.. the yamahas just will not stay in tune for more than 2 hours at a time (i mean out of tune to the point of barely resonating) and it's making me nuts, gonna try some clear single plys first though since they like being tuned higher.
 

iCe

Senior Member
I'm not in a gigging band at the moment, but when rehearing i sometimes also feel that it's just not my day. I could get really annoyed by this and that outed itself in aggressive fills which ofcourse lacked proper technique, me hitting the rims, failing a fill, getting more annoyed etc.
Eventually i just realised i needed to accept it that i just have an off-day. That helps me relax and focus on my playing instead spending energy on frustrations.
 

moodman

Well-known member
On a gig, the reciprocal energy of an audience and the other players, can fuel your energy.
The main thing, for me, is to not play tentatively, be confident and not overthink your playing.
Playing by myself, some days you are in the zone, other days your just doing your best, less inspired.
 
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jazzerooty

Junior Member
You just psyched yourself out. There is always a next time, and by no means is it an indicator of it happening again. It happens to everyone. But for a durmmer, it's very painful, as it messes up the band and all the musicians get bummed with it. The best thing I had going when I was young was playing six nights a week, which really builds up your playing and confidence. It's difficult to be fantastic when you gig so infrequently. Remember, it's a one-off--not the end of the world.
 
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