DDrum Dios Hammered Bronze Snare

FlamFlamMan

Senior Member
Hey All,

Some guy wants to trade me a 6.5 x 14 Dios Hand Hammered Bronze Snare for some hardware I'm selling.

This is a stock photo of one, but he tells me its in great shape. And I'll inspect it before any deal.

The only price I can find for one is $480 shipped for a new one, but looking at ebay Ddrum doesn't seem to hold their value well. There haven't been any of these sold on Ebay recently either. I'm thinking that this drum probably isn't worth more than $200-$250.

I'm certainly not in need of more snares (current have 8) or particularly in want of this drum, but it would take up less room than a pile of hardware I don't need.

Has anyone here played one of these or even own one? I'm looking for opinions on how this drum sounds and what its worth. Anyone?

 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
I'd say your value appraisal is about right. With my business head on, $200 is probably what I would say.

I haven't played or heard one but it's theoretically a nice-sounding drum. Unfortunately, DDrum have a poor reputation (deservedly or otherwise) for quality control and consistency. As a result, even though it's probably a nice drum, it's not worth much. If you don't want another snare drum then I don't think there's much point in going through with the deal. You'll probably struggle to sell it for more than you trade it for. Your safer bet is to just sell the hardware directly - depending on what it is, you may well get more for it.
 

HMNY

Silver Member
What is the deal with dDrum, you're right in that they don't get a good reputation on any drum forum, although they have a number of big name artists (mainly metal) on their roster.....
 

FlamFlamMan

Senior Member
I'd say your value appraisal is about right. With my business head on, $200 is probably what I would say.

I haven't played or heard one but it's theoretically a nice-sounding drum. Unfortunately, DDrum have a poor reputation (deservedly or otherwise) for quality control and consistency. As a result, even though it's probably a nice drum, it's not worth much. If you don't want another snare drum then I don't think there's much point in going through with the deal. You'll probably struggle to sell it for more than you trade it for. Your safer bet is to just sell the hardware directly - depending on what it is, you may well get more for it.
Yeah, but remember selling hardware is a pain in the butt. Its pretty much too heavy to be worth while to ship, and most people just want one piece at a time. Its a huge hassle to set up 6-7 different meetings to maybe sell each person a $30 cymbal stand.

I'm leaning towards trying to give him some (not all) the hardware for the snare. Total, I wanted $360 for the hardware. Its not real high-end stuff but its good stuff. I'll see if I can offer him about $190 worth.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
I hadn't taken into consideration how hard it is to sell hardware. I should know, I had to throw a load of (knackered) stuff out recently because it was unsellable.

I would say $200. You should be able to shift the snare for that.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
What is the deal with dDrum, you're right in that they don't get a good reputation on any drum forum, although they have a number of big name artists (mainly metal) on their roster.....
They offer big exposure to well-known metal drummers and obviously offer them a few sweeteners that they couldn't get with other companies upfront. Free gear, probably.

Within about two years, most of them have left. Dave Lombardo was on DDrum's books after he left Tama and within a couple of years went to Ludwig. That seems like a fairly typical case. Clearly there are promises being made upfront and then the 'artist experience' turns out to be ultimately disappointing. I don't have any insider knowledge as to what those disappointments could be. Lack of logistical support? Poor contact from agents? Poor drums?
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Their lack of experience manufacturing quality acoustic drums,and QC issues,as well as shipping drums that had obvious QC problems,seem to be the issues that crop up the most.

I'm talking botched bearing edges , cracked drum shells,and selling seconds without full disclosure,although the later may just be a dealer problem in fairness.

They also seem to a target a faily narrow audience.

Steve B
 

HMNY

Silver Member
Ouch, that is quite a list!

Did they start as an acoustic manufacturer, or move from the electronic/triggers space?

I would guess that somewhere down the line their drums probably come out of the same factory as other similar price point drums?
 

john gerrard

Senior Member
I don't own one nor have I ever played one, BUT, I would think that the shell would have been made by the same company that sells many other companies their bronze shells. So DDrum would have nothing to do with quality control on the shell. I doubt very much if DDrum makes their own rims or other hardware so there again the quality control issue would not be DDrums. Myself I would gamble on that drum. It looks like a very nice drum. Being that it's not a wood drum and subject to DDrum doing the edges or the drilling or even the building of the shell really how much could DDrum have screwed up on that drum ? I'll bet that all they did was assemble it. Just my guess, I could be wrong. I would pay $150 or$200 for it in a heart beat. John
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
As far as metal shells,most drum companys farm out that work now a days.Sonor may still be making all their own metal drum shell,but somehow I doubt it.

There are quite a lots of envornmental issues to consider,as well as cost.

D Drum is new to the organic wood shelled drum market,and started as an E drum maker,and did well in that area.

There are already so many proven mainline drum manufactures ,and even the relativle new guys like Tama,Pearl,Yamaha and Mapex,build good drums for their perspective price points,why take a chance.

Gretsch is building great stuff,and Ludwig is just killin' with American made Keystones and Legacys,not to mention the Atlas hardware line

Wait till DDrums builds a few years worth of good drums.That's what the industry did in the mid 70's when Tama,Pearl and Yamaha were busy rewriting the book on drum building 101.,and in doing so,scared the crap out of the American big four.

Steve B
 
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