Cymbals tilted Away...

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I continue to see drummers with their crash cymbals with the tilt away from them. Is this a fad or is there a sensible reason for this.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Depends on how far the tilt is. Speaking for myself, I like my crash cymbals flat, so the cymbal edge is Right. There. At least that's what it looks like to me from the throne. Looking at the kit from further away, yea the crash cymbals look like they are very slightly tilted away from me. I don't do it purposely but it ends up looking like that. So I guess I could be that guy.

I do it because the edge of the crash cymbal...I can make the edge sound the most consistent. I don't have to compensate for any downward cymbal angle when the edge is sitting right up there high and pretty waiting for me to exploit it :) That's the only reason I do it. My personal play-ability preference.

I rarely use 100% cymbal volume. More like 60-70% I like them to bloom as slowly as possible as opposed to all then nothing. Generally speaking. That way they don't sound harsh to me. It's easiest for me to get that bloom with a glancing edge crash. In my head it's all about trying to sound creamy smooth.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
The ones I see are pretty much 10 degrees or more tilted away.. I first thought they were ttrying for level and just the heavy side of the cymbal making them tilt but the stand tilters are tilted as well.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I guess it's an optical illusion from the throne. I swear they look flat to me while playing. 10 degrees. That sounds like a little much. Mine are probably 5 degrees. 10 degrees or more could be for attention.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
They do it because they enjoy buying new cymbals.
If I did this with the back-line kit I provide for the open mic jam I host, I'd be buying new cymbals every few weeks.

.
 
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AzHeat

Platinum Member
The lower mine have come, the flatter they have also become, for much the same reason as Larry has stated. They needed to fo me to be able to get a consistent tone. Anika has a pretty extreme tilt to her cymbals. The only one of mine that ever gets angled like this is my Wuhan China. If it isn't tilted, it won't open up.
86349
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
It's kind of like wearing your pants without a belt...

At some point in time someone decided it looked "cool" and the rest as they say is history.

Now we who wear our pants proper and have our cymbals at reasonable positions, have always known it isn't cool, chuckle under our breath every time we see it, but why ruin it for someone else? Let the illusion stand.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Annika's ride is tilted towards her. It's only the crashes.
Yea, it has to do with angles of attack. Since crashes are typically used as edge-only for the one sound, it's common to tilt them so that you automatically hit the edge only like that. For rides or things you need to articulate some bell or bow work, things are different. Other times it has more to do with how the drummer sits or sometimes they lean forward. If the arc of your swing puts the most power up a little bit then these weird angles can work.

And sometimes it's just for looks.
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
They do it because they enjoy buying new cymbals.
If I did this with the back-line kit I provide for the open mic jam I host, I'd be buying new cymbals every few weeks.

.
That's how I feel . I've always tilted mine towards me slightly because I feel they're less likely to crack. Nobody's actually told me that but that's just what I think
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
OK, I've been thinking about it some more.
If your cymbals are sitting very low, like just slightly above the rim of the toms; then yes you might need to have them sitting flat. But not tilted away from you. But my cymbals, and most other drummer's cymbals, are like four feet high. So when struck from a sitting position it is easy to strike the edge of the crash.

.
 

newoldie

Silver Member
I tend to use my crashes for some light riding so I use a slight tilt towards me- flat is too difficult to ride. And my ride is comfortably angled towards me to allow both riding and crashing.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
No sir not sensible (disclaimer: may be unpopular opinion) other than biting off more than needed - why we see a lot of cracked/repaired cymbals for sale on the internet
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
One man's sensible is another man's senseless.

Everyone is different, thank providence. Whatever works for the individual. Me, I don't see how drummers can sit so low and play with their knees above their hips. I just can't relate, but I don't make judgements on people playing that way. It just doesn't matter. The net result of their playing matters. How that all comes together is simply individual choice, and it's unrealistic to think everyone should do it the same way. I like the diversity of approaches.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I an testing tilting my crash cymbal away from me and hitting the cymbal edge. I like it. I like the sound. I like the access to the edge. I'm afraid of cracking the cymbal. Maybe not me but some open mike jammer is going to crack that cymbal.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
I tend to use my crashes for some light riding so I use a slight tilt towards me- flat is too difficult to ride. And my ride is comfortably angled towards me to allow both riding and crashing.
Me too - I use a few sounds from each cymbal, including playing on top of crashes, playing the bell of crashes and crashing the ride, so I have my ride and crash(es) both at chest height, tilting towards me.
 
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