Cymbal sweet spot vs cymbal default position.

Peedy

Senior Member
Ya know, I got so caught up in all the Industrial Engineering stuff that I totally forgot to say ME TOO when it comes to imperfect cymbals. Love my 50-90yo cymbals and I'm certain none of em are perfect.

Pete
 

bongoman

Junior Member
you can't just flatten it out and expect not to hit the edge continuously. sometimes thinking is a good thing.
It helps to lower the height. I have my ride set flat, and I adjust the angle of my wrist/arm for different qualities of stick attack.
 

iCe

Senior Member
I don't use it at the moment, but the Paiste Sound Formula 20" Dry Ride i have lying around has the same 'flaw'. It's a tad heavier on one side and it always finds it's way back to that. First i thought it was the stand that did this, but my Zildjian 21" A Sweet Ride didn't do that on that stand.
It annoys me that it doesn't move freely, perhaps i think because i suspect that's how keyholes start to form (even though i always use those hard plastics protectors, can't remember the name)
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
With the flat cymbal my first concern is that it's not going to be the right angle for a swing ride pattern. I will try it tonight but I am sure already thatit's going to stay at the current angle. Anyways, I let this go. ;)

You guys help me quite a bit with my thinking (((;

Ya know, I got so caught up in all the Industrial Engineering stuff that I totally forgot to say ME TOO when it comes to imperfect cymbals. Love my 50-90yo cymbals and I'm certain none of em are perfect.

Pete
My My 90 years old cymbal, do you have a video channel by chance where you display them and their sounds? I hope to visit a collector one day to listen to old rides.

Now it's pretty clear that they all have something, qualities and faults, more then I thought.

I don't use it at the moment, but the Paiste Sound Formula 20" Dry Ride i have lying around has the same 'flaw'. It's a tad heavier on one side and it always finds it's way back to that. First i thought it was the stand that did this, but my Zildjian 21" A Sweet Ride didn't do that on that stand.
It annoys me that it doesn't move freely, perhaps i think because i suspect that's how keyholes start to form (even though i always use those hard plastics protectors, can't remember the name)
Is it the only thing why the Sound formule 20 is stored ? What about the sound is it good?

Can't say I have ever noticed.
Oki thanks, just checking, they are all different.
 

Peedy

Senior Member
My My 90 years old cymbal, do you have a video channel by chance where you display them and their sounds? I hope to visit a collector one day to listen to old rides.

Now it's pretty clear that they all have something, qualities and faults, more then I thought.

They don't have any faults, just character.

And I do throw up badly made videos here from time to time just for the fun of it.

Pete
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
If the position of logo bothers you rub it off. Otherwise just play it till it “crashes” lol. It’s not just the cymbal but the plastic holder- some flat some round and size snd thickness of felt (it impacts sound to) . My Dream vintage Bliss crash ride was like a flying saucer and didn’t have good ride definition. I added tape underneath that worked but found I had a round cymals rest and small felt so put a flat one and a wide felt- like bottom hat felt. It sticks better now in ride and less spin. Perfect for quiet playing
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I'm not sure I'm on board with the sweet spot theory.

There's all kinds of different sounds I get from say a ride cymbal. Depending on where and how I hit it.

To take one of those sounds and call it the sweetest..which implies that the player aims for the sweet spot all the time, is misguided IMO.

Cymbals have lots of "sweet spots" depending on what I want.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I tend to agree with Larry-that's what's great about cymbals is where, how, what you hit them with you can generate all kinds of sweet sounds. Same goes for hi-hats which you can generate a similar multitude of sounds. Sort of the reason I don't understand having a huge multitude of cymbals (seems missing out exploring each one?). Heck I dropped my cowbell cause I can get a similar sound hitting the bell of hats and/or underneath hat tube-resonates nicely and I use it like a cowbell or clave for practice. I have a wood block and cowbell in a storage box I have to find since our recent move. TBH I spent decades playing cymbals one dimensionally-I whack it and get a sound. I thought that was it-but when I got my 22 in Zild K Con OMG what a palette of sounds I discovered-so then went back over all my cymbals and discovered pretty much the same-I'd hadn't really given many cymbals a fair chance in my naivety. Cymbals are beautiful things-just independent of any drum-and there are all kinds-which I guess is the reason people have so many LOL.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
They don't have any faults, just character.

And I do throw up badly made videos here from time to time just for the fun of it.

Pete
They have character hehe great, that's seeing it from another angle. That's why it's good to ask others opinions heheh thanks.

It's also the sound. Too much of that typical Paiste ping haha.
Fairly heavy ride as well and i prefer thinner rides.
Ok then, and I guess you are unable to put it for sale, just like me? :)

If the position of logo bothers you rub it off. Otherwise just play it till it “crashes” lol. It’s not just the cymbal but the plastic holder- some flat some round and size snd thickness of felt (it impacts sound to) . My Dream vintage Bliss crash ride was like a flying saucer and didn’t have good ride definition. I added tape underneath that worked but found I had a round cymals rest and small felt so put a flat one and a wide felt- like bottom hat felt. It sticks better now in ride and less spin. Perfect for quiet playing
Felt, I never tried that material on a cymbal.. And by chance I have some even in various colors. What dimension do you use? for what size of cymbal if you want to tell me.

I dunno. My guess would be that pissing and moaning about stuff is good therapy, especially during trying times.

Pete
heheh yeah!

Also, curiosity is good, and anti-curiosity is not.
It's very interesting so far, I am all for curiosity.

I'm not sure I'm on board with the sweet spot theory.

There's all kinds of different sounds I get from say a ride cymbal. Depending on where and how I hit it.

To take one of those sounds and call it the sweetest..which implies that the player aims for the sweet spot all the time, is misguided IMO.

Cymbals have lots of "sweet spots" depending on what I want.
I am not there yet but my K custom Dark Ride is awesome, i tried a couple of rided at the store yesterday and.. there was not a match for mine, according to my taste. I am going to exploit all of it if I can, everything I can reach, it's truly a musical instrument.. with a nasty character :ROFLMAO:


I tend to agree with Larry-that's what's great about cymbals is where, how, what you hit them with you can generate all kinds of sweet sounds. Same goes for hi-hats which you can generate a similar multitude of sounds. Sort of the reason I don't understand having a huge multitude of cymbals (seems missing out exploring each one?). Heck I dropped my cowbell cause I can get a similar sound hitting the bell of hats and/or underneath hat tube-resonates nicely and I use it like a cowbell or clave for practice. I have a wood block and cowbell in a storage box I have to find since our recent move. TBH I spent decades playing cymbals one dimensionally-I whack it and get a sound. I thought that was it-but when I got my 22 in Zild K Con OMG what a palette of sounds I discovered-so then went back over all my cymbals and discovered pretty much the same-I'd hadn't really given many cymbals a fair chance in my naivety. Cymbals are beautiful things-just independent of any drum-and there are all kinds-which I guess is the reason people have so many LOL.
I will try to exploit everything I can and it's so true about having too much cymbals and not exploring all of them at all.. so so so true.. I bought a 4 piece drum kit and.. at first I thought it was not enough shells, that's foolish thinking.

Less is more.

I like what you say very much because I think the same thing, these cymbal like the Constantinople, I tried one yesterday at the store, they have a lot of different sounds to give, just like my K custom. They are impressive musical instrument in my opinion also, for some styles of music.

Good luck finding your block and bell.

I am going to try these cymbals right now, I have good motivation :)
 

bongoman

Junior Member
Regarding the idea of sweet spot as “just one sound from hitting just one spot” vs. “getting a range of sounds from hitting all over”, it’s not necessarily a dichotomy like that. For one example, one of my favorite rides is a block stamp A, and it sounds very different all around its surfaces. Some points have better sounding crash, bell, or stick sounds, while other points sound more sour or clangy.

So what I did was play all around it over time, and put bits of post it note to mark the better spots, and eventually decided on one overall area that sounded best when pointed toward me, and made a little Sharpie mark on the bell. Now, when I have it set up with the little mark facing me, I know I’m getting the best range of sounds as I play its various voices. Again, I’m playing all kinds of strokes and attacks across the cymbal, but in the collective “sweet spot”.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
Regarding the idea of sweet spot as “just one sound from hitting just one spot” vs. “getting a range of sounds from hitting all over”, it’s not necessarily a dichotomy like that. For one example, one of my favorite rides is a block stamp A, and it sounds very different all around its surfaces. Some points have better sounding crash, bell, or stick sounds, while other points sound more sour or clangy.

So what I did was play all around it over time, and put bits of post it note to mark the better spots, and eventually decided on one overall area that sounded best when pointed toward me, and made a little Sharpie mark on the bell. Now, when I have it set up with the little mark facing me, I know I’m getting the best range of sounds as I play its various voices. Again, I’m playing all kinds of strokes and attacks across the cymbal, but in the collective “sweet spot”.
Ahh great explanation, that's extraordinary.

The collective sweet spot!

So you can use the part you like for a given task or simply by taste. Thanks for the explanation @bongoman. I knew this was real.
 

iCe

Senior Member
Ok then, and I guess you are unable to put it for sale, just like me? :)
I tried selling a few cymbals on a site, but i need to have patience and also deal with idiots who bid on a fixed price with a ridiculous low price
Still holding on to it as with a couple of other cymbals and haven't decided what to do with them
Should sell them or even trade them in for something a do want
 
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