Cymbal sweet spot vs cymbal default position.

Auspicious

Well-known member
Hello,

On my ride, there is an heavier side, so whatever I do and because there is a slight inclination in that cymbal, it will always rotate back to it's it's original position.

I can only ride that cymbal at around the same spot.

But what if the sweet spot is on the other side of the bell or away from the default spot on the sides? Sounds like a stupid question.. but I often think about this, the default spot is not the sweetest spot and above all, the sound is slightly different all around the cymbal, yet, not accessible. (Cybal is a K custom dark ride, the one in my avatar)

It's matter of exploiting these sweet sounds at low volume mainly in a jazz ride pattern.

Anyone had a similar issue and any solution found ?
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I can't fathom that it sounds all that different on the far side of the ride if you are the same distance on the bow. But if so....
Play your ride flat.
Tighten the cymbal nut so it does not rotate so easily.
Ride the cymbal at a different spot on the bow and learn to love that spot.
 

Peedy

Senior Member
Just about every cast cymbal made has some kind of imperfection. You can find out just how much the run out of the cymbal varies with a deep reach caliper (expensive so I’m not suggesting it). They look perfect when you buy them because companies have gotten much better at finishing them to hide any issues.

As for dealing with the lean, I’ve only seen one person successfully address it. He drilled a small hole in one side and weighted it. It was, however, a cheap ride. I would sell it off and replace it.

Pete
1594522382268.jpeg
 
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Charles Edward

New member
Hello, I have that exact same cymbal, K custom dark ride, and it always seems to settle back to the same spot if I have it tilted towards me. It's never bothered me, but if I wanted to experiment with finding a sweet spot on the opposite side, I would just change the angle of the stand so it's tilted away from me, then drop that thing down and pull it in tight to get over the top of it.

There are sweet spots all over that cymbal. the weight variation gives it character, don't drill holes in it.
 

bongoman

Junior Member
One of my favorite rides, an old A, has the problem op described where the sweet spot isn’t the heavy spot. The solution that works for me is to set it flat, so the heavy spot doesn’t rotate toward me.
 

Frosticles

Silver Member
I also have a K Custom Dark ride (22") It sits in the same position every time. Sounds wonderful so it doesn't bother me :) Some tend to over think certain situations :)
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
Thanks for all the answers

@Peedy The caliper seems like a decent idea whey buying the cymbal. You would sell the cymbal really?
@Winston_Wolf All my logos are away from the default hitting spot, luck I guess.
@Charles Edward thanks for the feedback about your cymbal.

I will try to set it flat and tighten the bolt to hold it in place, I don't know if I am going to like it at a flat angle, seems a bit unnatural for the natural jazz ride sticking position of the arm and wrist but I never tried.

@Frosticles Lucky, I might overthink things.

***

@Charles and @Frosticles Your K custom dark ride, does it produce a acute whistle sound when you hit it with more strength or crash it around the edge?, a sound similar to turning your wet finger around the edge of a thin glass?

Rock Salad: hehehe that's a positive way of seeing it :).

Thanks for all the tips, @opentune for now I will try to adjust the angle and tighten the bolt and see how it goes, they are curious cymbals, I swear it, they are different all around, at lower volume at least.
 

Peedy

Senior Member
@Peedy The caliper seems like a decent idea whey buying the cymbal. You would sell the cymbal really?

It wouldn't be the most practical approach to buying a cymbal. However, it's informative when you see one leaning and you're tempted to wonder why. That caliper cost 750 bucks and the table model I'm sure Zildjian QC has cost 10,000 plus. Those guys will plot out every mark on one line (and then another and another etc) until they've covered the whole cymbal with marks moving away from center in all directions. They'll measure the cymbal's thickness at each point in thousandths of inch to see how much the thickness varies (thickness = weight).

Don't think Guitar Center would have that kind of patience.

Pete

IMG_6469.jpg


edit - would I sell the cymbal? If it bothers you and there's no practical way to deal with it, sure. There are tons of great cymbals out there in Musical Land.
 
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Auspicious

Well-known member
It wouldn't be the most practical approach to buying a cymbal. However, it's informative when you see one leaning and you're tempted to wonder why. That caliper cost 750 bucks and the table model I'm sure Zildjian QC has cost 10,000 plus. Those guys will plot out every mark on one line (and then another and another etc) until they've covered the whole cymbal with marks moving away from center in all directions. They'll measure the cymbal's thickness at each point in thousandths of inch to see how much the thickness varies (thickness = weight).

Don't think Guitar Center would have that kind of patience.

Pete

View attachment 94103
Ok ok, bah mine is probably in the tolerances anyway... I have a good idea of what could happen at the music store with me using a caliper lol, it would look odd probably, especially from a person that don't know s*** like me. :ROFLMAO:

But it's reasonable idea in my deep opinion and using your template as a guide.

The next time I buy a cymbal like this kind, I'll know what to look for. I will install it on a real mount and play it to see about it's rotation and listen for whistle or other weird complex sounds. I bought mine with very little experience as it was the only cymbal in the store that sounded like the jazz albums I was listening too and the old K's or other dark, complex cymbals. I loved it instantly and forgot to consider other issues, issues I was not even aware of at the time.

Learning by doing mistakes, but like @Frosticles said, I am probably overthinking it. I'll have this cymbal looked up by a professional around Montréal some day to see how good it really is, if I have that opportunity.

So far my experience was 100% self-taught, but I am satisfied... and lately I understood how to incorporate interesting fills in my playing, it's helping my motivation a lot, but that's another story.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
All cymbals I have naturally gravitate towards a preferred spot
Same. I have some patina spots on one of my rides that helps me notice it likes to sit a particular way on the stand. Never really worried about it.

Honestly I'm not sure how many people would hear that "sweet spot" difference anyway, especially in context of a band/music or mix.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
Ok so I learned a couple of new things today about the weight and and the sweet spot. I will still try to put mine flat, when I get behind the drums, soon I hope.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
no no not too much overthinking things. I am trough with that now lol. I am actually going to play that ride right now.
 
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