Cymbal stand memory...?

Bigdumbdrums

Senior Member
After years of experimentation with various setups and configurations - I think I finally have my "perfect" drum setup. That said, I have a 5' x 7' rug with stand and pedal locations taped off to remember exactly where everything goes. I have memory locks throughout all my Yamaha hardware (tom mounts mostly) but the one thing that is sorely lacking in the drum hardware world is a system for remembering how to consistently adjust cymbal stand heights and angles of booms.
Does anyone have a home-grown system for this? I have 4 stands and 3 of them collapse for transport but I would love to have a visual system for remembering the precise height of each stand. I would think someone would design stands with tiny lines or holes drilled vertically along the stand shaft(s) so that we could mark the desired height easily. Right now I use a Sharpie to mark the height which works well but only temporary as it eventually wears off.
Tape doesn't work because you can't collapse the stands when tape is wrapped around the shaft.
Call me anal (and yes I am aware I have used the words "shaft" and "anal" in the same post) but I like to setup and breakdown as quickly as possible and remembering stand heights would be a huge help.
Anyone with any tips or advice?
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
After years of experimentation with various setups and configurations - I think I finally have my "perfect" drum setup. That said, I have a 5' x 7' rug with stand and pedal locations taped off to remember exactly where everything goes. I have memory locks throughout all my Yamaha hardware (tom mounts mostly) but the one thing that is sorely lacking in the drum hardware world is a system for remembering how to consistently adjust cymbal stand heights and angles of booms.
Does anyone have a home-grown system for this? I have 4 stands and 3 of them collapse for transport but I would love to have a visual system for remembering the precise height of each stand. I would think someone would design stands with tiny lines or holes drilled vertically along the stand shaft(s) so that we could mark the desired height easily. Right now I use a Sharpie to mark the height which works well but only temporary as it eventually wears off.
Tape doesn't work because you can't collapse the stands when tape is wrapped around the shaft.
Call me anal (and yes I am aware I have used the words "shaft" and "anal" in the same post) but I like to setup and breakdown as quickly as possible and remembering stand heights would be a huge help.
Anyone with any tips or advice?
It is better to be anal retentive than anal expulsive! (Google Freud's theories; he was obviously high on cocaine when he came up with these ideas).

I would get a small metal file and gently grind away a bit of the chrome to mark the desired positions. It is less invasive than drilling.
 

Wavelength

Platinum Member
I like to setup and breakdown as quickly as possible and remembering stand heights would be a huge help.
Then memorise them! Eyeballing everything to their right places is the quickest way to setup a kit. You're not going to die if something's an inch off...
 

Pass.of.E.r.a.

Gold Member
I use one layer or elecrtical just below where the legs collaspe (pic below). all my cymbal stands are 1 tier stands and fortunately all the top parts have memory locks (Pearl CH-1000 in a Tama Roadpro Base), but you could do the same with the top if you take the cymbal stand apart to haul it around. Also if you have a two tier stand (and don't set up your cymbals super high) you could use one of the tiers as a memory lock, again provided that you take your stands apart.

-Jonathan
 

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Bigdumbdrums

Senior Member
Then memorise them! Eyeballing everything to their right places is the quickest way to setup a kit. You're not going to die if something's an inch off...
I do have them memorized for the most part - been playing for 33 years so I have a pretty good handle on it - but my situation is this: I have a 6 piece kit that is setup very tight (drums close together) with cymbals relatively low because;
A: that's how I like it
B: one of the band's I play in is a 7-piece with horn section and we sometimes play tight stages

I take up less than a 5' x 7' area and if a cymbal stand is 1" off, it's noticeable to me - and it's not aesthetics. My cymbals overlap the toms to a certain degree and if they overlap too much then they can accidentally hit during a fill.

So yeah - memory if what I have been using for 33 years but having memory locks for toms and other components work really well in terms of speed when setting up. I just want a good way to remember cymbal stand heights and I'm surprised drum hardware manufacturers have not yet developed a simple system built in to the stand to facilitate this. It seems like a no-brainer to me.
 

Bigdumbdrums

Senior Member
I use one layer or elecrtical just below where the legs collaspe (pic below). all my cymbal stands are 1 tier stands and fortunately all the top parts have memory locks (Pearl CH-1000 in a Tama Roadpro Base), but you could do the same with the top if you take the cymbal stand apart to haul it around. Also if you have a two tier stand (and don't set up your cymbals super high) you could use one of the tiers as a memory lock, again provided that you take your stands apart.

-Jonathan
The electrical tape works for the bottom legs since the legs won't interfere with the tape in anyway - memory locks are clearly the way to go and I may look into finding locks that fit my stands or consider the type of stand you mention here - thanks.
 

Bigdumbdrums

Senior Member
It is better to be anal retentive than anal expulsive! (Google Freud's theories; he was obviously high on cocaine when he came up with these ideas).

I would get a small metal file and gently grind away a bit of the chrome to mark the desired positions. It is less invasive than drilling.
That would work but I don't like the idea of scratching the chrome - that leads to oxidation/rust eventually. This is why I have been using a Sharpie. Thanks for the advice. It's what I think would work if the hardware developers notched their stands before chroming - that way we could measure visually how high/low we want our stands.
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
Larger hose clamps at the base below the legs are great for 2 reasons.
1. You can get them to size for the tune diam, and the ends don't stick out far at all.
2. They are not noticeable.
Honorable mention: They don't add any weight to the stand!

Gibraltar offers different sized memory locks (some with hinges) that would fit Yamaha stands.

I like a lot of hardware out there these days, but only a few companies offer integrated memory locks on the stands when you buy them.

Yamaha hasn't had memory locks on the cymbal stands, and I don't know why.
If they offer them I am unaware of it (haven't used their stuff in ages). I did notice they added one on the boom arm a few years ago.

Even if you used chrome hose clamps on all the tube sections, they aren't noticeable from a foot away, and it's very easy to cut any excess off that may stick out.
They don't have to look cheesy.
Just depends where you put the screw/tightener. Put them all in the same spot at the height adjustment, and it'll look like they are supposed to be there.

PLUS, they are really cheap!
 

ddrumman2004

Senior Member
Clamps are okay but the defeat the purpose of the telescoping feature of the stand.

I would continue to use the Sharpie or a permanent marker that has a wider tip and therefore won't rub off as quickly.

I am able to pack my cymbal stands away just by folding the booms and retracting the legs. The heights never have to be adjusted. I transport my stands in a SKB Microphone stand case. Has a handle on end and in the center with two wheels on the opposite plus straps inside to secure everything. Weighs a ton when filled with all my hardware, except pedal!
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
That would work but I don't like the idea of scratching the chrome - that leads to oxidation/rust eventually. This is why I have been using a Sharpie. Thanks for the advice. It's what I think would work if the hardware developers notched their stands before chroming - that way we could measure visually how high/low we want our stands.
You do not need to scratch away all of the chrome, just enough to leave a permanent mark. Carefully scratching away some of the chrome will absolutely not lead to rust - unless you play underwater a lot. Check out the inside of the stand tubes. There is no chroming at all.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Red finger nail polish. Draw a line across the tilter on both sides, and draw a line around the upper tube of the cymbal stands and around the lower tube where the leg assembly belongs when set up. Touch up as needed
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I used hose clamps everywhere that doesn't have a memory lock.

I used a coffin style case, so I only have to do minimal break down on my stands.

For angles, I found a small bit of nail polish works great. It won't wash off, and it won't fade. But if I ever need to make a change, a q-tip and nail polish remover will take it off. Neither harms the chrome finish.
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
You can't collapse a cymbal stand with hose clamps around it.
Yeah, that's true, if you use a short case, or need them taken down for transport, small car etc...
I just fold the legs on all my stands (hat stand too) because my case is tall enough (I also have a mini van).
I have the H&B Vulcanized fiber case with wheels (20 years and still going!) which isn't that heavy at all.
The Enduro that size? No thanks!

Small squares of plastic tape go inside tubes. Wrapped all the way around is a drag though.
The fat sharpie marker works great too.
you could use a sharpie and put a piece of clear tape on it (scotch tape). That stuff is thin enough to never cause a problem, and it protects the mark too.
Won't come off until you take it off.

I used to put numbers on top of the height adjustment area so I could see which stand was which also.
Now I just have 3 stands, and they are at different heights, so don't need that--or really mem locks either, unless some Bozo comes up and tries to "help".....which is what lead to memory locks on everything of mine in the first place...
 

Bigdumbdrums

Senior Member
You do not need to scratch away all of the chrome, just enough to leave a permanent mark. Carefully scratching away some of the chrome will absolutely not lead to rust - unless you play underwater a lot. Check out the inside of the stand tubes. There is no chroming at all.
Good point about the inside of the tubes :)
 

Bigdumbdrums

Senior Member
Red finger nail polish. Draw a line across the tilter on both sides, and draw a line around the upper tube of the cymbal stands and around the lower tube where the leg assembly belongs when set up. Touch up as needed
Nice - I suppose a quality metal paint (spray) like Rustoleum would work as well. Interesting ideas in this thread guys - thank to all who chimed in - I appreciate all the ideas.
 
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