CYMBAL REPAIRS / MODS

themazk

Member
Re: HELP!!!

Hey Guys,
I just found a crack in my Istanbul Agop 21in Jazz Ride. I really hope it is fixable. Some pics below.

Also, I bought this cymbal in August of 2011, so it's hardly a year old. The thing is is that I did drill two rivet holes (which I don't even use) - I did that literally the second week of october. For that reason I doubt that Istanbul or Maxwell's Drum Shop will accept a return. However, I honestly believe that the rivet drilling did nothing to the integrity of the cymbal; the crack is a few inches above the logo and the rivets are on the opposite side.

It definitely did not break from "over-playing" - it is located just off the bell.

Please help me guys, how do I fix/go about returning it? I have to record a college audition prescreening in less than a month and just found this crack today.

Thanks
Leo

From Bottom

From top

Crack is about 3-4in from Istanbul logo by bell. Notice rivet holes are on the opposite side.
That can be repaired permanently by TIG welding check out these big ass cracks I TIG welded in these cymbals...
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BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
What about the re-tempering that TIG would create? I've never seen it done because it may well increase the brittleness of the bronze alloy.
 

Arky

Platinum Member
TIG should definitely alter the material structure at those spots plus the areas around. Whether it's audible or not I can't tell. If it _is_ audible then to me there's no substantial benefit to cutting out cracks (although depending on where the cracks are).
 
T

The Old Hyde

Guest
This is a Zildjian A thin crash. Whoever cut it did a great job, its very smooth to tough the edje and it really sounds great. If you had a sound byte of the original I imagine there is a change to it but it really is a great playable cymbal. This is a practice studio kit, not mine, thats why the heads are so shot. Nice 24inch Zilco ride though. Ludwig Standard kit.
 

Attachments

Have any of you ever flipped a cymbal so the bell is punched in and the edges are up? I watched Chris Coleman do this to one of his 10" cymbals at a clinic in Ohio and I tried it with a 12" splash. It sounded great to my suprise!
 

AirborneSFC

Gold Member
So I found a used Byzance side ride at a great price! I got the cymbal and I could see somewhat why:

1. Very dirty and had a good layer of patina
2. A few flea bites on the edge of the cymbal

After doing a little reading I decided I would fix the flea bites and of course clean the cymbal up. So first I did was get my daughter ready for her nap. Next I tried a simple solution of dish soap and laundry soap. Since this ride had a sand blasted finish I was not sure if Groove Juice was good.

The first cleaning did not do much. I tried a small amount of Groove Juice. I guess Meinl must laser etch the design on because it was not affected by the cleaner. After about 30 minutes it was perfectly clean ( I will post before and after).

Next I used some blue masking tape to protect the areas I did not want to touch. First using some 180 Grit sand paper I sanded out slowly the flea bites. This works fast so go slow and be careful. Next I smoothed out with 600 grit. I then removed the tape. This of course revealed ever the slightest flat low area. I then visually and by feel evened it out slowly with 600 grit sand paper.

I finished up with another quick cleaning and now its like new. I will post some pictures later. I think this method would easily work with any other cymbals. Keep in mind my flea bites were directly on the edge; perhaps the ride was dropped. I did not want cracks to develop.

The end result is my cymbal looks new and perfectly smooth edges!
 

AirborneSFC

Gold Member
Here are the before and after pictures. I think its a 100% improvement. I have never been a fan of the green patina thing even though these are "vintage" cymbals.

Before







After







The repair was to the upper left of the cymbal but I think you would be hard pressed to know it ever happened.
 

5against4

Junior Member
Ofcourse ANY repair is gonna change the cymbal sound, but TIG welding seems to be the least altering of the available repairing methods. Check out my youtube vids, I know they are recorded with an Ipod ,but you can hear the quality of the cymbals sound for the most part, though I admit they sound better in person than the Ipod records them lol.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYf1nDoJDwM&feature=plcp

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JV7_hAyPXzk&feature=plcp
Yeah, wow, I'm wondering how long you've played on these and how they've held up?
I have a welder, ...and broken cymabls, this could get real fun!!
I've made five ozones out of broken cymbals, but never thought about doing this!!
 

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
Well, I have a 20" A Custom Ride and a 21" Sweet Ride.

I want to make one or maybe both of these into a O-zone esque type of cymbal.

I currently use these both as crashes and I don't like how bright and loud the A Custom is.

If I drilled a bunch of holes in these, which one would make the better ozone type crash Im looking for?

(Think Dave Grohl's cymbal set from Them Crooked Vultures.)
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Well, I have a 20" A Custom Ride and a 21" Sweet Ride.

I want to make one or maybe both of these into a O-zone esque type of cymbal.

I currently use these both as crashes and I don't like how bright and loud the A Custom is.

If I drilled a bunch of holes in these, which one would make the better ozone type crash Im looking for?

(Think Dave Grohl's cymbal set from Them Crooked Vultures.)

I would really, really advise against it. I did it to some old junk cymbals.
The results were OK, but not great. I'll never use those cymbals.
In another thread, you were talking about a shop that has a K cymbal you were interested in getting.
I think you'd be much better off seeing what you could work out with them in regards to some kind of trade.
I'm thinking the end result of drilling a bunch of holes is probably not going to result in what you're thinking it will.
And if that's the case, you won't get much for them. Much better off selling or trading.
 
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bearblastbeats

Senior Member
I would really, really advise against it. I did it to some old junk cymbals, which you can see here: http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1043866&postcount=116

The results were OK, but not great. I'll never use those cymbals. In another thread, you were talking about a shop that has a K cymbal you were interested in getting. I think you'd be much better off seeing what you could work out with them in regards to some kind of trade.
I'm thinking the end result of drilling a bunch of holes is probably not going to result in what you're thinking it will. And if that's the case, you won't get much for them. Much better off selling or trading.

They quoted me not very much all ready. and Since I got the A Custom New for only paying $14 shipping I didn't care much to customize it a little.. I've drilled holes in cymbals before to relieve cracks but this time I was thinking actual bigger holes.

The shop wants 200 for the 20" K ride (used) and like $220 for the new 17", I really don't want to no can I really spend money

They were going to give me $120 for the A Custom (new) and probably much less for the Sweet Ride.
 

themazk

Member
Here's an old Sabian B8 Pro 18" medium crash that I had retired last year. I broke it a few times and welded it too lol. Today I used my hammer a block of wood and 30 minutes to make a really nice sounding china crash,I'll get a sound check vid up soon but here are some pics!

 
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