Cymbal Center Hole

vtran711

Well-known member
I just purchased this used cymbal and noticed a small ding in the center hole. Is this something I need to worry about? Cymbal sounds great so I'd like to keep it but if this can potentially get worse I do have 30 days to return.

cymbal.JPG
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I'd leave it as is. There's not much to be done. If it sounds fine now, don't worry about it. Just make sure the thread of your stand is protected to prevent further damage.
 
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johnwesley

Silver Member
Just as Mr Jones said. Keep a sleeve on the threads through the hole And Do Not Use the cymbal when playing Rhinoceros metal.
 

Noisy

Well-known member
Actually, I hope someone with more knowledge speaks up. It maybe better to smooth out that ding so it doesn’t start a large crack. Right now, as it is played, it could catch against the plastic sleeve and bind. The pressure could start a crack.

It is better to return it if you don’t lose much.

If you’re keeping it, think about sanding it out until you have a smoother and wider indent.

I think someone with more experience should be consulted.
 

Noisy

Well-known member
I’m not sure if a brass grommet is better but here is a Home Depot solution:

References to here:

Any opinions?

I still don’t like the idea of a sharp angle like shown in the picture but maybe I am overly paranoid.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I’m not sure if a brass grommet is better but here is a Home Depot solution:

References to here:

Any opinions?

I still don’t like the idea of a sharp angle like shown in the picture but maybe I am overly paranoid.
The flaw in question is of negligible import. Ensuring that the cymbal is henceforth handled and mounted with care is the best strategy. Chips near the mounting hole aren't unusual. Generally, they don't worsen when future precautions are taken. If they do, hope is never lost. You can always attain a new cymbal. Nothing material is eternal.
 

vtran711

Well-known member
Thanks everyone. All my stands have plastic sleeves but I'm going to take @Noisy advice and sand the hole smooth. May not be needed but I'm a bit paranoid too.

Definitely keeping the cymbal. I was using a single 16" which I love but now adding this 18" I prefer the warmer tone and longer decay. The 16" now seems a little too bright but they compliment each other well. I placed the 18" inch near the hihat as my primary crash and the 16" moved to the right next to the ride.
 

Ghostin one

Senior Member
I doubt it would become an issue. A few strokes with a round file of similar diameter would clean it up quickly. Or maybe emery cloth (or even sandpaper) wrapped around an old drum stick...

Grombals are good for this situation, but I don't like to use them on 8mm stands, except for splash cymbals.

Some Zildjian concert crashes used to come with grommets installed at the factory.
 

ToneT

Well-known member
According to The Cymbal Book (1992, Hugo Pinksterboer, Hal Leonard Publishing). . . .

A rough hole will wear out a cymbal sleeve in no time, it is wise to finish off such a flaw.

If there is a point of metal sticking out into the hole, use a smooth file to remove it. Be careful not to file the hole out of round.
Miner flaws can be removed using waterproof sandpaper, twisted around a screwdriver.

Existing "keyholes" (out of round holes) can be disguised and prevented from growing by inserting a metal grommet.

And, happy 4th everyone!
 

roncadillac

Member
If it's not a rare/expensive cymbal I would drill it out. Not like making a notch or dramatic increase in diameter but just enough to even it out and prevent 'growth'. Modern cymbal holes are 8mm (if I remember correctly) so I would use a 9mm drill bit. It will have a negligible difference in its feel and swing on the stand and should have no difference in sound. Rubber grommets work but will wear out over time and metal grommets eventually rattle, both metal and rubber will slightly reduce your sustain. Simply drilling the whole 1mm larger will fix the problem with no negative impact and I doubt even the most experienced of drummers could look at it and say, "wait a second... Is that center hole bigger?"
 
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