Cymbal Box Sets

I'm a new forum member who has not bought new cymbals in many years. I was hoping to get some opinions on buying pre-boxed cymbal sets, particularly cast cymbals. It seems to me, that, this sort of option defeats the purpose of hand selecting one's cymbals and having indiviual instruments to suit one's own tastes. Do any of the members here have any experience with buying cast cymbals in pre-selected box sets and what is your take on buying cymbals this way? Is there really any money savings with such a purchase? Thanks in advance.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
There may be an advantage to buying a boxed set if it was to include say a cymbal bag or an extra item for the same price as buying the cymbals individually. I'm not sure what style of music you play or what your sound requirements may be, but if I needed a new set of cymbals that were offered in a boxed set I wouldn't hesitate to purchase these:
http://memphisdrumshop.com/index.php?main_page=advanced_search_result&search_in_description=0&keyword=paiste+limited+edition+box+set&x=0&y=0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jv1vFjtAzYk
 
There may be an advantage to buying a boxed set if it was to include say a cymbal bag or an extra item for the same price as buying the cymbals individually. I'm not sure what style of music you play or what your sound requirements may be, but if I needed a new set of cymbals that were offered in a boxed set I wouldn't hesitate to purchase these:
http://memphisdrumshop.com/index.php?main_page=advanced_search_result&search_in_description=0&keyword=paiste+limited+edition+box+set&x=0&y=0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jv1vFjtAzYk
Thank you Jeremy. I am more concerned about a selection of cast cymbals vs. sheet metal cymbas, which tend to be more consistent in sound. I would be using these in a cover band, Jazz/Rock setting that would require moderate volume and a tonal range that would be versitale.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
I didn't ask about returns for a couple reasons. First - I knew I'd be keeping them.
And I also traded in something to get them. So that kind of complicates things too.

The savings are pretty substantial. Easy enough to figure out - just add up their individual selling prices and compare them to the price you're seeing on the pack.

Of course, it was a bit of a gamble, not having heard them.

And there's also the fact that you might not go out looking for each of those specific cymbals. I didn't really need the hats, but wanted another of those rides, and was looking for some new crashes.
Buying the ride and those crashes individually would have cost me more than what the pack cost.
I wasn't too sure about the crashes at first. My previous ones are heavier. But the more I use them, the more I like them.

So you've got to consider the trade-offs, and see if you think it's worth them.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
Thank you Jeremy. I am more concerned about a selection of cast cymbals vs. sheet metal cymbas, which tend to be more consistent in sound. I would be using these in a cover band, Jazz/Rock setting that would require moderate volume and a tonal range that would be versitale.
Okay I gotcha on the musical needs now, but not sure what you mean by cast vs.sheet. (Just to let you know the Paiste cymbals I mentioned are indeed cast and not to derail the thread, but here's some info from the makers themselves: http://www.paiste.com/e/about_alloys.php?menuid=314 )
Keep us informed as to what you decide to get!
 
A

audiotech

Guest
In my opinion, it all depends on how critical you are with your sound. It's not like these companies push out duds, what happens a majority of the time is that one or two of the cymbals may not quite match the others in terms of sound. If you pick each cymbal individually, you're able to pick and choose as you wish. Say maybe a 16" Medium thin crash sounds a little high pitched compared to the others ion the pack, I would try a 16" Thin crash just to see if they sound a bit better when I'm choosing individually. There is a hugh tolerance factor when it comes to manufacturing cymbals, particularly from Zildjian and Sabian. In other words, pick five cymbals with the exact same model and size and good chances are that they're all going to sound a bit different. This is why I say about being critical with their sound. No question about it that you will save money buying the box sets and you might be able to re-sell the cymbals that you don't care for, but you will also loose money doing this. I've hand picked every cymbal I own, sometimes going to two or three well stocked shops to find exactly what I want.

Dennis
 

ohiodrummer1964

Senior Member
In my opinion, it all depends on how critical you are with your sound. It's not like these companies push out duds, what happens a majority of the time is that one or two of the cymbals may not quite match the others in terms of sound. If you pick each cymbal individually, you're able to pick and choose as you wish. Say maybe a 16" Medium thin crash sounds a little high pitched compared to the others ion the pack, I would try a 16" Thin crash just to see if they sound a bit better when I'm choosing individually. There is a hugh tolerance factor when it comes to manufacturing cymbals, particularly from Zildjian and Sabian. In other words, pick five cymbals with the exact same model and size and good chances are that they're all going to sound a bit different. This is why I say about being critical with their sound. No question about it that you will save money buying the box sets and you might be able to re-sell the cymbals that you don't care for, but you will also loose money doing this. I've hand picked every cymbal I own, sometimes going to two or three well stocked shops to find exactly what I want.

Dennis
I've been thinking about a boxed set of Zildjian A's, and selling one that I wouldn't need for me set. I think your statement about loosing money re-selling the cymbals that you don't care would be true if you end up selling 2 or 3 of them. However, if you only sell one, and take into consideration how much of a savings you're getting on it by buying it in a boxed set to begin with, you may not end up losing money on it. That probably depends on how much you get from it, seeing as the economy's still bad and cymbals are going cheap these days.
 
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