Cymbal blending

Auspicious

Well-known member
I am about to do to something crazy! if you want to intervene, now is the time.

The Turkish Cymbal Company replied to me with an offer to ship to me a 19" Turkish crash medium thin in the classic series (I have a 17" of the same model exactly.)

--> I am about to put my confidence in them to pick a 19" for me, that will match my 17" according to my video, a 19" with crash ride capabilities.

This one from youtube, is pretty similar to my 17" in tone.. for somewhat reason my confidence is kind of high.


Hit me with your opinion now.
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Quote ["17" K Custom Dark Crash - bright attack with a dark wash; quick to activate * same cymbal comes from the rock set up ** this actually becomes the ride when I have brushes. It sound so perfect wiht brushes for what we do"] QUOTE

When I had to start using brushes, (I'm something of a beginner) I found that they wouldn't actually activate hihats or crashes so I switched to high dynamic thick nylon brushes which do.
So how do you use your brushes? Are you striking the cymbal with the metal butt end rather than with the brush itself?
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Yes we are all members of the same religion-and we like a variety of cymbals like we do wives-so I'm thinking we maybe More- man. Ya man gimme more cymbals man. My bad. Finding a cymbal I guess is like finding a mate-you kiss a lot of frogs before you find one that makes you hop or you don't want to hop away from.
that is hilarious..and a great observation.

AND, in a way, you are going to church...the church of music!!
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Music is like a religion-we are all true believers-there is heaven and hell in drumming-Hey there's a Drumming Bible even-so its bone fide official for sure. Lots of preachers on here and lots of followers. Course just like religion some preachers can be snake oil salesman and may lead you astray then you find yourself in drummer hell. I think the Drumming Bible says "Test the Spirits" so I'm assuming that means shots-so it's not all anti-alcohol. There is no afterlife cause you can't play drums dead. So the heaven and hell part is while living. Once you drop the sticks the last time no more picking up sticks. So let's make the best of playing while we can-dead men tell no lies nor play drums-oops I corrected a double negative.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
Music is like a religion-we are all true believers-there is heaven and hell in drumming-Hey there's a Drumming Bible even-so its bone fide official for sure. Lots of preachers on here and lots of followers. Course just like religion some preachers can be snake oil salesman and may lead you astray then you find yourself in drummer hell. I think the Drumming Bible says "Test the Spirits" so I'm assuming that means shots-so it's not all anti-alcohol. There is no afterlife cause you can't play drums dead. So the heaven and hell part is while living. Once you drop the sticks the last time no more picking up sticks. So let's make the best of playing while we can-dead men tell no lies nor play drums-oops I corrected a double negative.
o_O

Maybe our conscience is transferred elsewhere, it's not hard to believe in a positive afterlife instead of believing that there is nothing.... We have many stories of people clinically dead on the operation table, I think for a specific brain trauma where they need to stop the blood flow in order to save the person life, the only way is to kill the person in order to perform the operation. He or she is going to die anyway, a very critical state.

For many hours the machines would pick no life signs out of the patient then the doctors will reanimate the person after they are finished draining the blood around the brain (or something like that)

Yet, these dead people say they had their consciousnesses the whole time, for many hours, in the white tunnel of light meeting with relative and etc.

Perhaps a gateway to another dimension.
 

bongoman

Junior Member
I am about to do to something crazy! if you want to intervene, now is the time.

The Turkish Cymbal Company replied to me with an offer to ship to me a 19" Turkish crash medium thin in the classic series (I have a 17" of the same model exactly.)

--> I am about to put my confidence in them to pick a 19" for me, that will match my 17" according to my video, a 19" with crash ride capabilities.

This one from youtube, is pretty similar to my 17" in tone.. for somewhat reason my confidence is kind of high.


Hit me with your opinion now.
Roll the dice, you might win.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
Roll the dice, you might win.
I think the odds are high, don't know what's happening, my confidence when purchasing things increased lately. I bought a mattress last week and it was an easy task to pick the right one directly, my mattress is exactly perfect for my back.

With that 19" cymbal, I feel the same way, at least according to the audio sample, it's blending with my 17" without any puzzles or anything.

--> An e-mail was sent to get a shipping price evaluation already.

I have a good confidence that it's going to be a very high quality cymbal and sound, perhaps even better then in that sound sample.
 

Neal Pert

Well-known member
I recently decided to make a big change from one brand to another-- like, sell all the cymbals I've been playing and invest that money into a new (to me) set of sounds. I went with the Paiste Masters series because I love the range of sounds and I know that they'll be consistent. I live about 4 hours from a well-stocked drum shop and the problem of buying cymbals online has been pretty vexing for me. If I ever need something brighter than the Masters-- which I probably won't, tbh-- I'd probably just look at the brighter Paiste lines at this point-- maybe some 2002s or some of the mellower Signature series. The seemingly good thing about the Paiste lines is that they have really designed them to blend well together within the lines. I think the other companies have been doing this, too. Like, Zildjian's new As all work together. So do the K Sweets. The Bosphorus Syncopation Series work really well together. In my middle age I've thought of building sets from within particular cymbal lines and I've not been disappointed.

But, like, check out this video.

YouTube has made it a lot easier to match cymbals, though, as has the proliferation of information about cymbal weights and such. And looking at the cymbal setups of drummers I like can help, too.

BTW, I almost always buy used cymbals, and I wait until I find the price I can stomach.
 

Jml

Senior Member
I just found a small crack in my Paiste Giant Beat 18” thin crash. Not sure they break so easily and I’m not a hard hitter, but there you are. So I’m thinking about replacing it with something from another brand. Maybe try Zildjians? Should I try to find something that matches the Giant Beat sound or something totally different?
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
I recently decided to make a big change from one brand to another-- like, sell all the cymbals I've been playing and invest that money into a new (to me) set of sounds. I went with the Paiste Masters series because I love the range of sounds and I know that they'll be consistent. I live about 4 hours from a well-stocked drum shop and the problem of buying cymbals online has been pretty vexing for me. If I ever need something brighter than the Masters-- which I probably won't, tbh-- I'd probably just look at the brighter Paiste lines at this point-- maybe some 2002s or some of the mellower Signature series. The seemingly good thing about the Paiste lines is that they have really designed them to blend well together within the lines. I think the other companies have been doing this, too. Like, Zildjian's new As all work together. So do the K Sweets. The Bosphorus Syncopation Series work really well together. In my middle age I've thought of building sets from within particular cymbal lines and I've not been disappointed.

But, like, check out this video.

YouTube has made it a lot easier to match cymbals, though, as has the proliferation of information about cymbal weights and such. And looking at the cymbal setups of drummers I like can help, too.

BTW, I almost always buy used cymbals, and I wait until I find the price I can stomach.

I followed a very different path, I picked a nice ride first in a store, by the sound, then I found my crash second hand, I loved the sound of both directly, it's my unique authentic sound, this can't be replaced by something else.

But I understand the logic behind consistence and buying a set of the same model, it's a much easier path without a doubt to get high results.

But then again, I am attracted so much by the idea of getting unique and authentic pieces and blend them myself, it's a harder path but it's going to be in tune with what I like exactly without any external influence.
 

Neal Pert

Well-known member
I followed a very different path, I picked a nice ride first in a store, by the sound, then I found my crash second hand, I loved the sound of both directly, it's my unique authentic sound, this can't be replaced by something else.

But I understand the logic behind consistence and buying a set of the same model, it's a much easier path without a doubt to get high results.

But then again, I am attracted so much by the idea of getting unique and authentic pieces and blend them myself, it's a harder path but it's going to be in tune with what I like exactly without any external influence.

Yeah, I absolutely get that. That's how I did it when I was younger and, well, more urban. The older I get, the more "matchy" I want to be. I'm not 100% sure why that is, but it's become true for cymbals, drums, hardware, and even cases.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
My cymbal set-ups are inspired by Jack DeJohnette recordings during the 70s and 80s...
I like brighter sounding crashes with darker rides, a nice whispery flat ride, and larger, obnoxious chinas.
Larrie Londin was using some Dejohnettes in a DVD that sounded sweet!. IMO Sabians formulas just hit the right spot with hi-hat cymbals.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
Yeah, I absolutely get that. That's how I did it when I was younger and, well, more urban. The older I get, the more "matchy" I want to be. I'm not 100% sure why that is, but it's become true for cymbals, drums, hardware, and even cases.
Ok, I suspect it can be related to better finances..

it's less likely for a 22 years old to buy a whole set of Paiste Dark Energy for instance... they are simply too expensive to start.. the person might want to build 1 part at the time.. following the budget, just to realize eventually that, these parts don't really match.

In my case.. it's just for fun really..

With 2 cymbals I already complain about the space it takes, 3 is kind of the ultimate limit for large cymbals... but.. I really want an accent reverse chinese along with a string of small cymbals..
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Quote ["17" K Custom Dark Crash - bright attack with a dark wash; quick to activate * same cymbal comes from the rock set up ** this actually becomes the ride when I have brushes. It sound so perfect wiht brushes for what we do"] QUOTE

When I had to start using brushes, (I'm something of a beginner) I found that they wouldn't actually activate hihats or crashes so I switched to high dynamic thick nylon brushes which do.
So how do you use your brushes? Are you striking the cymbal with the metal butt end rather than with the brush itself?

nope...using the metal brushes...the Jeff Hamilton brushes...the wire is a bit heavier than normal brushes...but the 17" K Custom Dark Crash speaks unbelievably well in that usage...better than any cymbal I have ever tried. The only other cymbal I like brushes on is my 1948ish Zildjian 18" with rivets
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I like brushes on cymbals, it produces a nice sound for the ear.

yep...but it has to be the right cymbal for the musical setting...it took me years to firn the rihght brush/cymbal combo

and I was making the mistake of going bigger and thinner for the cymbal...it took me trying the 17 K Dark Custom Crash on accident to have the "ah-ha" moment...
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
I try to keep them in the same family, but models within the family can vary.
When I shop, I'll bring at least 2 crashes & my ride along to see how the prospect will or won't fit in.

It's been a good system so far.
 
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