Current drum trends you wish would go away

Multi-ply drums. They are the McDonald’s of the drum world. They’re everywhere, boring, and uninspiring.

We’ve got lighter kits (Oriollo aluminum), moisture-proof and tougher kits (Jenkins-Martin fiberglass), and single-ply kits (N&C, Craviotto, etc.), and even a few hollow-log kits (although those are not practical for gigging out). All of those sound as good as multi-ply, and most of them sound better. And the aluminum and fiberglass kits could easily be (especially aluminum) produced cheaper than multi-ply kits if it were done on a larger scale.
I love this!!! Every drummer on Earth playing a Craviotto would certainly make the world sound better. I'm way over singers who have their own drum on stage that they hit on 1 and 3 every once in a while. A certain cymbal company that doesn't own a foundry or any physical property at all. I won't name names (Dream Cymbals). Who outsources their cymbals from China and has millions of fifteen year old "endorsers". Also these same fifteen year olds calling themselves "endorsed by" said cymbal company. And nobody should be getting their panties in a wad here. I play big drums set up very flat with huge cymbals also set up flat. They are very expensive ply drums with two ply batter heads and yet I'm not insulted. I do not however have 16" hi-hats, because that would be stupid. Have a little fun!
 
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Mustion

Senior Member
Who outsources their cymbals from China and has millions of fifteen year old "endorsers". Also these same fifteen year olds calling themselves "endorsed by" said cymbal company.
Oooh this is a good one. These usually exploitative, hollow endorsement deals are really a blight indeed.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Current drum trends you wish would go away:

Drummers complaining about other drummer's just because they are different.

Seriously.....
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
I can't think of a gear trend that bothers me enough to mention. However a playing trend I won't miss when it goes away is metal guys riding on a china.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
True! And now we have drummers tilting them far away.
There was an interview with Anika Niles where she said she tilted hers away, because the way she hit them, they needed to be tilted in that direction to sound right. Well before it became hip, I used to do that with my Wuhan, because it gave it longer sustain if I could hit it in the right spot. If not, it was super short, which was kinda cool too.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
That's a rare thing, tilting the cymbals back.
Only a few oddball dingdongs do it, but I think drummers like Anika and Ben Sesar do it for a personal Kansei ergonomic adaption.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Really tall bass drums, with the rack tom mounted way off the the left.

I like the rack tom to be almost above the bass pedal, certainly near the centre of the drum, not away to the left where my crash cymbal should be.

If I angle my body to the left to reach the rack tom, then the floor tom sits behind me. Annoying.
 

jimzo

Senior Member
Really tall bass drums, with the rack tom mounted way off the the left.

I like the rack tom to be almost above the bass pedal, certainly near the centre of the drum, not away to the left where my crash cymbal should be.

If I angle my body to the left to reach the rack tom, then the floor tom sits behind me. Annoying.
well then... that counts out Bo, myself, and several of the the others.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
This thread is hilarious. I'm definitely guilty of some of the crimes listed here.

I'm not telling which ones. But I am a DW criminal apparently.

Time for me to go on the lam, crap.

On 2nd thought, since I'll be forever on the lam, I will confess my crimes.

It may shed a little light on why this is done by some.

My cymbals look flat from the throne. They don't seem tilted away from me while I'm sitting at the throne. But from the audience, they look slightly tilted away from me. But from my perspective on the throne, they look flat.

I have a certain cymbal technique where I don't crash the cymbal hard, instead, I use a softer glancing swipe on the very edge, as opposed to smashing it. It gets more volume with less force that way. I'm going for the less force part. I only use maybe 60% of the available cymbal volume. (crashing) In addition, I prefer the sound much better that way. I can hit with much more efficiency (energy-wise) when the edge is flat and stupid easy to access. It blooms nicer and is simply more responsive to edge swipes. Plus if I really want volume...a flat cymbal decays more evenly than a tilted cymbal. I feel the flatter a cymbal is, the more volume it can produce, with less stress on the cymbal hole too.

If someone has a problem with my flat or slightly tilted away from me cymbals, they are the one with the problem. I play how I need to play.
 
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Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
For me, I find nothing evil or stupid or whatever. I see ingenuity, originality. The drummer is an individual. I don't have to play like you, or set my kit up like Neil or have my toms centered just right.

My point is, why do you care about how and what others are playing? Like my Buddy Rich quote in my sig, I learn from ALL drummers man. I may not like it, but I'll learn from it. Maybe how to do something a little different that fits me and my style.

I saw someone here who posted a vid. And he was playing traditional with his right hand. Which, in all honestly isn't traditional at all. I'm a righty, I used to do this ALL the time when I first started playing and learning. Simply because, it came naturally to me. But I was ridiculed in school by teachers and more accomplished drummers. I was going to ask the guy if anyone here gave him crap because of his stick style.

People told Jimi he could NOT turn that guitar upside down and play it. It'll never work.. . . . . .boy, were they wrong.

Hell, if I want to angle my cymbals just to the right by 3.5876 degrees, I will. This thread is silly.
 

Erberderber

Senior Member
For me, I find nothing evil or stupid or whatever. I see ingenuity, originality. The drummer is an individual. I don't have to play like you, or set my kit up like Neil or have my toms centered just right.

My point is, why do you care about how and what others are playing? Like my Buddy Rich quote in my sig, I learn from ALL drummers man. I may not like it, but I'll learn from it. Maybe how to do something a little different that fits me and my style.

I saw someone here who posted a vid. And he was playing traditional with his right hand. Which, in all honestly isn't traditional at all. I'm a righty, I used to do this ALL the time when I first started playing and learning. Simply because, it came naturally to me. But I was ridiculed in school by teachers and more accomplished drummers. I was going to ask the guy if anyone here gave him crap because of his stick style.

People told Jimi he could NOT turn that guitar upside down and play it. It'll never work.. . . . . .boy, were they wrong.

Hell, if I want to angle my cymbals just to the right by 3.5876 degrees, I will. This thread is silly.
I think you're missing the point slightly here. I think what annoys a lot of posters in this thread is that many drummers follow a trend not because it suits them, but just because the other cool drummers are doing this and so they too want to be cool without thinking for themselves.

So yes, I agree with you that you should be able to do what you want with your drums and be as original as you want, but set them up according to your own wants, needs and tastes, not just because the cool kid of the moment is doing it.

All of that said, it can be fun finding out about people's little gripes, however irrational and unnecessary they appear to be.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
That doesn't make them better.
The sound is definitely better, you can really hear the voice of the wood, and the note is shorter too, which is good for recording. They’re just not practical for gigging, though. Way too responsive to humidity, prone to warping and cracking and shrinking if they go through extreme humidity changes.
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
Nothing is really current ,it's just the fashion changing for the sake of fashions sake.

The oversized bass drum trend over these past years does bug me though.

Kind of like bell bottoms and skinny jeans.

I read a book called I can sell you anything back in college and the Madison Avenue techniques are still alive and well in the drum biz.
 

evilg99

Platinum Member
I wish the trend of these kind of threads would go away.
No, really.

Play what you like, what inspires you and stop worrying and/or caring about what others like or don't.
Jeeeeezus.

There are lots of things I don't like. Pay them no attention and move on. See? Easy.
 

jimb

Member
Oh well might as well bite.
Super tight sounding snare drums that crack like a starting pistol....much prefer a softer snare with a bit of tone to it...
 
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