Craviotto Worth The Money?

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I'll chime in. It depends. I would say no. It depends on what you do - if you're gigging alot and need stuff to stand up to the rigors, then sure. But if you play out less frequently, it'll be like having a Ferrari that you keep in the garage.

There are alot of kits out there that I would go for before a Craviotto. And I only say that because it doesn't matter what I play, I tend to make every kit I play no sound the same. It's weird. Cheap, expensive, wood, acrylic, I tend to sound the same on all of them.
 

_Mark

Member
I play mainly around the house but I want a good kit.
That kit could last my whole life. If I didn't get that I'll get SJC or Ludwig.
I played a Craviotto snare once and I couldn't believe the sound. I thought Ludwig sounded good, but it was just ridiculously amazing.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Are they well made custom drums? Yes, very much so.

However if it's worth the extremely high cost, that's entirely subjective, and up to your own pocket book.
 

Kenny Allyn

Senior Member
You know I was over at MDS just the other day ...

One of the subjects that came up with one of the guys was how much money folks put into gear, the consensus between us was how little you really have to spend to have a good sounding and durable rig. I have a buddy one of the best drummers I know here in Memphis that has had and gigged with the same kit since the mid 70s ... he just last Summer replaced the cymbal stands that came with the kit. This guy gigs on a regular basis and has since 1965! He makes the kit sound great and is an A list first call guy. His kit is a Pearl Export series.

I would say get what you want and will be happy with ... but don't delude yourself into thinking a multi-thousand dollar kit is the end all-be all. I play bass on a pro level and have several one of a kind custom basses made just for me, and a couple of box stock Fenders. but you know I sound pretty much the same on my $200.00 parts Jazz Bass, and it is what I actually use on tuff outdoor and road gigs.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Agree w/ Kenny...You can get a great sounding shellpack for considerably less than 1000 brand new.
Any brand you can name can be made to sound great. The tolerances, equipment, precision is so much better now...you almost can't buy a bad drumkit. I'd stay away from sound percussion and groove percussion because of the cheap hardware but an inexpensive kit can absolutely produce a great sound in the right hands.
Craviotti makes great drums. If you can afford it, great, but another less expensive kit will last you your whole life too and can sound just as great.

I could take a Crav kit and tune it so it sounds really bad, and I can take a Groove Percussion kit and tune it so it sounds really good. If I did that and you heard them side by side, you'd think Crav's suck, which everyone knows they don't, and you'd think the GP is an awesome sounding kit, at a stupid low price.
I paid way too much for my drums and won't do that again, it's not justified. It's mostly vanity.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Agree w/ Kenny...You can get a great sounding shellpack for considerably less than 1000 brand new.
Any brand you can name can be made to sound great. The tolerances, equipment, precision is so much better now...you almost can't buy a bad drumkit. I'd stay away from sound percussion and groove percussion because of the cheap hardware but an inexpensive kit can absolutely produce a great sound in the right hands.
Craviotti makes great drums. If you can afford it, great, but another less expensive kit will last you your whole life too and can sound just as great.

I could take a Crav kit and tune it so it sounds really bad, and I can take a Groove Percussion kit and tune it so it sounds really good. If I did that and you heard them side by side, you'd think Crav's suck, which everyone knows they don't, and you'd think the GP is an awesome sounding kit, at a stupid low price.
I paid way too much for my drums and won't do that again, it's not justified. It's mostly vanity.
This is very true. Lots of times vanity plays a big part in what we buy. However, as I said that it's a practical matter, it depends on what you do. I pretty much make every kit sound the same, regardless of cost and build. But if you are always gigging, the higher quality will always win out because you don't need things breaking down while out on the road. If you gig occasionally you can get away with a nice mid-level kit, or a used semi-pro kit. I've played cheap-o Kent drums circa 1969 and made them sound great. I paid $100 for the drums, and did a $1000 week-long gig with it.

But I don't want to argue that you should get something cheaper. If you really like the Cravs, then that's what you should get. What you buy has to be inspiring to you, or you won't play them as much (I now, it sounds shallow, but go with it for a moment). If the Cravs are inspiring, then get a set! It'll probably be the last set you ever buy. However, I don't believe that either!
 

Skulmoski

Gold Member
There are very good arguments for yay or nay. If you do purchase a Craviotto set, then there are many benefits to be realized:
1) You will enjoy playing a great set day in and day out. If you are like me, playing a top level instrument is immensely enjoying!
2) You will not have to go through the upgrade shuffle as much as someone purchasing an intermediate kit, then upgrading it a few times. Their total outlay will likely be more than your Craviotto purchase.
3) If you ever want to sell your kit in 20 - 40 years, you will likely sell it for more than you paid for it if you have looked after it. (Have you seen the prices of vintage Gretsch kits!?!)

That said, there are lots of great kits out there for half of the price of a Craviotto. With proper tuning, these less expensive kits will also sound awesome!

I am currently looking for a high end kit and I am also considering a Craviotto, Gretsch, C&C, etc. I just have to have that important financial discussion with my better half! I am puttng away a bit of money each month to soften the financial impact of purchasing my next kit.

Good luck with what ever kit you buy!

GJS
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
2) You will not have to go through the upgrade shuffle as much as someone purchasing an intermediate kit, then upgrading it a few times. Their total outlay will likely be more than your Craviotto purchase.
But what of those people (like me) who buy top-grade kits every time? I'm not bragging, but the only mid-level kit I ever bought was a Sonor Force 3007, everything else, besides the aforementioned Kent drumset was top notch. So you may never upgrade, but that doesn't mean you won't want to move sideways.... I've moved sideways now at least ten times during my so-called career!
 

Skulmoski

Gold Member
But what of those people (like me) who buy top-grade kits every time? I'm not bragging, but the only mid-level kit I ever bought was a Sonor Force 3007, everything else, besides the aforementioned Kent drumset was top notch. So you may never upgrade, but that doesn't mean you won't want to move sideways.... I've moved sideways now at least ten times during my so-called career!
You are probably the exception; most people do not start out buying top-grade kits. You must have shuffled sideways through some nice kits Bo Eder!

Take care

GJS
 

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
Craviottos are steam bend shells and that sets them apart from most other kits. For me it comes down to pride of ownership. You'd own something that is unique. For some folks it's worth the money. For others it it isn't.

If you have the money go for it. You'd have a kit that you'd be proud of for the rest of your life.
 

ddrumman2004

Senior Member
I don't know much about the drums you inquire about other than I could never justify the cost myself. But that's me.
I have a Pearl Master's MRX kit as well as a 90s Pearl Export that I gig with. The Master's stay at home. Drums get awful dirty when being played out somewhere.

I expect to hand the Masters kit down to my grandson someday.

But it's your decision on those drums and good luck with your decision...whatever it is.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I think Bo said it best...They have to inspire you. Hopefully you can play them before you purchase.
But really...When you play the drums in a store or wherever, what's the chances that those drums have the same heads you use? And what's the chances that they are tuned how you like them?...Not good. It's hard to tell what they will sound like after YOUR personalizations. Plus all the drums around them are sympathetically vibrating and it definitely does influence what you hear....they sound fuller and bigger than if they were in a room all by themselves.
Buying drums is much harder than buying almost any other instrument, because its a PITA to change heads and tune them. They probably wouldn't let you do that anyway.
I think it's fair to say that, for instance, a set of Pearl drums can sound just as good, and last just as long, and be just as reliable as Crav's for a fraction of the price. Great, as long as the Pearls inspire you. But 400% more money for the Crav's doesn't return 400% better sound, far from it. After all it's just a simple membraneophone. The membrane is most of the sound.
 

zambizzi

Platinum Member
No way in hell I'd fork out over 6 grand for a little 4 pc. kit like that. Egads. I paid $800 for the Renowns I'm playing right now and they're right up there w/ the best sounding drums on the planet. I had a Craviotto/DW snare and I thought it had a really boring, uninspiring sound. I sold it and made money on it...it's all in the name!

Not knocking your choice - do what makes you happy. This is just my opinion.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I have a Pearl Master's MRX kit as well as a 90s Pearl Export that I gig with. The Master's stay at home. Drums get awful dirty when being played out somewhere.
No offense, but I still don't understand this mentality. The reason you have nice drums is to take them out and play them. You don't keep the Ferrari in the garage and just drive your aging pickup or whatever. Professional level drums were meant to be taken out and gotten dirty and played. Hell, groups take grand pianos and Hammond B3 organs on the road....

If you bought them for some kind of investment to leave to your grandchildren that's a little strange. I buy things for me to use, not to hand down to somebody else after I'm gone. When it comes to making music, I'm totally selfish. I'm not doing it for anybody else.

Sorry. End rant.
 

ddrumman2004

Senior Member
Well after many gigs where another member in the band spilled coke or whiskey or beer on the shells, I told myself that I was going to get a kit to gig with. So I did.

I did gig with the Master's for 8 years and then retired from playing. When I started back this year, I bought a used kit to gig with.

With the Exports, having bought them from a drummer who had gigged with them, I just set them in the back of the truck, no cases or bags, and don't worry about them. The truck bed is covered however. Each one of the Master's goes in an SKB case.

The kick drum on my Masters kit is 18x22 and heavy.....then add the weight of an SKB case to that and this 58 year old drummer gets tired quickly lugging that thing from the house to the truck to the gig to the truck....get my drift?

I did not buy them as an investment but at the same time, I want to protect my investment.
I do leave them set-up at home however and play them almost everyday.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Well after many gigs where another member in the band spilled coke or whiskey or beer on the shells, I told myself that I was going to get a kit to gig with. So I did.

I did gig with the Master's for 8 years and then retired from playing. When I started back this year, I bought a used kit to gig with.

With the Exports, having bought them from a drummer who had gigged with them, I just set them in the back of the truck, no cases or bags, and don't worry about them. The truck bed is covered however. Each one of the Master's goes in an SKB case.

The kick drum on my Masters kit is 18x22 and heavy.....then add the weight of an SKB case to that and this 58 year old drummer gets tired quickly lugging that thing from the house to the truck to the gig to the truck....get my drift?

I did not buy them as an investment but at the same time, I want to protect my investment.
I do leave them set-up at home however and play them almost everyday.
Understood. Then what you need is a couple of guys you trust to transport your Masters and set them up and strike them when you're done. You deserve it!
 

utdrummer

Senior Member
Beautiful kit and I've heard they sound as good as they look. I've never heard one in person nor played a kit but $6000 for four pieces? Unjustifiable in my book. Too many high quality kits out there for half the price that need good homes. Really, shockingly expensive.
 
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