Crash Ride position.

\o/

Senior Member
Hi, i'm fairly new to drumming and have been playing on a kit at uni. I finally have my own kit, which came without cymbals. I have bought a crash/ride for it. My question is, what position should i put this in? On the left of the rack toms like a ride (i'm left handed) or on the right in normal crash position? Or is it purely a matter of preference? Bear in mind that i want it to feel comfortable when i eventually add more cymbals.
 

Duracell

Senior Member
You place it somewhere it's easy to reach and where you don't run the risk of bumping into anything else. If you're not sure just try out various positions. Most drummers never seem to stop optimizing their kit layout.

If I were you though I'd try left of the rack toms or somewhere around the floor tom. Or (and this is what I do) remove the mid tom and put the ride right over the bassdrum. Most comfortable spot for me.
 

\o/

Senior Member
You place it somewhere it's easy to reach and where you don't run the risk of bumping into anything else. If you're not sure just try out various positions. Most drummers never seem to stop optimizing their kit layout.

If I were you though I'd try left of the rack toms or somewhere around the floor tom. Or (and this is what I do) remove the mid tom and put the ride right over the bassdrum. Most comfortable spot for me.
Thanks for that, i was more wondering about the usage of it - maybe i didn't make that clear! What i mean is because it's a ride/crash and not just a normal ride or crash on its own, would its main purpose be as a crash, therefore i'd put it in the standard crash position??

Thanks again for your response.
 

Drumolator

Platinum Member
If you are actually going to use it as a ride, you need to put it in a ride position. I am left handed but like playing the bass drum with my right foot. So I play what is called open handed. My ride is just a bit above the hi-hats, where I can easily reach it with my left hand. If you get a different ride in the future, you can always change the setup. It is TOTALLY a matter of preference. All drum sets are set up differently. Peace and goodwill.
 

Duracell

Senior Member
Thanks for that, i was more wondering about the usage of it - maybe i didn't make that clear! What i mean is because it's a ride/crash and not just a normal ride or crash on its own, would its main purpose be as a crash, therefore i'd put it in the standard crash position??

Thanks again for your response.
When I first started drumming I had only a crash that I'd ride when needed (and when I say ride I don't mean smack the sh*t out of it I mean play it like you would a regular ride cymbal). It was situated next to my hi-hat. I had no problem with it in that position. When I finally got a ride cymbal I placed it to my right and even though I had to get used to it in that new position I had no problems adapting. So don't worry too much about placement. Like I said place it where it feels comfortable and you can reach it easily without straining then it doesn't really matter right or left. It's all part of the beauty of a drum kit. You can modify it to your wishes.

But again if you ask me, I like how having the ride to the right just opens up my playing. It's tricky (though not impossible) to hit your toms with your arms crossed for instance it also means that I don't have to raise my right arm when hitting the snare when riding. And yes you'll be using " the ride " function of your crash/ride more often then the crash part. Like I said though. There are no rules. Just have fun (oh and save up for an extra crash :p)
 
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Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
What i mean is because it's a ride/crash and not just a normal ride or crash on its own, would its main purpose be as a crash, therefore i'd put it in the standard crash position??
But it IS a crash....AND a ride. Place it where you'll be able to get the benefits of both.

Forget what's written on the thing. Back in the day, cymbals were never denoted as "ride" or "crash"....they were just cymbals. Guys used them however they thought they sounded best.....in many, many cases, they used them as both.
 

zfzgg

Senior Member
I generally treat all of my cymbals as 'crash rides', and if I'm only using one cymbal I put it where your ride would normally go. Make sure you set it up so that it can actually be crashed, as some people have their rides very flat and low.
 

\o/

Senior Member
Cool, thanks for the advice everyone. Drummers are so much more friendly than guitarists (i'm a guitarist of 12 years). I'm a born drummer though - named after Phil Collins, am left handed like him and got my first kit aged 3 because i asked for it. Not wasting any more time persuing the greatest (and most fun to play) instrument on the planet!

One last question - i have a rock set up - 22" bass, 14" snare etc...the hats i bought are 13" Paiste's. Do you think i will eventually need to get a bigger size, maybe "14's or "15's to compliment the kit? I will be playing stuff from Genesis, Phil Collins, Stone Roses, Coheed and Cambria maybe up to more extreme music that i love such as Decapitated or Cannibal Corpse. Any suggestions in regard to this would be helpful. Cheers!
 

Travis22

Senior Member
Cool, thanks for the advice everyone. Drummers are so much more friendly than guitarists (i'm a guitarist of 12 years). I'm a born drummer though - named after Phil Collins, am left handed like him and got my first kit aged 3 because i asked for it. Not wasting any more time persuing the greatest (and most fun to play) instrument on the planet!

One last question - i have a rock set up - 22" bass, 14" snare etc...the hats i bought are 13" Paiste's. Do you think i will eventually need to get a bigger size, maybe "14's or "15's to compliment the kit? I will be playing stuff from Genesis, Phil Collins, Stone Roses, Coheed and Cambria maybe up to more extreme music that i love such as Decapitated or Cannibal Corpse. Any suggestions in regard to this would be helpful. Cheers!
To me, cymbal sizes and sound are just like your setup, you decide what works and sounds best for what you are wanting to do. Many drummers I know use 13in hats (including me on my church setup), but I perfer 14's. Since you are kinda new to the whole buying drums and cymbals, I'd suggest going into a few drum shops and playing on some different sizes, brands, and thicknesses. Not only is if fun to try out new stuff, but it will also help you narrow down the almost endless options.

Another good place you can start is online. Research some of your favorite drummers and see what they use.

Goodluck.
 
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