COVID 19 Nurses Perspective PLEASE READ

johnwesley

Silver Member
This is real. Please read and please share. Transparency is needed.
A real story from a real nurse in a real community hospital...

“Today started off a busy day on a usually busy step down unit in an average sized hospital. Pulling in to start my work day I glance at the “triage tents” set up adjacent to our Emergency Department where many of my colleagues and friends spend the day evaluating patients with complaints of symptoms in line with COVID-19. It feels strange but strangely comforting to know my hospital is taking these measures to protect its staff and it’s patients.

I see my patients, I treat them, I care for them with kindness and compassion as I always do. I am alert to the crisis at hand but I am resolved and professional. I smile and I am diligent with my hand hygiene. I answer a borage of questions honestly. It’s a busy shift but that is not abnormal.

Around midday I receive a phone call from a local primary care doctor in regards to a patient in my care. “Now that’s unusual,” I thought as I answered the call. This doctor sounded nervous as he informed me that the patient I had been caring for all day has been exposed to COVID-19. The patient’s daughter has just tested positive after visiting her parents over the weekend while “very ill.” The patient’s spouse has now developed a cough. My first thought was that this patient has every comorbidity that would make COVID-19 a death sentence...diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, mobility issues, obesity...My second thought was the exposure I’ve potentially faced as part of the at-risk community being a lifelong asthmatic. I immediately notified all necessary individuals beginning with the Hospital Supervisor. I stated I would like to initiate contact and droplet precautions. (This means a basic glove, gown, and mask outfit.)

I was told no and to hold off and asked who I’ve told so far. In fact, the first thing I was asked was “Who have you told so far?” Our infectious disease department was consulted and their advice was simply to “monitor the patient for symptoms.” No testing. No isolation precautions. Certainly no mask...Despite known exposure, vague symptomology, and high risk. Basically, we were instructed to wait until it is too late to act, and do so unprotected.

If this patient develops symptoms, everyone involved in their care and stay here at the hospital will have been exposed. Many of us care for our aging parents or are expecting babies or have our own health risks. We are not being informed and we are not being protected...yet we are here...caring for the sick at all cost. This situation should never have happened in the first place.

This person’s daughter chose to visit her parents while sick. She could not be bothered to heed CDC recommendations, she could not be bothered to care enough that her parents are in the high risk group. She could not be bothered to shelter in place.

I am a young, healthy, fit, albeit asthmatic adult. I know that most cases of this virus are mild, but I also know that I am not invincible. I have taken all recommended precautions outside of the hospital to protect myself and my family and my very young baby. These are precautions I live by anyways...avoiding contact with sick people, self isolating when I am sick, hand hygiene. I did not panic shop at Costco. I’ve been adhering to California’s Shelter in Place mandate with the exceptions of essentials...like food...and that’s it. I’m doing everything I can on a personal level so that I can continue to do what I must do on a professional level. I never dreamed my hospital would intentionally put me and my staff at risk. I have trusted them with my own life.

When I took the oath and became a nurse I knew the risks involved. I knew there may come a time that I would be asked to run into the fire and not away from it. I never imagined I would be put in a position to run into the fire without the necessary equipment to protect myself. I knew, inherently, that there may come an event or a situation where I would see the hard choices being made on who lives and who dies. Those days do not feel far off, and now I have much less trust in those I work for.

When shift change came, I felt sick knowing my colleagues and friends were going to be facing the same potential exposure that I had. These people are more than friends, they’re like family. I think of my friend who is a dynamite nurse, newly pregnant and asthmatic like me. I think of my friend who is nearing retirement and a hugely valuable resource to all of us with her 30+ years of experience. I think of my friend who has a spouse on chemotherapy fighting for their own life who’s kindness and care of patients is inspiring to all of us. I think of my CNA who works her ass off, never complains, always smiles, is a grandmother, and has a compromised immune system. I think of my patients, all of the patient’s, a few dozen people here trusting to be cared for and kept safe while they recover from strokes, heart attacks, sepsis, or open heart surgery. Vulnerable people that I have promised to do no harm to.

One person’s careless action potentially compromised my ability to do that. My hospitals response (which is being corrected as the patient is now isolated and awaiting test results.) compromised my ability to do that. One person, one young person, unconcerned and not at risk jeopardized the lives and health of dozens including her own parents. This is why self isolation, social distancing, shelter in place, and home quarantine is so important. Officials aren’t making these recommendations for fun. They aren’t unaware of the inconvenience but they are answering to experts in epidemiology and disease control.

One person could not care enough for her own parents to self isolate, so you think she cares about anyone else? Do you? Do you have parents or grandparents or pregnant wives or an asthmatic sister or a family member with an organ transplant or autoimmune disease or a friend battling cancer? Do NOT profess to care about any of them if you do not abide the regulations being put in place.

Keep in mind, you can still be contagious before and after you “feel” sick. Assume you have it and assume everyone else has it and protect yourself and your loved ones. Do not act selfishly and make this worse. Think of others, think of healthcare workers who don’t have the option to stay home.

Thankfully the doctor and Hospital Supervisor (neither of whom had previously been informed of the situation) who took over the next shift took the situation seriously and rectified it as best they could by contacting the county and determining how to proceed...which was testing and isolation.

I will show up for another shift tomorrow and the day after that because I vowed to do so. I am already anxious and concerned for what I see going on. I knowingly take on these risks because I care. Do not act selfishly and jeopardize my life any more than I have chosen to do myself. It’s not fair.

Stay home. Paint your house. Read a damn book. Plant a garden. STAY HOME. Let this pass and give the ones who still have to work a chance. STAY HOME
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
An excellent and timely post, John. My wife is a Mayo Clinic administrator dealing with similar difficulties. Thanks for your support.
 
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drumnut87

Well-known member
you always get the know-alls, those whose stupidity outweigh common sense, and those who plain hate being told what to do by anyone.

as i've been screaming on social media a lot lately...............FOR F***S SAKE STAY THE F*** AT HOME YOU UTTER DUMBA**ES!!!!!
 

drumnut87

Well-known member
and i have mad respect and all the time in the world for those on the frontline fighting the virus and caring for the sick and ill. mad love to them all!!!
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
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That could easily have been written by two of my sisters who are both nurses . I have heard similar from a few former colleagues on the police force .
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I commend you for the service you are providing to many. What I find especially disturbing is the response from your supervisors when you told them what you knew. That is the kind of attitude that jeopardizes the health and lives of many. In essence that kind of attitude negates the good work being done. Fortunately those who headed the next shift did the right thing. However the supervisor who headed your shift should not be allowed to operate with the lack of transparency they showed. I sure wouldn’t want to be a patient in that hospital knowing that supervisor could be charged with deciding my course of treatment or worse. I wonder if more should be done?
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
My daughter is the one who wrote the post. I pray for her and her unborn child constantly and for all who put their lives in jeopardy to save others. Like my daughter says.....STAY HOME.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
My daughter is the one who wrote the post. I pray for her and her unborn child constantly and for all who put their lives in jeopardy to save others. Like my daughter says.....STAY HOME.
If your daughter doesn't already have one, I might recommend that she obtain a keychain recorder if she lives in a one-party-consent state. Something like this. I picked one up in early 2015 and it has saved my ass a number of times, typically after someone asks me to do something so stupid that it borders on illegality.
 

specgrade

Senior Member
Man, it sure does suck living in a world where people have to be told what to do and can't think for themselves. 🙄 You Do You...
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
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Well, here I am in full isolation managing a COVID-19 patient in the ICU where I work. We do 12 hour shifts wearing all that gear!

It's actually not too bad. We get frequent breaks and we look after each other well. Being a nurse in all honesty is the greatest privilege during these times of a crisis.
 
View attachment 91037

Well, here I am in full isolation managing a COVID-19 patient in the ICU where I work. We do 12 hour shifts wearing all that gear!

It's actually not too bad. We get frequent breaks and we look after each other well. Being a nurse in all honesty is the greatest privilege during these times of a crisis.
Stay safe and be well Ben. Thank you for the work you do . Two of my sisters ( nurses) going through this as well . Everyone is short on PPE equipment with many nurses reusing one time use equipment. Former colleagues of mine on police force not getting proper equipment or none at all . Scary times . NY state has 50% of all cases in the US. But that could be due to more testing being done . In jobs like yours, my former( police ) , fire dept, ems, and military and any other first responders or people working on the front lines of an emergency or crisis, we ask for 2 things ........ THE BEST and PROPER equipment to do the job , and that common sense and proper protocols be the rule, .... not the exception . If we have these things most , or many of us will do what we have to , regardless of the possible risk to ourselves . Lord knows it isn’t for the pay or to get rich . We do it because it’s in us to do so , and the satisfaction and rewarding feeling of helping and serving others , and we do it proudly and without reservation. But more and more people will think twice before doing these jobs if those two basic things are not provided ( as johns Post and others personal accounts I’ve heard) in these kinds of callings/professions . Again good luck and health to everyone( all of us) dealing with this in one way or another , and without question those on the front lines fighting it 🙏🏻
 
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Benthedrummer

Junior Member
Stay safe and be well Ben. Thank you for the work you do . Two of my sisters ( nurses) going through this as well . Everyone is short on PPE equipment with many nurses reusing one time use equipment. Former colleagues of mine on police force not getting proper equipment or none at all . Scary times . NY state has 50% of all cases in the US. But that could be due to more testing being done . In jobs like yours, my former( police ) , fire dept, ems, and military and any other first responders or people working on the front lines of an emergency or crisis, we ask for 2 things ........ THE BEST and PROPER equipment to do the job , and that common sense and proper protocols be the rule, .... not the exception . If we have these things most , or many of us will do what we have to , regardless of the possible risk to ourselves . Lord knows it isn’t for the pay or to get rich . We do it because it’s in us to do so , and the satisfaction and rewarding feeling of helping and serving others , and we do it proudly and without reservation. But more and more people will think twice before doing these jobs if those two basic things are not provided in these kinds of callings/professions . Again good luck and health to everyone( all of us) dealing with this in one way or another , and without question those on the front lines fighting it 🙏🏻
I will NEVER forget this post.

Mate, from the bottom of my heart........ thank you, with all sincerity.

I think this forum is what is keeping me sane at the current time.

I will see you on the other side.
 
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wildbill

Platinum Member
....Well, here I am in full isolation managing a COVID-19 patient in the ICU where I work. We do 12 hour shifts wearing all that gear!

It's actually not too bad. We get frequent breaks and we look after each other well. Being a nurse in all honesty is the greatest privilege during these times of a crisis.
You've got balls, man. I don't even like to drive past a hospital, much less go in one.

Stay safe.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I'm worrying/praying for you all on the front lines-my wife included. I tell you fellas/gals the drip of this is killing me. Give me a fire-an emergency I jump but this drip is killing me. My wife was a pediatrician for over 20 years then got into pediatric hospice (the tales she tells me breaks my heart all the time-I don't know how she does it) so these young baby to teens are at risks.. Testing is slower for patients and health care workers which I'm not going into details of the skip fest. . My wife left me at home almost a week-she's almost 8 years younger and I almost 65 at risk age. But that didn't work cause I was more worried sick than being sick. I'm in really good health for an old fart (my cardiologist told me I got the coronaries of an 18 year old LOL). Two of my kids and granddaughter live in Atlanta which I know as an international city and flight hub will inevitably take off (already cases-CDC is there so could be impacted-I went to school with girl who is a lab tech there now). I got the rational Art and then the one freaking out with his head up his ass. I started doing push ups-I could barely do a set of 10 initially now-4 sets of 30. Burning off tension-and beating my drums a lot. I've never been good at controlling my brain-it seems to have a mind of it's own sometimes if that makes any sense LOL. This place helps keep me sane. I blow off steam be crazy-do all the stupid stuff I've been doing of late-did I mention my head was way way well you know LOL. Then I feel silly because I"m not on the front lines and the only thing I can do to help is stay in-which I'm doing except working in my yard some=dang Spring is busting lose here. I hope all the pollen precipitates the spreading offending droplets-filtering the air for us. Anyways I feel better now-forget I said anything. I guess it's sitting on the side lines when I want to be in the game syndrome.
 
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dale w miller

Silver Member
you always get the know-alls, those whose stupidity outweigh common sense, and those who plain hate being told what to do by anyone.

as i've been screaming on social media a lot lately...............FOR F***S SAKE STAY THE F*** AT HOME YOU UTTER DUMBA**ES!!!!!
That is not going to happen until it is mandated by the president.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
View attachment 91037

Well, here I am in full isolation managing a COVID-19 patient in the ICU where I work. We do 12 hour shifts wearing all that gear!

It's actually not too bad. We get frequent breaks and we look after each other well. Being a nurse in all honesty is the greatest privilege during these times of a crisis.
Thanks buddy for being there and doing what most of us just talk about. You and my daughter are angels.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
Thanks buddy for being there and doing what most of us just talk about. You and my daughter are angels.
Thank you so much for the kind words Mr Wesley.

The real angels in all this are the people who actually DO take this seriously and are self isolating and are adhering to strict rules regarding social distancing.........it really does remove a lot of pressure from us. Plus it lessens admissions to hospital for other reasons. This is important too as these patients end up having to be in hospital with COVID-19 patients.

You guys on here are the best.

When all this is over........I think I'll just reward myself with a new Mapex Armory kit.

Doing my "part" to keep businesses going.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
You've got balls, man. I don't even like to drive past a hospital, much less go in one.

Stay safe.
Hey wildbill......very kind of you. My heartfelt good wishes are sent to you and your loved ones also.

Please, protect yourselves and your loved ones. Look your loved ones in the eye and tell them you love them each and every day.

Oh........and demand more drum gear from them!!!!!
 
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