Constantly changing my bass pedal setup

JT1

Silver Member
Hi everyone i have developed an addiction to constantly changing my pedal set up in hope that i will keep finding something more comfortable and its doing my head in. Just when i think i'm getting along great i go hmm i wonder what it would be like if i bring the beater back a bit or if i change the footboard angle/ beater angle. I've been playing double bass about 4 years. Is it good to experiment or should i really be picking one setting and sticking with it to allow my leg muscles to develop properly? Any advice would be great also if you do the same thing please post here. Thanks
 

Mikecore

Silver Member
I say the more you mess with it the more you are likely to learn about the hardware and how it works (not a bad thing really). If you try everything and nothing is comfortable, then it might be time to observe your playing technique.
 

JT1

Silver Member
I say the more you mess with it the more you are likely to learn about the hardware and how it works (not a bad thing really). If you try everything and nothing is comfortable, then it might be time to observe your playing technique.
Thanks for the tip man. A lot of things feel comfortable but if i can't play faster or more accurate after i've modified my pedal i tinker again it becomes a silly litlte habit maybe i should just stop lol.
 

Garvin

Pioneer Member
I seriously spent about 6 months doing this once. I think its a good thing. Also, try and check out other folks pedal setups. Its such a personal thing. Actually I found that theres a big difference between the way I play the pedal at my house and the way I play it live. I ended up getting a weight rather than re-dial the spring for live gigs.

I don't think theres anything wrong with searching for a better feel.
 

Moktie

Member
One thing that seems to be commonly overlooked is the leg geometry.
Throne height can play a big part in this. 1/4" difference can change your
whole geometry. Say at the practice space you have a heavy knapp carpet.
This causes your throne legs to sink in a little. Then on stage you find
yourself on a hard surface with a thin indoor outdoor carpet. This can be
a significant factor.

If you feel an area of muscles in your leg heat up quicker than normal,
you may need to adjust the throne a little. You don't want to have to
pick up your leg to throw it down.

The idea is to get on the ball of foot where it would typically rest on the
pedal. And adjust the height of your throne so that there is a natural
spring in your leg. This is the zone for correct range of motion.
Some additional adjustment may need to be made further on for
personal comfort. But this is the best place to start for me.
The best way to describe it: Is when your sitting in a chair and you
experiment with your heel up and try to find that spot where you
leg will involuntarily start to bounce on it's own. This is the area your
looking for.

I find that if the top of my thigh is working harder than usual, then I
need to raise my throne slightly. If the bottom of my thigh near where
it meets the seat; if that area is working harder, then I need to
lower my throne slightly.

Setting up from this stage down can give you a more proof positive
result for additional kick pedal adjustments.
 
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JT1

Silver Member
One thing that seems to be commonly overlooked is the leg geometry.
Throne height can play a big part in this. 1/4" difference can change your
whole geometry. Say at the practice space you have a heavy knapp carpet.
This causes your throne legs to sink in a little. Then on stage you find
yourself on a hard surface with a thin indoor outdoor carpet. This can be
a significant factor.

If you feel an area of muscles in your leg heat up quicker than normal,
you may need to adjust the throne a little. You don't want to have to
pick up your leg to throw it down.

The idea is to get on the ball of foot where it would typically rest on the
pedal. And adjust the height of your throne so that there is a natural
spring in your leg. This is the zone for correct range of motion.
Some additional adjustment may need to be made further on for
personal comfort. But this is the best place to start for me.
The best way to describe it: Is when your sitting in a chair and you
experiment with your heel up and try to find that spot where you
leg will involuntarily start to bounce on it's own. This is the area your
looking for.

I find that if the top of my thigh is working harder than usual, then I
need to raise my throne slightly. If the bottom of my thigh near where
it meets the seat; if that area is working harder, then I need to
lower my throne slightly.

Setting up from this stage down can give you a more proof positive
result for additional kick pedal adjustments.
I do adjust my throne height too, thanks for clarifying that about thigh muscles working harder that's great advice. I find i can play much easier live cause of the hard surface where i am playing my pedal on a soft surface at home and it just doesn't feel the same.
 

Moktie

Member
Right On JT.... I was actually considering a purchase of a throne with the
hydraulic adjustment just for the different stage surfaces.
 

JT1

Silver Member
Right On JT.... I was actually considering a purchase of a throne with the
hydraulic adjustment just for the different stage surfaces.
Yeah, awesome man i have a throne that twists to adjust height which is just as good.
 

diosdude

Silver Member
It's not a bad thing to tinker with your setup, just be careful that you don't do it so much that you forget a particular setting that you liked. Always get into a comfortable position before you put your pedal down, i think it's easier that way than trying to get comfortable to how the pedal is if it's already down.
 

techristian

Senior Member
My AXIS X2 pedals are still set at the factory settings.

You can also change the feel of the pedals without adjusting them. Try playing closer or further away from the beater and see how that changes the feel and power.

Dan
 

JT1

Silver Member
Just to let you guys know i've found a setting that i love. It took some work but i've done it. I recently discovered also that the average drummer plays his pedal with the beaters set about 4-6 inch's from the head i've been doing 7 inches. I have moved it forward to 6 and have increased the spring tension some. The difference is unreal, so much easier to do and i'm finally confident with my pedal playing ability =D. There's a tip for some people who want to play double bass fast, consistent and powerful, set your beaters far back and after a few year set them forward and watch the change!
 

Foof

Junior Member
I think it's healthy thinking to get your pedal(s) to their most optimum function.Pedal & beater angle + proper spring tension is very important.The thought is....make the pedal(& set) work for you.Rather than the other way around.I also reccommend changing the pedal springs every so often too.Good luck.
 
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