Congas, other drums

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I've wondered the same thing myself Pol. I can only assume the mount does have to be secured to the shell, which may put off anyone opposed to drilling.
Yeah, when we recorded the track I posted earlier (ignored by all) we had a mic on top for the attack and one underneath for the overtones.

My guess is that the internal mic BH's percussionist is using is mounted fairly high up because the attack is clear and the overtones are not creating mud.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
I use djembe in one of my band's songs - I don't know the slap or any of the traditional techniques, all by ear, but the drum still still produces clear high tones (edge taps), mid tones (muted tap) and lows ... this would be a dead easy introductory piece for a newb http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aErrkSpfaSM
Hello Poly

A quick one just to say that I loved your "Don'let me be misunderstood" cover, great version :)
 

last man to bat

Senior Member
Have you tried internally? This guy gets an awesome djembe sound live. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhKq9JvssB8

You can see the cable hanging out of the bottom of the drum at about 1.20.
That's interesting. When I have been miced up for live it has always been miced from the top but an internal mic is a good idea.

I have had problems micing from below as it is too bassy and the tones and slaps get lost, this might have something to do with the way the bass sound is created within the djembe. But micing internally obviously overcomes this. Thanks
 

last man to bat

Senior Member
I've seen people mic the bottom of djembes in the studio... However in live situations, it's usually played standing and unless you have special mics, it's hard to mic the bottom.
Yes, I agree, it has always been a pain losing the bass live. The same is true for the darabuka, micing from the bottom of that causes hell and all problems with the sound too, the bass from that drum is immense.
 

last man to bat

Senior Member
Yeah, when we recorded the track I posted earlier (ignored by all) we had a mic on top for the attack and one underneath for the overtones.

My guess is that the internal mic BH's percussionist is using is mounted fairly high up because the attack is clear and the overtones are not creating mud.
Hey Polly, really sorry I missed that link first time around. I second what MAD said. Good djembe sound too. I miced it the same way in the studio, one over the top and one at the bottom then blended the two. Not practical for live though.

Here is my effort at recording the djembe

http://soundcloud.com/saltdog/james-djembe
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Thanks MAD and Last Man, very kind :) Thing is, it was very hard to get rid of the mud generated by the bass tone and the bassist and, even after a fair bit of work, there's still some boominess..

Last Man, beautiful djembe sound in that clip. While the bass tone is great, it's easy to imagine it making mud pies with a bassist. It's a riddle for me ...
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Hey Polly, really sorry I missed that link first time around. I second what MAD said. Good djembe sound too. I miced it the same way in the studio, one over the top and one at the bottom then blended the two. Not practical for live though.

Here is my effort at recording the djembe

http://soundcloud.com/saltdog/james-djembe
Hi Last Man

Really enjoyed that groove man :))

I like the stereo effect, is it due to the two mics?
 

last man to bat

Senior Member
Thanks MAD and Last Man, very kind :) Thing is, it was very hard to get rid of the mud generated by the bass tone and the bassist and, even after a fair bit of work, there's still some boominess..

Last Man, beautiful djembe sound in that clip. While the bass tone is great, it's easy to imagine it making mud pies with a bassist. It's a riddle for me ...
Thanks Polly. Its a real problem mixing frequencies normally taken by a bass player. The guitarist in my band is also a bass player in another band. He often complains that his drummer plays the toms too much which means he has to play higher up the frequency range. He also complains that the drums are out of tune with the song, which makes his job even more tricky.

How many bass players think like that? I as a drummer never had!
 

last man to bat

Senior Member
Hi Last Man

Really enjoyed that groove man :))

I like the stereo effect, is it due to the two mics?
Thanks MAD. The stereo effect is due to multi tracking, I'm not sure but I think there were three djembe parts on that recording and I panned them which created that effect.

The two mics created their own problems with phase issues, one mic pushing and the other pulling, which is why for live that micing would be really tricky to get right.
 

Skulmoski

Gold Member
So what are some drawbacks to getting one conga rather than say a 2-set?
You can't do this with one conga!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRn0s6h33zg

Start with one conga, but buy a top quality one. Pro quality used congas in good shape are available. Then add another one or two once you gain competence with the different hand strokes.

I love my Drumskull congas!
http://www.drumskulldrums.com/en2/22/Shop_Drumskull.php?ProdID=1885&MainID=1885

I would like a set of Volcano congas:
http://www.volcanopercussion.com/Hawaiian_Koa_Congas.php

Good luck finding a great conga!

GJS
 

Skulmoski

Gold Member
Thanks alot Skul, that last link looks very helpful!
Err .... should have wrote "that last link looks very expensive"

These are high end, custom drums. They cost a lot of money like other top tier custom instruments.

If price is no object, then you will be happy with these.

GJS
 

earlboykins

Junior Member
right, actually I was referring to the Drum Sound Samples box, it's helpful.

Err .... should have wrote "that last link looks very expensive"

These are high end, custom drums. They cost a lot of money like other top tier custom instruments.

If price is no object, then you will be happy with these.

GJS
 
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