Confidence & opportunity

Neal Pert

Well-known member
I don't know that I have a single favorite band, but I think I could handle the drum chair for a number of my actual favorite bands. And it'd be fun, I'd think. So, yeah.
 

petrez

Senior Member
Depends, but I would have a hard time passing up playing any gigs with my favorite band(s), let alone a tour. Metallica, Testament, Exodus etc, comes to mind... Even with regards to my family life, I'd bet I would regret it for the rest of my life if I said no. Luckily enough I feel that I would do a good job in most of those bands, as I'm not into really technically difficult music. Might be too confident in that area, but I feel I can nail most of that type of music, at least in a live setting were few drummers play their recorded parts note for note anyway.
 

Sebenza

Member
Over the years of playing, I've learned a lot about how confidence in yourself will breed opportunities you would've passed up before.
It's lead me to the question: If you were given a once in a lifetime opportunity to play on a tour for your favorite band, would you jump at the chance even if you knew you probably won't be good enough?

I for one would because I feel it's better to try & fail, than live with the "what if...?" of never having tried.
Without considering real life concerns such as already posted above (fatherhood etc...), I'd definitely say yes to your hypothetical question.
The opportunity to play with people at a higher level than yourself for a prolonged period, is a surefire way to learning a lot about a lot...be it musically on a technical level , dealing with different sound landscapes on stage, tempo, dynamics or even just philosophical tidbits about life as a (touring) musician...

Playing drums is not just about cleanly executing 'insert xyz groove or fill' but also about what to play, where, when and how soft or loud...and this can come from a lot of listening, but firsthand experience is generally a better teacher.

Granted, I'm replying here from the standpoint of someone who is mostly interested and involved in improvisation based music, so I'm not sure if it all applies to more rigid compositions like , for instance , most rock&pop genres.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
No. I gave up gogging because I am an antisocial homebody that gets sick of travel real quick. I need my family and my bed more than anything. Everything else is secondary.

Confidence is not an issue. I know what I can and cannot play and dont mind admitting to either.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I'm confident on the playing side and if Toto were desperate yeah I'll be a poor man's Jeff.

I've put 34 years out of my nearly 38 into drumming so if the life changing opportunity did come along I'd grab it with both hands!
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
If you were given a once in a lifetime opportunity to play on a tour for your favorite band apprentice under your favorite photographer, would you jump at the chance even if you knew you probably won't be good enough?
Fixed your question and made it appropriate for my encounter over 30 years ago. I said "yes" so fast he didn't believe me. Two weeks later, when I showed up at his studio door 2,500 miles away from my home, he was shocked. "No one moves to Detroit from San Diego". It was the best learning experience I've ever had. I also met my future wife on the journey.

Would I do it for a band? Not then (1980s) 'cuz there were too many bad actors in the biz. But now? Now, with bands being able to control their biz? No. Where I live is too nice to leave for hotels and restaurant food, and currently I've got a good thing going on.

Ivesdale 2019-06-04 01.jpg
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
After reading Mrinsanepolacks reply he really hit it home. I'm antisocial as well and like him my family and bed are what I missed when I DID live on the road for awhile back in the day. Even when times were GOOD on the road I have zero gypsy in my soul. I'm not sure I liked my outlook actually but it was who I am..like it or not.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
After reading Mrinsanepolacks reply he really hit it home. I'm antisocial as well and like him my family and bed are what I missed when I DID live on the road for awhile back in the day. Even when times were GOOD on the road I have zero gypsy in my soul. I'm not sure I liked my outlook actually but it was who I am..like it or not.

I feel like if Neil Peart could do the anti social thing on the road, I could, cause I am the same way.

While on the road, I would be 100% into the discovery of the world thing, but 0% into the discovering of the people of the world around me. Or, I would at least want to do it on my terms. I like meeting people in small doses, in quiet situations where I can focus on just one or two at a time.

I definitely have "loner gypsy" in me
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
from a GREAT hidden gem of their catalog...honestly one of the saddest songs he wrote.
 

s1212z

Well-known member
This is a trick question, I would absolutely tour with my favorite band but never with the attitude that wasn’t good enough to handle the gig (ruining my favorite band with insecurities is sacrilegious). But this is only a thought experiment, now back to reality.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Experience breeds confidence, so I say you need experience before you put your favorite band through a risky endeaver. But do you need to tour or play with your favorite band to get confidence? I think if you have enough local work with good musicians then no.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
In the words of Neil Peart: Sadder still to watch it die than never to have known it.

100%.
Hard to listen to as I care for my dad. He's 90 & struggles with many of these examples.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I'm one of those weirdos who doesn't have a favorite band, but there's a handful of gigs I'd give a shot...I think.

My wife has already told me that if we can afford it, she wants me to go for it if I'm ever given the opportunity. I'd be leaving behind an incredible career I've worked really hard for. It would be a tough decision. If I could tour and not have to do any of the other crap that working musicians have to do these days (e.g. having an online "presence" and getting followers, getting YouTube viewers and subscribers, creating content, teaching lessons, etc.), it'd be much more tempting.
 

SVBJECT

Well-known member
Over the years of playing, I've learned a lot about how confidence in yourself will breed opportunities you would've passed up before.
It's lead me to the question: If you were given a once in a lifetime opportunity to play on a tour for your favorite band, would you jump at the chance even if you knew you probably won't be good enough?

I for one would because I feel it's better to try & fail, than live with the "what if...?" of never having tried.

This is one of my favourite bands:
And so is this:
So my answer would have to depend on how arrogantly spectacular my fail may be
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
Not pertaining to the specific question, but bearing in mind the calibre of people I've seen in my working life being promoted to, & holding onto, positions way above what their ability and CVs support then yes, I'd ignore my inner doubting Thomas and go for it.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
Plus I run the risk of shattering the illusions I have of my favorite band, and ruining them forever for me
I too would have this in the back of my head if given the call. I learned long ago to never meet your heroes (let alone work for them).

Recently, I've been sitting in for a buddy in his blues band for a series of shows (some one day after another) and it feels good to play & not have to deal with the drama of a major undertaking.
At 51, I'm just fine with how things are going.
 
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