Concert toms

csnow

Senior Member
I love em. They look cool, feel good, sound great, are easy to tune... What's not to love? You know what I DON'T like?






When I hit a floor tom and it still is ringing five minutes later. Take them bottom heads off boy, it's good fer ya
I have never liked super ringy drums, and I continually see moongel on these modern hipster drums with suspension mounts. Mic a concert tom properly from below with an Evans hydraulic head and it will sound like pure thunder to the crowd. I will always be a fan.
 

roncadillac

Member
I have never liked super ringy drums, and I continually see moongel on these modern hipster drums with suspension mounts. Mic a concert tom properly from below with an Evans hydraulic head and it will sound like pure thunder to the crowd. I will always be a fan.
Thank you, I absolutely agree. In unmic'ed situations I've also had great success with coated single ply tuned a bit low. Hydraulics are a go-to for me regardless of reso or not, I never experience the 'cardboard' sound they are associated with.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
This was before my time, but apparently it was a "thing" to take off your bottom heads and rims. I know this b/c I've seen dozens and dozens of sets for sale without the bottom rim and head. I often wondered whatever happened to all of those rims and heads. They are probably in the same place where my socks go between the washer and the dryer.
 

Tamaefx

Silver Member
Concert toms were fashionable when the fashion was also to have 3 to 5 rack toms on a kit. Today, most kits are 4 or 5 piece, having just one concert rack tom on top of the bass drums seems incongrous. The use of toms in the music has evolved too.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
This was before my time, but apparently it was a "thing" to take off your bottom heads and rims. I know this b/c I've seen dozens and dozens of sets for sale without the bottom rim and head. I often wondered whatever happened to all of those rims and heads.

Yep, I did that too. Smart drummers kept the extra pieces safe to replace later. I guess I was smart. :)

The real problem with removing the bottom hoop was that toms not in bags/cases were often set on driveways etc and the bottom edges suffered. The way to combat this and still get the concert tom sound was to cut a large hole in the reso head (within an inch of the edge) so the hoop could remain on the drum. That also preserved the look of the drum. Of course, that meant destroying an otherwise good head, and most drummers don't like doing that.
 

roncadillac

Member
Yep, I did that too. Smart drummers kept the extra pieces safe to replace later. I guess I was smart. :)

The real problem with removing the bottom hoop was that toms not in bags/cases were often set on driveways etc and the bottom edges suffered. The way to combat this and still get the concert tom sound was to cut a large hole in the reso head (within an inch of the edge) so the hoop could remain on the drum. That also preserved the look of the drum. Of course, that meant destroying an otherwise good head, and most drummers don't like doing that.

That is an option but my preferred 'treatment' is to use rubber tom trim, like used to protect marching quads, especially on drums that I have cut down specifically to be concert toms. Very sturdy protection and gives a nice finished look.

Concert toms were fashionable when the fashion was also to have 3 to 5 rack toms on a kit. Today, most kits are 4 or 5 piece, having just one concert rack tom on top of the bass drums seems incongrous. The use of toms in the music has evolved too.

Don't discount concert/single head style floor toms. I've done this many times in a 4pc set up or even a 3pc with my floor tom as my only tom.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I much prefer drums that have some ring to them. Think Lenny White's sound on Romantic Warrior. That's how I've got my kits set up for sustain.


I also don't like the look of drums without the bottom heads. Just an aesthetic thing and not particularly important, but hey.
 

BruceW

Senior Member
Yep, I did that too. Smart drummers kept the extra pieces safe to replace later. I guess I was smart. :)

The real problem with removing the bottom hoop was that toms not in bags/cases were often set on driveways etc and the bottom edges suffered. The way to combat this and still get the concert tom sound was to cut a large hole in the reso head (within an inch of the edge) so the hoop could remain on the drum. That also preserved the look of the drum. Of course, that meant destroying an otherwise good head, and most drummers don't like doing that.

That's how the toms were on my first "real" kit that I bought, second hand, in 1981. Rims still on, reso heads cut out

Still playing those drums, heh. I did eventually put reso's on them tho.
 

csnow

Senior Member
Concert toms were fashionable when the fashion was also to have 3 to 5 rack toms on a kit. Today, most kits are 4 or 5 piece, having just one concert rack tom on top of the bass drums seems incongrous. The use of toms in the music has evolved too.
My first kit was a Slingerland 4 piece kit from the mid 60s. I bought it in 1981 and it came to me with no lower rim or head. Back then, it looked very out of place and odd compared to the monster kits of that era. We weren't from money, so it had to do. The only thing worse than a 4 piece in that era were the trash can lid sounding Camber cymbals I had on that Slingerland kit :)
 
What makes you think that? Resurgence as in more new concert toms being offered for sale? I don't see that trend.
Mostly in how often I see them discussed in various forums. I've seen them mentioned a fair number of times and was curious if it's just nostalgia or if there's an actual interest in them.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Mostly in how often I see them discussed in various forums. I've seen them mentioned a fair number of times and was curious if it's just nostalgia or if there's an actual interest in them.
I don't think they make up any measurable volume of total drums sold in June 2021 modern times. Like probably well less than 1%. Maybe .0001 of new sales. Just a guess :)
 
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