Child wants a career in music

dazzlez

Senior Member
okey I disagree with a lot of people here.
Having a plan B to fall back on if Plan A doesn't succeed is clear recipe to failure.
Most successful persons have gone through these thoughts when they focus on a single plan A with a plan B that will come in after a few years if they don't succeed:

"I have nothing to live for if I don't succeed","My life is worthless, I have nothing to show after all those years I've put in", "I wanna kill myself","maybe I need to something else", "life is a misery" etc etc etc
I think this usually happens after around 5-8 year of giving it ALL nonstop and get pretty much nowhere! If you think in terms of plan A and plan B, this will the moment you give up your passion because it caused you so much misery that you rather choose a safer path in life.
That's when people suddenly apply for collage at age 27, stop their old passion in order to their suddenly new path in life.


A MUCH better way to do this, is working at one or a couple of side-skills that will help you pay the bills at the bills in the future and in the beginning of a struggling career at the same time as you work most of your time on the skill.

One example would be to learn how to do webdesign or web-develop on the side, starting as soon as possible. It could also be something more directly related to music, Sound-engineering or whatever...

Having a few skills that you constant develop and never give up through your entire life, will make it more balanced, satisfied and have more options open.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
okey I disagree with a lot of people here.
Having a plan B to fall back on if Plan A doesn't succeed is clear recipe to failure.
Most successful persons have gone through these thoughts when they focus on a single plan A with a plan B that will come in after a few years if they don't succeed:

"I have nothing to live for if I don't succeed","My life is worthless, I have nothing to show after all those years I've put in", "I wanna kill myself","maybe I need to something else", "life is a misery" etc etc etc
I think this usually happens after around 5-8 year of giving it ALL nonstop and get pretty much nowhere! If you think in terms of plan A and plan B, this will the moment you give up your passion because it caused you so much misery that you rather choose a safer path in life.
That's when people suddenly apply for collage at age 27, stop their old passion in order to their suddenly new path in life.


A MUCH better way to do this, is working at one or a couple of side-skills that will help you pay the bills at the bills in the future and in the beginning of a struggling career at the same time as you work most of your time on the skill.

One example would be to learn how to do webdesign or web-develop on the side, starting as soon as possible. It could also be something more directly related to music, Sound-engineering or whatever...

Having a few skills that you constant develop and never give up through your entire life, will make it more balanced, satisfied and have more options open.
And what about the people who decide that plan A isn't really what they want to do for one reason or another, not because they haven't made it yet? Some people can't stand the road life. What about if they do make it and their music runs its course, and there is no longer a place for them in music (think Axl Rose)? Pinning yourself down to one thing and one thing only is a recipe for failure if you look at the numbers. How many people would kill for a career in music but never get the chance to pull the trigger? How many people devote their life to making music that never sells? And how many people devote their life to music but just don't have the talent to really succeed at it?

Everyone dreams big, no one says I want to be run of the mill and be like everyone else. But we have to accept that failure is always an option, no matter what path you choose. Having a map to lead you off the path that leads you no where is always a good idea. And if your path does lead you to a successful music career, what is wrong with broadening your horizons and being knowledgeable and educated in something other than music?
 

BillRayDrums

Gold Member
okey I disagree with a lot of people here.
Having a plan B to fall back on if Plan A doesn't succeed is clear recipe to failure.
Most successful persons have gone through these thoughts when they focus on a single plan A with a plan B that will come in after a few years if they don't succeed:

"I have nothing to live for if I don't succeed","My life is worthless, I have nothing to show after all those years I've put in", "I wanna kill myself","maybe I need to something else", "life is a misery" etc etc etc
I think this usually happens after around 5-8 year of giving it ALL nonstop and get pretty much nowhere! If you think in terms of plan A and plan B, this will the moment you give up your passion because it caused you so much misery that you rather choose a safer path in life.
That's when people suddenly apply for collage at age 27, stop their old passion in order to their suddenly new path in life.


A MUCH better way to do this, is working at one or a couple of side-skills that will help you pay the bills at the bills in the future and in the beginning of a struggling career at the same time as you work most of your time on the skill.

One example would be to learn how to do webdesign or web-develop on the side, starting as soon as possible. It could also be something more directly related to music, Sound-engineering or whatever...

Having a few skills that you constant develop and never give up through your entire life, will make it more balanced, satisfied and have more options open.
You nailed me to a T. :D And it's not about "having a skill such as web design"... it's "having an open mind to absorb and learn to do many things".

I only ended up a web developer "on the side" because I love it. :D And doing what one loves is kind of a good thing, right?
 

dazzlez

Senior Member
And what about the people who decide that plan A isn't really what they want to do for one reason or another, not because they haven't made it yet? Some people can't stand the road life. What about if they do make it and their music runs its course, and there is no longer a place for them in music (think Axl Rose)? Pinning yourself down to one thing and one thing only is a recipe for failure if you look at the numbers. How many people would kill for a career in music but never get the chance to pull the trigger? How many people devote their life to making music that never sells? And how many people devote their life to music but just don't have the talent to really succeed at it?

Everyone dreams big, no one says I want to be run of the mill and be like everyone else. But we have to accept that failure is always an option, no matter what path you choose. Having a map to lead you off the path that leads you no where is always a good idea. And if your path does lead you to a successful music career, what is wrong with broadening your horizons and being knowledgeable and educated in something other than music?
Did you read my whole post?
" And if your path does lead you to a successful music career, what is wrong with broadening your horizons and being knowledgeable and educated in something other than music?"
My whole point was that you should broadening your horizons from the start not after you failed with plan A.. If you already have an idea of that you gonna study something in the future if you fail, start studying it now. You don't have to go to collage to study most things, a lot of things you don't need a degree to get a great job, only great skill you can achieve in your own phase for decades...

Even if you need to study a certain subject at university /collage there are loads of options to study at half-time giving you the option to keep doing your hobby the other half of the day and still have that as the goal of your life and never give it up regardless of what happens.

A big heads-up, any programmer without a degree with a proven skill will get paid over 3 times more than a programmer with a degree from Harvard. Skill is worth more than degrees.

Success isn't to have reached the top, it's the way you have struggled all those years to get there that is the most rewarding experience.
 

BillRayDrums

Gold Member
Did you read my whole post?
" And if your path does lead you to a successful music career, what is wrong with broadening your horizons and being knowledgeable and educated in something other than music?"
My whole point was that you should broadening your horizons from the start not after you failed with plan A.. If you already have an idea of that you gonna study something in the future if you fail, start studying it now. You don't have to go to collage to study most things, a lot of things you don't need a degree to get a great job, only great skill you can achieve in your own phase for decades...

Even if you need to study a certain subject at university /collage there are loads of options to study at half-time giving you the option to keep doing your hobby the other half of the day and still have that as the goal of your life and never give it up regardless of what happens.

A big heads-up, any programmer without a degree with a proven skill will get paid over 3 times more than a programmer with a degree from Harvard. Skill is worth more than degrees.

Success isn't to have reached the top, it's the way you have struggled all those years to get there that is the most rewarding experience.
"It's not the destination, but the journey."
 
M

Mike_In_KC

Guest
A big heads-up, any programmer without a degree with a proven skill will get paid over 3 times more than a programmer with a degree from Harvard. Skill is worth more than degrees..
Maybe - but the guy without the degree needed a break to get his first job - the Harvard grad got his break when he got into Harvard...

MM
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Did you read my whole post?
" And if your path does lead you to a successful music career, what is wrong with broadening your horizons and being knowledgeable and educated in something other than music?"
My whole point was that you should broadening your horizons from the start not after you failed with plan A.. If you already have an idea of that you gonna study something in the future if you fail, start studying it now. You don't have to go to collage to study most things, a lot of things you don't need a degree to get a great job, only great skill you can achieve in your own phase for decades...

Even if you need to study a certain subject at university /collage there are loads of options to study at half-time giving you the option to keep doing your hobby the other half of the day and still have that as the goal of your life and never give it up regardless of what happens.

A big heads-up, any programmer without a degree with a proven skill will get paid over 3 times more than a programmer with a degree from Harvard. Skill is worth more than degrees.

Success isn't to have reached the top, it's the way you have struggled all those years to get there that is the most rewarding experience.
Yes I read your whole post. I addressed the first part because the second part directly contradicts the first part, or this: "Having a plan B to fall back on if Plan A doesn't succeed is clear recipe to failure".

Having a plan B is not a recipe for failure, it shows that you are prepared for whatever comes your way, not just winging it because you are forced to, or as you put it: "A MUCH better way to do this, is working at one or a couple of side-skills that will help you pay the bills at the bills in the future and in the beginning of a struggling career at the same time as you work most of your time on the skill". Are you sure that is a MUCH better way to do it? Are you speaking from experience, or is this just your take on the whole thing? I ask this because if you do have to go to plan B, having a side hobby that you develop over time puts you in this conundrum:


...the guy without the degree needed a break to get his first job - the Harvard grad got his break when he got into Harvard...

MM
Potential employers want to see that you went to school and COMPLETED it. It shows commitment, determination, the will to succeed. Having a side hobby that you could possibly turn into employment does not. It just shows that you are into something, but not necessarily committed.
 

dazzlez

Senior Member
Maybe - but the guy without the degree needed a break to get his first job - the Harvard grad got his break when he got into Harvard...

MM
You don't need a first job if you got skills, an impressive portfolio for a designer/animator/web-developer is more than enough.
For a programmer, a portfolio of projects (open-source preferable) is enough for some jobs.
Proof of skill in other ways is also enough(hackers that hacked a high-security system have been offered security jobs with extreme pay because of their proven skill)

You don't need to work for a company either, if you got a really high skill-set already you can start your own business in any field...

Other way to make a living don't need any business at all.
Poker-playing, famous youtube-channel doing your thing, informal teaching or street-performance for example :)

There is usually a way to get paid for impressive skills, sometimes you just need to use your imagination!
 

BillRayDrums

Gold Member
Yes I read your whole post. I addressed the first part because the second part directly contradicts the first part, or this: "Having a plan B to fall back on if Plan A doesn't succeed is clear recipe to failure".

Having a plan B is not a recipe for failure, it shows that you are prepared for whatever comes your way, not just winging it because you are forced to, or as you put it: "A MUCH better way to do this, is working at one or a couple of side-skills that will help you pay the bills at the bills in the future and in the beginning of a struggling career at the same time as you work most of your time on the skill". Are you sure that is a MUCH better way to do it? Are you speaking from experience, or is this just your take on the whole thing? I ask this because if you do have to go to plan B, having a side hobby that you develop over time puts you in this conundrum:




Potential employers want to see that you went to school and COMPLETED it. It shows commitment, determination, the will to succeed. Having a side hobby that you could possibly turn into employment does not. It just shows that you are into something, but not necessarily committed.

OK, I can chime in here. I never went to school for anything that I do. I'm an autodidact and pretty much just learn what's required of me to survive.

What I've found is that schools will give you the confidence to succeed because you KNOW you learned ALL that there is to learn about a subject, or at least you receive a well-rounded understanding of it.

Now on to this concept- A guy sells shoes in a 100 mile radius and makes $100,000 a year selling them. His boss says "Wow, you do so good in the small space that you cover that I'm going to double your area, so now you will represent a 200 mile radius."

So the guy starts covering that area but only makes $100,000 a year still. It's not the area that he covers, it's his own "self worth concept" that gets him that $100k a year.

So in essence you must see yourself getting what YOU want from the endeavor. And there's so many ways to parse "success"... monetary gain is only one facet.
 
M

Mike_In_KC

Guest
You don't need a first job if you got skills, an impressive portfolio for a designer/animator/web-developer is more than enough.
For a programmer, a portfolio of projects (open-source preferable) is enough for some jobs.
Proof of skill in other ways is also enough(hackers that hacked a high-security system have been offered security jobs with extreme pay because of their proven skill)

You don't need to work for a company either, if you got a really high skill-set already you can start your own business in any field...

Other way to make a living don't need any business at all.
Poker-playing, famous youtube-channel doing your thing, informal teaching or street-performance for example :)

There is usually a way to get paid for impressive skills, sometimes you just need to use your imagination!
Pretty much agree - check out my profile :)
 
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