Changes that improved your technique

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
that completely defeats the purpose

I'm talking about on drums
I often use 2 mutes on my Tama piccolo snare to “double down” on the silencing. I have a full set of mutes for the kit. Rock on.
 

Keep it simple

New member
A while ago, some kind soul here recommended the Beat Mirror app. For those not familiar, you punch in the BPM, and 1) clicks off the tempo, and then, once you start, 2) tells you what tempo you are actually playing. This thing is a godsend for a mid-level player.
This week at practice I counted off "Million miles Away" with the 153 BPM target....somehow got it started right at 153....and never varied more than 2 BPM's through the song. And it sounded great.
That never would have happened a year ago. I would swing from 153-161 and back.
 

Good Karma

Well-known member
A while ago, some kind soul here recommended the Beat Mirror app. For those not familiar, you punch in the BPM, and 1) clicks off the tempo, and then, once you start, 2) tells you what tempo you are actually playing. This thing is a godsend for a mid-level player.
This week at practice I counted off "Million miles Away" with the 153 BPM target....somehow got it started right at 153....and never varied more than 2 BPM's through the song. And it sounded great.
That never would have happened a year ago. I would swing from 153-161 and back.
Is this a free app?
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Last weekend (frustrated) I drastically changed my spring tension on my bass pedal. It has hardly any tension on it at all now. My doubles instantly became faster and cleaner. Why did I try this a long time ago?

Spring tension can have a big affect on doubles in particular. Many heel-toe players, for example, need a specific tension for a specific pedal or the technique simply won't work.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I just assumed you were a beast at 4-mallet marimba, it’s become such a huge thing in percussion departments these days. I think it’s fun, but I don’t think it will ever be all that popular. It’s heyday was the 1920s, just like ragtime xylophone, and I think it will always be mostly just a curiosity.

nah...when I was in college ('97'-2001) I was ok...I did Caritas by Micheal Burritt for my senior recital and that was the "pinnacle" of my 4 mallet playing. I can do it well enough to model the fundamentals for my kids, but they get better than me now pretty quickly.

and I would pretty much say that 4 mallets have definitely had more of a "hey day"; a "second hey day" in the past 15 years due to drum corps and indoor drumline. The level of playing and demand in those activities - especially in the early 2000's - have changed the perception of mallet playing in general among middle and high school kids. It has pushed composition, arranging, pedagogy etc. all across the spectrum. I now teach my 7th graders 4 mallets...20 years ago, that might have started freshman year with most adn with 1 or 2 players. Now, all of my kids have to be fundamentally knowledgeable in it to be able to do concert band/marching drumline. The younger kids are seeing mallet playing now as being as cool as "drumming". The literature for young 4 mall;et playing is getting better and better all the time...it is no longer "Mary Had A Little Lamb" in double vertical quarter note chords.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
Was that a specific playlist? Or was it paid content on his site? There's tons of great stuff on his channel, obviously, but I'm not finding anything specifically titled that.
During 2020, his free vids were mostly devoted to hand development & grip. You can browse his content & see the ones you need.
I pay for content on his site as he's one of 2 teachers I worked with during the shutdown (Stephen Clark, the non-glamorous drummer) was the other.
I was amazed how much my technique improved with just working that one part. Smooth & steady became the norm. Double bass is next for this year. ;)
 
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