Changes that improved your technique

MG1127

Well-known member
The thumb/index fulcrum...is like closing a door near the hinges. Not the best way. Using the back fingers gives me way more leverage. Like closing a door by the doorknob

I value your input greatly. Respectfully, in your opinion, where did I misunderstand Tony?
If you are referring to the controversial comments made by Tony in the Zildjian Day video from the 80s ... he was talking about how he often doesn't use rebound and how gripping the sticks from the front was a "willy nilly" technique.
He was saying that he grips the sticks with his back two fingers and opens up the front.

Which is something I've always done in certain situations as well

You may have been referring to something else ... but those are the comments that came to mind and are always what people mention when they talk about Tony's technique.

It is a commonly misunderstood comment

Tony presented it as sort of a blanket statement ... he surely didn't mean it the way many take it ... of course he uses rebound ... but if you watch him play he definitely is very much a wrist player
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
Middle-finger fulcrum. I have more speed, power, and control.

Playing heel-up on both feet. Totally has improved my groove.

1. Was shown the middle-finger fulcrum when I was taking percussion lessons at the Eastman School back in the 80's. Never looked back. Changed everything for me.

2. Was 'forced' to out soft my teacher (again at ESM) on the drum set. For weeks and hours on end. It was the way I learned to completely relax and realized drums do not need to be a loud instrument.

3. Practicing many things at 40-70 bpms that would normally be played 100 bpm and faster.
 

Ghede

Well-known member
I used to play about halfway down the footboard on the kick pedal. I forced myself to play further up (maybe 3/4) this year and I notice how much more powerful, quick and consistent my single foot doubles are.
I recently saw the following video and I'm trying to do the same:
Keep you posted how it goes!
 

Philaiy9

Junior Member
For traditional grip, learning how to manipulate my thumb to open up my hand. My left hand is pretty much as powerful as my right now and everything takes a lot less effort.
 

Good Karma

Well-known member
Lowered the beater height and reduced tension in my kick pedal. I gained more power and speed.

Using Vic Grip sticks and now Active Grip sticks my hands never fatigue. They allow me to use a very loose grip.

Ergo-Rider hydraulic drum throne with backrest improved my ability to play for hours. The backrest really helps my posture and this eliminated back fatigue.

Tama Rhythm Watch makes me a deputy of Chronos, God of Time, and allows me to dispute with impunity any player who questions The Tempo.

The Boss Jam Station 5 (JS-5), along with a Crown PZM mic, changed my playing the most. Recording with it helped me eliminate really bad drumming.
The Active Grip sticks, I wanted to buy a set to try out. The only ones I could find in maple 5A were signature Stephen Creighton. At $22 a pair, I passed. I thought that was a little bit ridiculous, the hickory set $12 a pair.
 
I did Rob Brown's Year of the Hands during the 2020 Covid deal. Made a world of difference.
Was that a specific playlist? Or was it paid content on his site? There's tons of great stuff on his channel, obviously, but I'm not finding anything specifically titled that.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
practicing as quietly as possible

want to improve your (insert silly name brand technique here) ?

practice every single day as quietly as you possibly can ... pretend there is a baby sleeping in the next room.
Practice pads on top of other practice pads
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
1. Was shown the middle-finger fulcrum when I was taking percussion lessons at the Eastman School back in the 80's. Never looked back. Changed everything for me.

2. Was 'forced' to out soft my teacher (again at ESM) on the drum set. For weeks and hours on end. It was the way I learned to completely relax and realized drums do not need to be a loud instrument.

3. Practicing many things at 40-70 bpms that would normally be played 100 bpm and faster.
This is awesome
 
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Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I added country as a style of music I now play. It has been cool to learn about the history of that genre and the legacy of it's players

am still working on 2 and 4 mallet marimba playing...trying to get better in that world
 
To help me with softer dynamics, I'll practice to a metronome without headphones. If I can't hear the click, I'm playing too loud.

Being to play both loud or quiet (and everywhere in between) is a skill that is very underrated
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
To help me with softer dynamics, I'll practice to a metronome without headphones. If I can't hear the click, I'm playing too loud.

Being to play both loud or quiet (and everywhere in between) is a skill that is very underrated

that goes for ALL instruments....
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I added country as a style of music I now play. It has been cool to learn about the history of that genre and the legacy of it's players

am still working on 2 and 4 mallet marimba playing...trying to get better in that world

I just assumed you were a beast at 4-mallet marimba, it’s become such a huge thing in percussion departments these days. I think it’s fun, but I don’t think it will ever be all that popular. It’s heyday was the 1920s, just like ragtime xylophone, and I think it will always be mostly just a curiosity.
 

rocker261

Junior Member
I play heal-up, and have recently raised my heal more than I had been. I also used to place the front of my foot about midway on the pedal, now I go a little closer to the beater. Both of these helped my accuracy and speed
 
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