Chain on an angle, what affect does it have?

Ben Tama

Member
Just to clarify, chain/strap/direct drive, on an angle from a side viewpoint. This is what I'm talking about:

See how diagonally the chain is sloping?

...as opposed to vertical, like this:


Does anyone actually know what affect this has on a pedal? To keep it simple, lets assume we're using linear cams.

Reason I ask is that I've been trying to find pedals which run vertically as per second pic. I try to visualise what's happening mechanically, I might be wrong but if it runs vertically; the beater will move faster at the start and slower as it gets to the head. Diagonal sloping chains will do the opposite. But perhaps it doesn't matter?

Why do just about ALL manufacturers make pedals with chains/dd's on an angle?! Very had to find ones that run vertically (which are any good).
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
The angled cam is a bit faster but if you're already an experienced player you won't really notice. Also a lot of manufacturers make normal round cams though..

Ex= Tama Iron Cobra comes in Power Glide (Angled) and Rolling Glide (round cam). PG doesn't take a lot of force to move the beater and you can get powerful strokes with minimal effort. RG is just your average pedal.


Also, manufacturers have found out that most people are looking for a powerful and fast pedal so they don't really make round cams anymore.


I personally use the Tama IC 900 Rolling Glide because I'm not looking for a lot of power and speed while playing. I just want a pedal that lasts a long time and keeps up with my feet.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
It doesn't matter. Once you step on the footboard, the chain angle changes position due to the movement of the footboard. The chain on the top pedal will become more vertical, while the bottoms chain will angle away from the cam. There is no way around this. Since the hinge point is at the heel plate and the contact point of the chain is at the toe, the horizontal distance between the two changes as the footboard angle changes. The chain or DD link must change angles to make up for the horizontal distance. There may be some workload differences upon initial movement, but is probably negligible. Too many other factors to consider.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
You can adjust the cam or slide the footboard forward to make the chain more vertical. My Taye pedal has adjustments for that . But since the cam is circular or elliptical in nature, it won't matter much as long as the pedal shaft is near vertical when it hits the drum.
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
Just to clarify, chain/strap/direct drive, on an angle from a side viewpoint. This is what I'm talking about:

See how diagonally the chain is sloping?

...as opposed to vertical, like this:


Does anyone actually know what affect this has on a pedal? To keep it simple, lets assume we're using linear cams.

Reason I ask is that I've been trying to find pedals which run vertically as per second pic. I try to visualise what's happening mechanically, I might be wrong but if it runs vertically; the beater will move faster at the start and slower as it gets to the head. Diagonal sloping chains will do the opposite. But perhaps it doesn't matter?

Why do just about ALL manufacturers make pedals with chains/dd's on an angle?! Very had to find ones that run vertically (which are any good).
That's a SPEED COBRA, its designed with the angle to be faster, easier stroke. PEARL POWER SHIFTER option will get the same effect. All chain pedals end their stroke as you say- straight up and down.
 

axisT6

Senior Member
The more angle there is in the chain, the lighter the pedal feels. You can make up some difference with spring tension.

For me, this was a dig difference between the old single chain DW 5000 and the newer double chain 5000. Sure, the latter design had more mass due to the double chain and the slightly wider foot board, but the overall mechanical advantage was less.

In short, you may be splitting hairs on this with most pedals.
 

Ben Tama

Member
The more angle there is in the chain, the lighter the pedal feels. You can make up some difference with spring tension.

For me, this was a dig difference between the old single chain DW 5000 and the newer double chain 5000. Sure, the latter design had more mass due to the double chain and the slightly wider foot board, but the overall mechanical advantage was less.

In short, you may be splitting hairs on this with most pedals.
Thanks. Though I gotta admit I'm not sure what people mean when they say lighter feel. My main concern is accuracy, I want a fast swing at the start of the beater's flight, I'm not sure the angle helps. I have a Yamaha 9500c and the chain is on a noticeable angle, I think this makes it trickier to play especially when playing quick between rudiments (for example).
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
Thanks. Though I gotta admit I'm not sure what people mean when they say lighter feel. My main concern is accuracy, I want a fast swing at the start of the beater's flight, I'm not sure the angle helps. I have a Yamaha 9500c and the chain is on a noticeable angle, I think this makes it trickier to play especially when playing quick between rudiments (for example).
Loosen the spring to where it doesn't engage until the foot board is halfway depressed, then there's zero tension at the beginning of the stroke which gives a lighter feel, a fast swing at the start of the beater's flight.
 

Ben Tama

Member
Loosen the spring to where it doesn't engage until the foot board is halfway depressed, then there's zero tension at the beginning of the stroke which gives a lighter feel, a fast swing at the start of the beater's flight.
Cheers, I was more concerned about the mechanical implications on an engineering level. But like you say, splitting hairs. Right now I've got mine set where I'm almost comfortable with it.

I researched the DW 5000 pedal, very interesting that DW has gone more perpendicular with their chain.
 

axisT6

Senior Member
Thanks. Though I gotta admit I'm not sure what people mean when they say lighter feel. My main concern is accuracy, I want a fast swing at the start of the beater's flight, I'm not sure the angle helps. I have a Yamaha 9500c and the chain is on a noticeable angle, I think this makes it trickier to play especially when playing quick between rudiments (for example).
Consider two pedals where the only difference is chain angle. The pedal with a higher chain angle requires less effort to work the pedal. The pedal with the more vertical chain requires more effort.

Once you manipulate beater height, beater weight, and spring tension however, the differences become smaller.
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
Cheers, I was more concerned about the mechanical implications on an engineering level. But like you say, splitting hairs. Right now I've got mine set where I'm almost comfortable with it.

I researched the DW 5000 pedal, very interesting that DW has gone more perpendicular with their chain.

DW never went anywhere, their design (5000) is not their own, its the old CAMCO pedal.

TAMA was first with the eccentric toothed cam on a pedal in their version of refinements of the CAMCO pedal.






Consider two pedals where the only difference is chain angle. The pedal with a higher chain angle requires less effort to work the pedal. The pedal with the more vertical chain requires more effort.

Once you manipulate beater height, beater weight, and spring tension however, the differences become smaller.

True, you can also move your foot down on the foot board, hit just a little below center of the board, this is a manipulation of the lever principal also.
 
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