Cassette tape revival

jda

Silver Member
cassettes have the tiny little felt blocks the tape rides over..
the glue there dries and over time the felts fall off. ask me how I know No. Don't)
but I too, liked cassettes
 

GretschedHive

Silver Member
For me, at least, I prefer digital in every way...except for the ritual. Cleaning off the vinyl, placing the needle carefully, sitting down in a (beanbag) chair as perfectly placed between the speakers as possible, sitting back and just listening, or perhaps poring over and over the LP artwork for 22 minutes, and then either getting up and placing the needle back at the beginning or flipping the platter over and going on to the second side...

It helped me absorb the music more fully. And because you couldn't just skip to the next track with the push of a button, it almost (but not quite) forced you to listen to every song, and sometimes some of those songs you didn't like much at first because your favorites. (And sometimes they didn't.) There are albums that have been released in the past 20 years that I absolutely loved but which I know few of the the words to. Whereas when I was a teenager, I probably knew just about every word to at least a few dozen albums, and maybe scores.

I think occasionally about this Trent Reznor interview from 2017, wherein he talks about these issues--here's a small excerpt:

Wouldn’t a music obsessive like yourself have loved having the same choices that listeners have now?
Again, I’m not saying mine was a better era, but a lot of the music I ended up really loving was because I spent nine bucks on an album and that meant I had to listen to it and figure it out. Or maybe I forgot to sign the slip for the Columbia Record Club and they sent me a Billy Joel album I never asked for. Then you get it and you’re like, Oh fuck. But you know what? I listened to that album a thousand times simply because that was the record I’d paid for, and I ended up loving Billy Joel’s 52nd Street.

Basically you’re saying sweat equity matters.
Yeah, it does. I’m not saying there aren’t a million great things about streaming music. Being able to have access to every obscure Frank Zappa [the intensely prolific composer-satirist released 62 albums between 1966 and his death in 1993] album is good; I was never going to hear a lot of them as a teenager, because I didn’t have the money to buy all 600 albums he put out. But I don’t think I’m being a crank if I suggest that maybe there’s some drawbacks to the all-access, all-free world we’re living in.
 

Doraemon

Well-known Member
For me, at least, I prefer digital in every way...except for the ritual. Cleaning off the vinyl, placing the needle carefully, sitting down in a (beanbag) chair as perfectly placed between the speakers as possible, sitting back and just listening, or perhaps poring over and over the LP artwork for 22 minutes, and then either getting up and placing the needle back at the beginning or flipping the platter over and going on to the second side...
I have some similar sentiments, though I prefer digital for listening, for quality and convenience, I like displaying physical media on a shelf. And 99% I still listen to albums, even on a computer. I can’t stand random music, radio or playlists (have only a few purpose built lists, like “songs to learn on drums”). Streaming sites give me excellent recommendations and I discovered many songs from unknown artists that I liked much, but as soon as I find a good song, I go get the album. It’s incomplete otherwise, like a button without a shirt.
 

petrez

Senior Member
My band just released our first record on cassette (we released it in 2020 on CD, vinyl and streaming platforms), we got an offer to do a limited edition run of 50 cassettes from a local record label. They are basically just doing it for the fun of it, not for making tons of money (obviously...). Anyway, it's a cool thing, I got my copy just recently, but have no cassette player at home (not a LP player either, for that matter) so it's basically just for the sake of it being cool/nostalgic, I guess.
297381596_476216221176011_481866725425453721_n.jpg
 

s1212z

Silver Member
The Devil and Daniel Johnston was a great documentary. I didn't know he passed away in 2019. But I recall him passing out tapes and we was actually performing an individual performance and doing a custom art work for every single tape handout if I remember correctly.

How about Laser Disc next, or mini CDs...when you can't look forward, you look backwards is seems. When that drys out, what next then
 

WuHan Solo

Active Member
Actually, cassette tapes worked well in vehicles. The road noise obscured the tape hiss. Plus...they didn't "jump" when you hit a bump or pothole like the early versions of CD players.

..........and record players:


"Wait 20 years, and it will come back in style."

Or 60-70 years....... even though it didn't go into production.


I listen to digital most of the time simply for convenience. i.e. earbuds at work, doing stuff around the house, working on the car, etc...
But, I was born in '70, so I grew up on vinyl and cassette so they do hold a bit of nostalgia for me. Vinyl has held my attention all these years, and my turntable reflects that. Like GretschedHive said, the ritual is certainly factored in when it comes to listening to vinyl. I also have a working hi-end cassette player (3 actually) but I only use them these days to listen to old recordings of myself/bands and some of the rare bootleg stuff that I should transfer to digital before it's too late.

Edison Wax Cylinder gets my vote.

Those things are super fragile.
My parents used to collect antiques, so they were (and still are) all over their house as decor. When I was a kid I had some friends over when they were out of town and we found ourselves listening to the phonograph. Unfortunately, some of the cylinders broke as we slid them off the player. We were super careful too. Fortunately they don't use the thing and the statute of limitations has run out.
It's exactly like this:
1664137857377.png
My band just released our first record on cassette (we released it in 2020 on CD, vinyl and streaming platforms), we got an offer to do a limited edition run of 50 cassettes from a local record label. They are basically just doing it for the fun of it, not for making tons of money (obviously...). Anyway, it's a cool thing, I got my copy just recently, but have no cassette player at home (not a LP player either, for that matter) so it's basically just for the sake of it being cool/nostalgic, I guess.
View attachment 124661

That is super cool! All of it.
I like how the name of the album is made to look like the parental advisory sticker. Nice touch! (y)
Where do you have them for sale?
 

petrez

Senior Member

Rochelle Rochelle

Senior Member
I'm guessing cassettes are cheap to produce and most bands are releasing them for some nostalgia factor. I doubt they sell many of them. I haven't listened to a cassette in god knows how long. I don't even think I have a tape player anymore.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
I’m not buying into any of the nostalgia for records or tapes. If someone else wants it, have fun, but I’ll take boring old digital any time.

I can't afford it because I know I will go "all out", and I don't need another hobby to go "all oit" in

many, many of my friends have gone all "midlife crisis" on getting back into albums and record players - some like $30000 worth of "all out" with audiophile stuff. While I think the hardware is eally awesome, I can't justify the cost
 

end Goat

Member
My partner and I have a few albums that have come out on cassette overseas. Cassette label are very much a thing in experimental music. We have two more coming out on different labels in the coming months and I have a split harsh noise wall cassette coming out shortly as well. I also review a lot of cassette releases in my zine, which is print only.

We're talking about limited runs of physical media, I don't think it's shocking that the collector gene is expressed in persons passionate about music. Short runs of cassettes are affordable to produce and home dubbing is viable and enjoyable to the right people.

The one downside is international shipping of cassettes. That's a real bummer.
 

toddmc

Gold Member
What’s up with this trend of (some) bands releasing albums on cassette tapes again? Is it all because of Stranger Things or Guardians of the Galaxy, or something else? Have you bought any since 2000?
Interesting observation alright.

Even Megadeth (usually at the forefront of the latest tech trends) has jumped on the nostalgia bandwagon for their latest album.
Fairly off-brand for them but hey, if it's all in fun and makes them a few extra bucks...

816YKBH0JJL._SL1500_.jpg
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I didn't see that one coming.

I'll freely admit that it's mostly Spotify and headphones. There's too much going on to really care.

I did finally set up my old stereo in the shed, which is nice, but hardly necessary.

I get LPs, but don't really get this. Charm factor I guess.

A walkman will probably be a less pricey status symbol than the latest iPhone, but if you cover it in gold and diamonds, maybe not. Who knows what crazy portable multi media center they'll com up with. Back to the Future or is it Forward to the Past?
 

Macarina

Silver Member
Been there, done that. I kinda get the nostalgia aspect, but man, I really don't want to relive that technology. I looooooved my vinyl album collection, but again, I'm not looking back with heartache.
 

Juniper

Gold Member
My favorite retro format of all time.... recordable, editable, and durable.... Minidisc !
View attachment 124688
I still have my minidisc player somewhere.

Absolutely loved that format too. Carried so many discs in my backpack when I was out and about.

I do like digital though. Having millions of songs at my fingertips is a real treat. I can walk our dogs and listen to music using headphones, or earphones then instantly and seamlessly transfer the music to one of our home speakers as soon as I arrive home.

That never looses its cool for me
 
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