Carrying stands, pedals and other PITAs

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Any tips on how to get all that awkward metalwork from A to B? Is there a way to keep it all together and reduce walks to and from the vehicle?
And a system for keeping everything together to avoid forgetting minor components - like bass pedals?!!
How about rolling the stands up in the drum rug and strapping it tight?
And Yamaha tom mounts - what do you DO with those things? Lumps, shafts and spikes projecting in all directions - almost needs a dedicated flat bed truck of its own. Chinook helicopter suspension airlift perhaps?
Ps. AND - how do you make sure there's always a drum key around when you need one? (My keyring is fat enough already thanks. I get girls following me home if I put it in my front pocket.)
 
Not sure if I got you wrong, but why not use a regular hardware bag/trolley? That's what most of us do I guess. Some use towels or rags to protect the parts from direct contact, others don't care too much about scratches and put it in next to each other. That's at least what I do, because I am not too keen to extend set up time more than necessary.

Drum keys are cheap, so I own quite a lot to put one everywhere. One or two live in my stick bag, one in my spare case, one sits right on my practice kit, so I don't have to worry about it.
 

RickP

Gold Member
I prefer to use a rolling hardware bag - preferably a BEATO bag as it has excellent skateboard style wheels and an extended strap handle which make towing behind you easier .
The Ahead Ogio sled hardware bag is excellent as well . I have a Protection Racket rolling hardware bag but I prefer the Beato bag . The Beato is more impervious to weather and as previously stated has far better wheels than the Ahead or Protection Racket hardware bags .

The best thing I ever did was down sized my cymbal and hihat stands to lighter weight stands .
my cymbals sound better when mounts on lightweight stands and my back loves them . I really like the Tama Classic series stands and the Yamaha Crosstown stands as they really reduce the weight of your hardware bag .
I don’t carry my bass drum pedal in with my hardware generally . I have the Sonor Perfect Balance pedal folding model and it has a nice padded bag that it goes into .

I would also highly recommend picking up a Rockn Roller cart . Mine is over 15 years old and still works like the day I bought it . My band mates bought them after seeing mine .

Drum keys, moon gel and ancillary items go into a stick bag . I also have a small cloth bag with a shoulder strap that I keep mic cables , shakers , tambourine and other goodies in .
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Hardware is certainly the biggest pain to transport. I play a four-piece kit with no tom mounts (a snare stand instead), so my hardware burdens aren't too laborious. My two snare stands (one for my snare, the other for my tom) enter a given venue with my drums. My hi-hat and cymbal stands go in last, along with my cymbals. At the end of a show, I break down my cymbals and related stands and pack them away first, dealing with my drums last. That's always been my organizational mindset.

My drum keys are in my stick bag, along with other accessories.
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
I have a 48" long hardware bag with wheels on it. All I have to do is fold in the bases of the stands and toss them in there. Makes for easy setup not having to adjust the freakin' tubes every time. The bases have a little dot sticker on them so I know how far to open them up. I'm able to slide the case across the back seat of my car.
 

Jasta 11

Well-known member
Try to reduce the amount of stands if you can. I have a pearl bass drum mount and one tube if for the rack tom, the other has a small boom arm i use for the ride. Both stay in the bass drum all the time and act as a handle when carrying the bass drum. ( i swivel the cymbal arm in so its along side of the tom mount.) i have keys in my pedal bag and stick bag but since i got a DW5000 pedal, i use the little clip that hold a key on the pedal plate. its always there so i dont take the other keys out anymore. The only stands i carry in are my hi-hat and snare. If i need a crash cymbal i keep a stand in my car. I use a speaker stand bag so i dont have to shorten my hi-hat or cymbal stand when i use it.
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
I'm new to this - I've shifted my kit one time (on purchase) And played it zero times (due to lockdown)
I'm actually surprised to hear that there's a single container capable of a. holding and b. lifting all this misshapen, heavy ironwork!
(I have bought drum bags tho.)
Things that are a real pain in the ass. Or a type of yummy pocket bread. Take your pick.
😂
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Hardware is certainly the biggest pain to transport. I play a four-piece kit with no tom mounts (a snare stand instead), so my hardware burdens aren't too laborious. My two snare stands (one for my snare, the other for my tom) enter a given venue with my drums. My hi-hat and cymbal stands go in last, along with my cymbals. At the end of a show, I break down my cymbals and related stands and pack them away first, dealing with my drums last. That's always been my organizational mindset.

My drum keys are in my stick bag, along with other accessories.
Is there a theft awareness aspect to not leaving the cymbals laying about unattended?
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I have a 48" long hardware bag with wheels on it. All I have to do is fold in the bases of the stands and toss them in there. Makes for easy setup not having to adjust the freakin' tubes every time. The bases have a little dot sticker on them so I know how far to open them up. I'm able to slide the case across the back seat of my car.
I keep my hardware tubes in place as well, never breaking them down. Doing so would add a lot more work to gigging.
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Great responses to my question, thankyou folks!👍
The idea of one big roller-bag strongly appeals because having everything together it makes it harder to leave a vital item behind: if I can - I will. 😕
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Is there a theft awareness aspect to not leaving the cymbals laying about unattended?
Not so much theft awareness as staggering-drunk awareness. Particularly in venues without stages, audiences can be dangerously close to equipment. As cymbals are somewhat fragile, they're the last items I introduce to a facility and the first items I remove. When "Jack the Village Inebriate" decides to roam about with a spirit of gregarious abandon, I don't want my cymbals in his precarious path, regardless of whether they're still on stands or on the ground in their case. A quick cymbal exit has always been my precautionary convention.
 

Jasta 11

Well-known member
I keep my hardware tubes in place as well, never breaking them down. Doing so would add a lot more work to gigging.
I dont think a single Drum Hardware bag was ever designed by a gigging drummer. All of them are designed too short. You always have to take the hi-hat apart which is not a time saver. I used to use, before i got the speaker stand bag, a Golf travel bag by Oggio. Long enough to hold drum stands and it has a pull handle on one end and inline skate wheels on the other. Perfect design by a non drummer, even old school canister thrones ( no handles, too short for hi-hat.
 

roncadillac

Member
It's easy for me because I use really small kits and minimal cymbals. Still, carrying stands sucks haha. My Tama round rider XL is super heavy.

I'm usually playing 2 or 3pc kits but currently the band I'm playing with specifically calls for heavy tom work so I'm using a 4pc with hats and ride I break it down like this (my kit has some dedicated bags which helps a ton):

Bass drum in bass drum bag.
Floor tom, rack tom, and snare in one bag with dividers.
Cymbals in one bag.
Hi hat stand, cymbal stand, snare stand, stick bag, pedal, tom arm, floor tom legs go in one bag.
Seat is by itself.

I use a mic stand bag for my hardware. Granted, I've got only a few stands all single braced, but it's held up to gigging abuse for about 5 years now and cost me $20. I use a Tama hp10 pedal which folds pretty flat, I just zip that up in a separate stick bag so it's protected and still flat. I'm about to install a vintage style bass drum cymbal holder which cuts down 1 extra stand. Don't discredit those cheap mic bags for 2-3 heavy stands. I've seen guys use big camping duffle bags as well.
 
Last edited:

Morrisman

Platinum Member
I dont think a single Drum Hardware bag was ever designed by a gigging drummer. All of them are designed too short. /QUOTE]

Some brands of drum hardware bags are available in a range of sizes from 30” up to 48” long. You can definitely leave your hihat in one piece.
The real factor for me is large wheels that can roll over gravel, grass and brick paving. With a cymbal backpack, my drums stacked on a hand cart in front and my hardware trolley behind me, I can get into most gigs in one trip.
 

sumdrumguy

Senior Member
Some of this has been mentioned, but here I go.

I have multiple sets of hardware, and always a keep a set packed in a hardware bag just for gigs. Hi-hat, kick pedal, throne, 2x cymbal stands, tom mount, snare stand. Even though it stays packed, I check it before every gig. Add/remove gear if necessary.

I lighten the load by using lighter hardware. In my case, either Yamaha 700 series, single braced hardware, or Yamaha Crosstown Hardware. With the 700 series, I use a Protection Racket Rolling Hardware Bag. Amazed at how much I can fit in that case.

When they aren't being played, cymbals stay in a padded cymbal bag. They are the last thing to setup, and the first thing I tear down.

For a rug, I have a 5' x 7' that rolls up nice and tight. Velcro keeps it that way in transit. Usually slide that in the car after everything else is in. When I get to the venue, I take my cymbal bag and rug in with me. Check in with manager/staff, then bring in the rest. Usually 3 trips in total.

Extra drum keys, cymbal felts, cymbal sleeves, a small tool set, LED penlight, and other assorted bits are in a small soft case in my hardware bag.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I dont think a single Drum Hardware bag was ever designed by a gigging drummer. All of them are designed too short. You always have to take the hi-hat apart which is not a time saver. I used to use, before i got the speaker stand bag, a Golf travel bag by Oggio. Long enough to hold drum stands and it has a pull handle on one end and inline skate wheels on the other. Perfect design by a non drummer, even old school canister thrones ( no handles, too short for hi-hat.
That's a great idea, Jasta 11. I might follow your lead at some point.
 

Jasta 11

Well-known member
Some brands of drum hardware bags are available in a range of sizes from 30” up to 48” long. You can definitely leave your hihat in one piece.
only with their larger bags, 30 wont hold a hi-hat so whats the point, who thought that drummers wanted to take apart a hi-hat 3-4 times a week. No drummer ever!
 
Top