Can You Add More Lugs To Your Bass Drum

HUdrummer

Senior Member
Is it possible to ad more lugs to my 6 lug BD. Im considering restoring my poplar kit by staining it, new heads on, and alot of other stuff to get me by until i can raise enough money for a new kit. The problem im running into is giving the bass more lugs. I know I could just screw in more new lugs i could buy at http://www.drumfactorydirect.com between the old lugs to make it a 12 lug kit, but the problem with that is the holes I have from the tom mount thing being in the way. Im wondering if it would work if before I stain the kit I use some wood fill putty over those holes. then sand it down and stuff. then when im done staining the i screw in the new lugs. I know It might not look amazing in the spot with the wood fill putty but owell. will this work?
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Is it possible to ad more lugs to my 6 lug BD. Im considering restoring my poplar kit by staining it, new heads on, and alot of other stuff to get me by until i can raise enough money for a new kit. The problem im running into is giving the bass more lugs. I know I could just screw in more new lugs i could buy at http://www.drumfactorydirect.com between the old lugs to make it a 12 lug kit, but the problem with that is the holes I have from the tom mount thing being in the way. Im wondering if it would work if before I stain the kit I use some wood fill putty over those holes. then sand it down and stuff. then when im done staining the i screw in the new lugs. I know It might not look amazing in the spot with the wood fill putty but owell. will this work?
I'd just make it 8-lugs per head. You would have to re-drill everything, but it'll look much better. The last time I did this, I bought a wooden dowel about the size of the holes left over from the old lug holes, and filled the hole with that and wood glue. Then I sanded it down after it dried (by hand) and re-finished the shell. There is some mathematical formula I think to set where the new holes would go (I had someone else do the figuring and drilling), then added the new lugs and put the drum back together.
 

HUdrummer

Senior Member
Better and cheaper.I should have thought of that. so should i use wood fill putty or would that look shitty?
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
Is it worth that much work? Just learn to tune really well and save for the kit you want. Unless you just like to tinker for the sake of tinkering I don't think there will be much of a difference.
 

HUdrummer

Senior Member
Yea I guess I agree that was aa stupid idea now that I think about it, I still do like the idea of using wood fill putty to filll in the holes in my bass.
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
Don't let me stop you. Maybe you can try it out after you get your next kit. This way you could gain some knowledge on modifying drums without having to worry about what to play if you make a mistake.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
I said a dowel and wood glue.
I understand you're motivated by kindness,and I applaud your efforts.

"Use wood dowel and glue"
"should I use wood putty"
"I said dowel and wood glue"
"It was a stupid idea now that I think about it, I still do like the idea of using wood fill putty"

I don't even know why I clicked on this thread.I guess its kind of like you really don't want to look at a car accident....but you look anyway.I just want to see what he'll think of next.Peace Bo.

Steve B
 

drummerfish

Senior Member
its already a 6 lug which makes it a beginner kick to begin with. more lugs will not make it sound better.

i used to work for a indie drum co., and basically my feeling in why spend all the money on t's,claws and lugs when it can be spend on a the new kit,or even a better quality used kick. it will add up quick.

its like people who want to re-wrap a tama rockstar or pearl forum kit. the cost and labor in the wrap is worth more than the drums. not a good idea.there's lots of deals on drums on craigslist these days. i'm sure you can find something better.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I'd just make it 8-lugs per head. You would have to re-drill everything, but it'll look much better. The last time I did this, I bought a wooden dowel about the size of the holes left over from the old lug holes, and filled the hole with that and wood glue. Then I sanded it down after it dried (by hand) and re-finished the shell. There is some mathematical formula I think to set where the new holes would go (I had someone else do the figuring and drilling), then added the new lugs and put the drum back together.
8 lugs would be every 45 degrees
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
8 lugs would be every 45 degrees
360 divided by 8 is the magic formula.
Just like the degrees on an 8 cyl car engine. Each piston reaches top dead center in its stroke every 45 degrees in the crankshaft revolution.

Its probably easier and cheaper to just buy a used 8 lug bass drum and finish it to match.
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
Wood dowel and glue is the method used by professional restorers. I would do it that way.

I have many plans for restoration projects this summer.
 
Top