Can we start a list of well-known studio recordings that have sloppy drumming in them?

ohiodrummer1964

Senior Member
Of course this can't be a mistake, but every time I listen to Steely Dan's Aja (the song) it sounds like Steve Gadd hits a rim or stick at 4:57. If he doesn't, does anyone here know what that "click" sound is?

Dutch
I hear that every time I listen to that song. I always thought it sounded like he hit his sticks together and that it was intentional. The volume and strength of the attack don't sound like an accidental glance. Plus the timing is just right to sound like he's place-keeping. I don't actually know that, though, maybe it was a mistake that sounded so cool they liked it and left it in.
 
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poika

Silver Member
Didn't have a prob with 2:48 but 2:41 was off. It sounded like he was having trouble with the feel generally.
Yeah, if you listen to the whole track the whole thing is off, basically. Either he is struggling with the slower tempo, or then he just does a great job at channeling the anxiety and awkwardness of the lyrics to the drum track :)

I really don't think he is the most technically advanced drummer by any means, compared to some one like Matt Cameron for example, but at the end of the day he gets the job done and his drumming in general suits the aggressive feel of the band and that's all that matters.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Is it off-beat? I thought it was meant to be that way because as a cover band player, it's interesting because it seems like this nice turn-around, no?
Well I flubbed my words, I meant to say the cowbell starts the song but snare comes in off beat. Then even Keef comes in off beat on the 1st chord (or way behind beat, like he likes to do).
It is indeed a nice effect, I love listening to it, but every cover band I've been in we cannot emulate that little trick/mistake to start the tune.
 

inneedofgrace

Platinum Member
Here's a related question: How many drummers are brought in to play their parts in the studio (however many takes), but then are never part of the production process of the recording? Those drummers would never know if the mistake or sloppy playing was fixed until the record was published, and by then it is too late. They could think they fixed a flubbed part during a retake, but they have no control over whether the retake was used or not.

I also always wondered how many takes by Bonzo it took to get the recording of Moby Dick finalized. The only song I know that was recorded in one take was Twist and Shout by the Beatles. They attempted a second take, but Lennon's voice was shredded by then. Most recordings by the Beatles were comprehensive with dozens of takes, with lots of downmixing because they were only using 4-tracks until the studio upgraded to 8-track recording machines late in the game. Sometimes they came into the studio weeks later to change out parts and produce a new mix. While the first recordings early in their career were usually simpler, the later recordings were quite complex. Then when Mr. Wall of Sound came into the picture.....
 
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opentune

Platinum Member
I also always wondered how many takes by Bonzo it took to get the recording of Moby Dick finalized. .
Actually a good example. In the Led Zep FAQ book (I think) it is revealed the version (on the Led Zep II) was stitched together from the same solo in different sessions, while they were touring through the US. A studio here, one there etc. I may be where but I think the 'stitch' can be picked out at about 1:00 and a little after 3:40 (better heard on anything than a you tube).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lw61c8NSejA

no matter, of course we all know he can play it great and straight through live....for 20 minutes or so!
 
I wonder why everyone keeps pointing out rim clicks as errors. Playing the rim is quite valid. I do it all the time in my jazz/swing band. If you involve the rim you vastly expand your sonic palette.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
How about we start a list of songs that are "perfect", and as such, came out lacking life, real energy, or feeling?

For me, the goal of recording is never, ever to make a "perfect" take that has no mistakes. I'll take a mistake or two for sure if that's the track that makes my arm hair stand up and melts me into a puddle of groove.

"They constantly embrace music only to stifle it. They dissect it, unaware of their preliminary murder of it, and without understanding that the work they have pulled to pieces lacks only one thing, but the most important: life." - G. Jean-Aubry
BTW classy comment, Wats. A perfect putting of perfectionism in its place.


Yeah, if you listen to the whole track the whole thing is off, basically. Either he is struggling with the slower tempo, or then he just does a great job at channeling the anxiety and awkwardness of the lyrics to the drum track :)
Hahaha - or maybe the singer is a genius and deliberately chose a groove that he knew would make the drummer uncomfortable :)


Buddy certainly used the rim!
And then he said a rude word!

I have never played an accidental rim click in my life. They were all meant to be - otherwise they would never have existed, right?
 

MisterZero

Senior Member
i went back and listened to the ZZ top La Grange and didnt thikn the quad fill he did was off.... maybe i just heard that song a million times on the radio and have gotten used to it.
i played it again. I think there are two versions of this song. But, if you listen, the first quad roll, if you break them into two, each one starting from the snare, is off. the second, he must've reeled in better, that one was o.k. IMO.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
Speaking of La Grange (and I agree about that quad thing sounding kind of sloppy), don't they drop a beat coming back in after the rim clicks heading to the outro? I haven't listened closely to that part in a while, but I recall there being something weird going on there.

Just goes to show how little sloppy drumming matters in the context of great music.
 

LarryG

Junior Member
Crossroads by Cream form the "Wheels of Fire Album" (live at the fillmore), after the guitar solo when the verse starts again always seemed a little off to me. (it's at 3:34 on the you tube video) Sorry, I know from the OP that this is supposed to be studio recordings. Also, On the Emerson, Lake and Palmer album Trilogy, one of my favorites is on the song "The Sheriff". Right at the beginning at 0:13 Carl stops, says S#!T, then starts over.
 
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drstrangefunk

Senior Member
Crossroads by Cream form the "Wheels of Fire Album" (live at the fillmore), after the guitar solo when the verse starts again always seemed a little off to me. (it's at 3:34 on the you tube video) Sorry, I know from the OP that this is supposed to be studio recordings. Also, On the Emerson, Lake and Palmer album Trilogy, one of my favorites is on the song "The Sheriff". Right at the beginning at 0:13 Carl stops, says S#!T, then starts over.
re: "Crossroads", i always thought there was an edit right after the guitar solo to fix the fact that Clapton was soloing on the offbeat the whole while....if we're talking about the usual live "Crossroads".
 

Road Bull

Silver Member
Didn't have a prob with 2:48 but 2:41 was off. It sounded like he was having trouble with the feel generally.


Not sure if it was Face Lift of Dirt, but he prematurely removed a cast from a broken wrist to record one of these if I remember correctly.
 

MisterZero

Senior Member
Speaking of La Grange (and I agree about that quad thing sounding kind of sloppy), don't they drop a beat coming back in after the rim clicks heading to the outro? I haven't listened closely to that part in a while, but I recall there being something weird going on there.
Yes. it's definitely different than the first time around. And, in a second version, Beard hits the snare twice instead of once at particular spot. it's funny, I always thought there were two versions because of the quad roll issue, but both versions have the same problem. I don't know why they recorded it twice. maybe they enhanced or something.
 
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