Can micro-scratches be fixed?

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
It's not sandpaper ;) 200 grit wet&dry with soapy water. Been doing this professionally since I was 17. Will continue to do so. You do it your way.
'1200' wet and dry. Or sandpaper as it's known.
If I my car ever needs a polish and I decide to have it sanded down, you're my go to guy 😉
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Sense prevails.
I suspect we have 2 different interpretations of the word 'microscratches'.
I'm talking about the swirls of almost invisible scratches that can catch in certain lights. I think you might be talking about more substantial stuff that cutting compounds and polishes can't deal with.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I suspect we have 2 different interpretations of the word 'microscratches'.
I'm talking about the swirls of almost invisible scratches that can catch in certain lights. I think you might be talking about more substantial stuff that cutting compounds and polishes can't deal with.
The only issue I have with any of the proposed methodologies is that we don't know whether the phosphor-bronze snare has a poly coat, or is bare metal. The proper fix wholly depends on whichever material was scratched.
 

Frosticles

Silver Member
I suspect we have 2 different interpretations of the word 'microscratches'.
I'm talking about the swirls of almost invisible scratches that can catch in certain lights. I think you might be talking about more substantial stuff that cutting compounds and polishes can't deal with.
Nope. Swirls etc, hence "Micro scratches" If you want to do it properly then that is the way to address them. The cars I restored are concours standard. Used to be RS Escorts, Now moved onto Porsche's so, they have to be right :)

24063_381769858868_145071_n by Kevin Frost, on Flickr
92357833_10157341876363869_1311030417687576576_n by Kevin Frost, on Flickr
90160640_10157297411408869_2757702448112992256_n by Kevin Frost, on Flickr
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Nope. Swirls etc, hence "Micro scratches" If you want to do it properly then that is the way to address them. The cars I restored are concours standard. Used to be RS Escorts, Now moved onto Porsche's so, they have to be right .
Then we'll have to disagree that the best way to get microscratches out is to put macroscratches in.
I hand flatted this car with 1200 grit, then mopped back to a gloss. But to smooth out the finish, not to remove microscratches..Ultima-Sports-10.jpg.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I have four words for you: CAPE COD POLISHING CLOTH. I recently got some light scratches on my nice Hamilton stainless steel watch, and practically everyone in the watch forums recommended this. And you know what? They’re 100% right! I ended up polishing all my watches with this cloth, and it worked great! Like it never happened.

Now I can’t recommend this enough. I’m sure it will work equally well on your snare.
I just ordered a 2-pack of these from Amazon. They should arrive Tuesday. I really, really hope this works...
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
The only issue I have with any of the proposed methodologies is that we don't know whether the phosphor-bronze snare has a poly coat, or is bare metal. The proper fix wholly depends on whichever material was scratched.
This is so important to know. Great thought KmaK
 
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