Can a subpar hi-hat stand impede your hi-hat skill progression?

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
For young beginners I may drop the hats all the way down to take the issue out of the equation completely, but as soon as you start using the left foot you want it high enough to get the volume you want. There are no real rules there as long as it's comfortable and you can get all the sounds you want.

Getting the left foot going usually takes a while as if you haven't been doing it at all your left foot hasn't been doing much up until then. This would be one of the reasons I try to get any student that's up for it to do 2 & 4 as soon as possible. When we really start using it we basically start by removing the right hand and playing everything we've learned so far with the left foot instead. That makes sure things are solid before we get all 4 limbs working again.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I have the “opened” part of the hi hats facing me. I’m not sure if that’s what you mean or not. The angle of the photo may suggest otherwise. However, I can try playing around with that a bit and see if I have better luck. Thanks!

As for top hat height, I’ve tried a bunch of different configurations and the spacing I have now seems to work the best for me at the moment, but again, I’ll continue to play with this and see if I can find a better solution.
What @AzHeat is suggesting as I have earlier in the thread is that you have the "opened" part of the hi hats facing away from you and the "closed" part closest to you. Look at your hi hat when you have your foot on them and you'll notice that the bottom cymbal's edge protrudes out creating the perfect environment for shredding your sticks. My first drum teacher taught me this and I've been doing it that way ever since.
 

JDFaulky

Member
What @AzHeat is suggesting as I have earlier in the thread is that you have the "opened" part of the hi hats facing away from you and the "closed" part closest to you. Look at your hi hat when you have your foot on them and you'll notice that the bottom cymbal's edge protrudes out creating the perfect environment for shredding your sticks. My first drum teacher taught me this and I've been doing it that way ever since.
I see what you’re saying. I thought I did have them the wya you described, but I closed my hats and my bottom hat did stick out a little bit. I turned them around and it feels just as well, if not better. Thanks for the suggestion!

I guess I never seen any drummers have them orientated that way so the way I had it I figured was THE way to do it. I thought opening the hats wouldn’t work as well this way but I don’t seem to have any trouble.

Even though I’m doing very well on my own, I did have a family-owned music store near me that offered drum lessons when I bought the kit. It’s quite affordable and it would be nice to have someone observe and help me course correct. However, my wife works crazy inconsistent hours and I have two small children at home, so it would be tough to commit to it.
 

fobz

Active member
Hi hat control is completely different than kick pedal control, it's mainly about finesse, and that takes time. Absolutely, buy a good hi hat stand (it feels much better), but it's not going to actually improve your technique. Just keep working at it, and one day it'll click and you'll be much better without even having noticed it happening.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
The fact that it's cheap isn't a problem, but if it feels stiff, doesn't respond quickly and lacks adjustment, that can definitely hold you back. I've used an inexpensive PDP Concept stand for years and have been happy with it.
 
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TMe

Senior Member
If I should toss this hi-hat stand and get a new one, does anyone have any recommendations that would fit a newer drummer working on his hi-hat skills?
It's a bit like the advice everyone gives about picking your first guitar. Just pick the one that feels right.

That advice is useless because you won't know what feels right until after you can play guitar. The advice is really saying that you should just play with what you've got, try as many different instruments as you can, and eventually you'll know what you want. There's not much point spending money on new gear before then.
 
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