Camping: grab your sticks and pad and head to the woods!!

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
The trick is rubbing two drum sticks together real fast to start a fire or playing your pad so fast material combust on it if you lay leaf litter on it. Only Arjun can do the latter. Myself I always carry a Bic lighter-have for 50 years and it has always been handy.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
The trick is rubbing two drum sticks together real fast to start a fire or playing your pad so fast material combust on it if you lay leaf litter on it. Only Arjun can do the latter. Myself I always carry a Bic lighter-have for 50 years and it has always been handy.

Always carry three ways. :)
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
With the job I had a couple of years ago I was pretty much living the van life. Had some stuff stored at work, at my parents place and in a storage facility in the city. The big reason for my focus on pads and various pad kits mostly came from that.

Things are a litle bit dfferent now, but had life been a little bit simpler (aka without the narcissitic abuse and legal matters that maytake the rest of my life), this and drumming would be my main things.

Here's from the first overnighter with my new setup. Leaning towards the basic, simple and military grade stuff now.

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Yes, when a bear isn't afraid of people anymore there's not much you can do. Bears run on instinct and do not function like we do. Obviously, people are to blame because we're stupid. Most of the time bears should be of no concern. I understand it may be a bit more complicated in other places than where I live.

man, you are so lucky to live that close to all of that beautiful terrain!! Scandinavia - Sweden specifically (because my ancestors are from Uppsala) - is a bucket list place that I want to visit eventually.

and yes, we have usurped their territory, and then we get surprised when they get mad at us for being there
 

Juniper

Gold Member
Love camping, we own two tents and before having dogs and a child would go whenever we could.

Few times we loaded the tent into the car, got the ferry from the UK to France and would just choose somewhere in Europe to head towards, find a campsite on route and rock up and explore the area before heading off the next day to wherever we picked on the map.

The best one was heading to Switzerland in the summer and setting up on Lake Geneva for a few days as I spent a number of weeks there years ago and love the area (eventually got heat stroke but this a story for another day)

The drive through the French/Swiss alps the way there was stunning.

Can’t wait to get back camping.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Love camping, we own two tents and before having dogs and a child would go whenever we could.

Few times we loaded the tent into the car, got the ferry from the UK to France and would just choose somewhere in Europe to head towards, find a campsite on route and rock up and explore the area before heading off the next day to wherever we picked on the map.

The best one was heading to Switzerland and setting up on Lake Geneva for a few days (eventually got heat stroke but this a story for another day)

The drive through the French/Swiss alps the way there was stunning.
How does this work? Are borders free to cross in Europe? Here it requires an act of god almost. Also, does everyone in Europe speak multiple languages?
 

Juniper

Gold Member
How does this work? Are borders free to cross in Europe? Here it requires an act of god almost. Also, does everyone in Europe speak multiple languages?
Haven't been since the UK left the European Union recently (don't get me started on that!!!) but before you'd simply enter a check point upon arrival to the country, show your passport whilst remaining in your car and away you go.

It was very simple, no visas needed for where we went. The only cost was paying the tolls for using the roads, which did add up on a long trip.

Regarding the languages it depends. Most people have a grasp of English but we always make an effort to learn some of the local languages to show respect and get by with basic phrases. We've found that most locals appreciate it when you make an effort.

In Switzerland (for example) most people we came across speak primarily either French or German (depending on the side of the country you go to) and we learned both French and German in school so it was ok to recap on our knowledge before we arrived.

Traveling through mainland Europe is an absolutely Fantastic experience, the roads are mostly clear and well organised and the views are mostly stunning. I'd live there if I could and cannot recommend it enough.
 
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