Buzz Stroke Help - Elementary Mitchell Peters (PG. 41)

FrankieFrankie

New Member
So I'm working out of the elementary Mitchell peters book and I'm not sure how to play the buzz strokes on pg. 41. What's the subdivision for these excersizes? I've been using quintuplet buzz rolling so I can alternate between L and R easily, but I thought the notation for these rolls would be an even subdivision, like eight 32nd notes.

PXL_20220427_220703486~2.jpg
 

BGDurham

Well-known Member
I am not familiar with this book, but the first line just looks like an example line (it is "lettered" a and b), whereas the rest of the lines look like actual exercises (they are numbered). I think the first line is just to get you buzzing and stopping--buzz rest buzz rest buzz rest, and so on--so you have the feel of transitioning between buzzing and resting that you'll need for the numbered exercises. The numbered exercises are in traditional 4/4 time and look pretty self-explanatory, time-wise. Hope that helps.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
No subdivision at all on that page-- play those as single buzz strokes, not rolls.

Actual rolls can be played with any subdivision-- depending on the tempo of the piece. Whatever subdivision makes a good sounding roll at that tempo.
 
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jda

Active Member
Fzzz....tick..tick...tick...Fzzz...tick ..tick..tick

just make sure your "Fzzz" takes up the time (space of 1 quarter-note nothing more
almost; lay down both sticks at once..see if, you can get away with that.
 

jda

Active Member
in fact they may be just single strokes- One-hand- is why there is "R and L..
One hand dribbles- length of 1 quarter

in fact I think so because it says Buzz Strokes no implication of '2-hand- alternating/ +/- ?
just, one-hand drop strokes..
 

Jonathan Curtis

Silver Member
If it were me, with no other explanation provided, I would essentially play those rolls as four buzzed 16th notes.

So the very top exercise at (a), I would play:

RLRL (rest) RLRL (rest)

Where each R and L is a buzz stroke, in a 16th note rhythm.

However, the sticking in the later exercises suggests a quintuplet subdivision, and that is how I would play them.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
You might as well practice them all possible ways.

Another thing to practice is triple stroke buzzes and quadruple stroke buzzes.
 

Jonathan Curtis

Silver Member
This is what it is, they're not meant to be played as rolls. I teach from the book, from all of Peters's books, here's how he writes rolls:

View attachment 118906

Ah! I see. They’re literally single individual buzz strokes. Is the Z stem not standard notation for buzz strokes in the US?
 

JimmyM

Gold Member
Often, but you know how percussion music is. Standards are evolving, and can't be relied on.
And that’s what makes reading drum music so hard for me sometimes. I’m trying to get sorted reading music for the set, but it really does seem to be a moving target at times.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
And that’s what makes reading drum music so hard for me sometimes. I’m trying to get sorted reading music for the set, but it really does seem to be a moving target at times.

Yeah, that’s a frustrating reality in concert percussion too. And I have no idea how to solve it
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
No subdivision at all on that page-- play those as single buzz strokes, not rolls.

Actual rolls can be played with any subdivision-- depending on the tempo of the piece. Whatever subdivision makes a good sounding roll at that tempo.
Fzzz....tick..tick...tick...Fzzz...tick ..tick..tick

just make sure your "Fzzz" takes up the time (space of 1 quarter-note nothing more
almost; lay down both sticks at once..see if, you can get away with that.
If it were me, with no other explanation provided, I would essentially play those rolls as four buzzed 16th notes.

So the very top exercise at (a), I would play:

RLRL (rest) RLRL (rest)

Where each R and L is a buzz stroke, in a 16th note rhythm.

However, the sticking in the later exercises suggests a quintuplet subdivision, and that is how I would play them.
You might as well practice them all possible ways.

Another thing to practice is triple stroke buzzes and quadruple stroke buzzes.

pretty much what I was gonna say as well
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
Yeah, that’s a frustrating reality in concert percussion too. And I have no idea how to solve it

yeah...that is a tradition for sure that is it's own "blended family" as far as writing goes

in the past 20 years, there has been some standardization with marching percussion stuff thanks to the publishing companies like Roll-Off, Drop 6 and Tap Space using the Virtual Drumline software to notate things....

but concert/orchestral/classical has hundreds of years of history to comb through
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
yeah...that is a tradition for sure that is it's own "blended family" as far as writing goes

in the past 20 years, there has been some standardization with marching percussion stuff thanks to the publishing companies like Roll-Off, Drop 6 and Tap Space using the Virtual Drumline software to notate things....

but concert/orchestral/classical has hundreds of years of history to comb through

Marching percussion is a wonderland of consistency compared to orchestral. Although the weird rubato way that rudiments and even Sousa marches were played back in the day would be super-challenging to notate. Have you ever heard a recording of Frank Arsenault playing flamacues, or Sousa’s actual band playing a march?
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
Marching percussion is a wonderland of consistency compared to orchestral. Although the weird rubato way that rudiments and even Sousa marches were played back in the day would be super-challenging to notate. Have you ever heard a recording of Frank Arsenault playing flamacues, or Sousa’s actual band playing a march?

I have herd Arsenault play...not flamacues specifically, but even the old NARD tradition of writing rudiments has changed. A lot of things were written one way, but then the player was supposed to know how to interpret it given the context...which is actually sort of cool in a way.

I need to check to see if the Sousa Band recordings are on streaming services. I have some CD's of that music in storage, but haven't listened to them sincet he mid 2000's

I remember in college, we did a version of the Stars and Stripes Forever, and the 2nd time though the end - where the brass all stand - was notated as flammed 5 stroke rolls. So I learned it that way. The version my community group uses is notated as just 5 stroke rolls. I still play the flammed 5 b/c the version we used in college was a much "older" arrangement...probably from the 50's, and I feel like it is closer to the originql intent

I remember when I was preparing rep for my symphony audition in college, it was definitely like taking a separate language course!
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I have herd Arsenault play...not flamacues specifically, but even the old NARD tradition of writing rudiments has changed. A lot of things were written one way, but then the player was supposed to know how to interpret it given the context...which is actually sort of cool in a way.

I need to check to see if the Sousa Band recordings are on streaming services. I have some CD's of that music in storage, but haven't listened to them sincet he mid 2000's

I remember in college, we did a version of the Stars and Stripes Forever, and the 2nd time though the end - where the brass all stand - was notated as flammed 5 stroke rolls. So I learned it that way. The version my community group uses is notated as just 5 stroke rolls. I still play the flammed 5 b/c the version we used in college was a much "older" arrangement...probably from the 50's, and I feel like it is closer to the originql intent

I remember when I was preparing rep for my symphony audition in college, it was definitely like taking a separate language course!

My teacher told me the flammed 5-strokes were the way Sousa’s actual band played it, but the published parts were just regular 5-strokes. Don’t know how true it is, but I definitely practice it with the flams, in case I ever have to play it with a community band or something.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
My teacher told me the flammed 5-strokes were the way Sousa’s actual band played it, but the published parts were just regular 5-strokes. Don’t know how true it is, but I definitely practice it with the flams, in case I ever have to play it with a community band or something.

yeah...the prof who conducted the band when I was in college had actually worked with the Sousa band, and I believe actually did some clinics with King or maybe Fillmore when he was young, and that was one of the reasons we did that version...it was awesome to hear him tell stories about those experiences.

and i play it that way as well out respect for the original intent
 
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