Burying the Beater

mrfingers

Senior Member
Try heel down and allow the bounce back to not bury the beater. Getting use to this allows you to play multiple beats using that bounce back control. Besides, you won’t have to lose the time to “prime” muscles for the next stroke, the un-buried beater will be ready for it.
 

moodman

Well-known Member
I played heel down for 39 years but decided to explore heel up. I found I could play with more volume, even lift the kick up on it's spurs. I also found that I could play much softer heel up, using the beater with a stroke muffling the head. So, now I play both heel up and down and burying the beater in different ways. At this point it is automatic, I don't think about it or really notice when I switch from one to the other. It is just a part of my dynamics now.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry" - Administrator
Staff member
I guess I just was looking for more tips on how not to bury it. Not so much if I should or not. I try and avoid those YouTube videos haha. It sounds like it’s up to the drummer!
I haven't seen this mentioned so I'll mention it. Getting your foot out of the way is the key if you want to rebound without dribbles. My "get my foot out of the way" speed is as fast as my striking speed. It's either bury or rebound, I don't believe there is anything in the middle. I use an unported BD reso head and I can't bury the beater because of the extra dribbles. So I rebound. Which to my ear has I'm guessing triple the bass response of a buried beater (unmiced). I like the tone better. A lot of greats bury the beater. I don't like that sound for myself personally.

I play heel down 99% of the time and my BD stroke consists of 2 parts. First I strike the beater on the head, and then as quickly as I can...lift my toes up after the strike to make room for the pedal returning to it's "ready" position.. A two part stroke (hit/rebound is what I do. It may or may not work for you but that's all I got.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
I keep seeing people talk about unported heads being harder to bury on, but I have never had that issue on my jazz kick - 22" 1955 Luddy. I have a Fiberskyn Powerstroke 3 on the batter and a Remo white bass logo head on the front. This is my jazz and country drum set, and I do everything from super soft brush gigs to Whiskey River and Guitars and Cadillacs on this kick. Heel up....old, old DW 5000 strap driven pedal....
 
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