Buddy Rich's Modern Interpretation of Modern Snare Drum Rudiments

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
what? How is that even possible/comfortable/doable?

I am planning on getting sick from my 2nd COVID shot tomorrow, so I might spend the down time seeing why this would be a preferable way to play doubles...weird


It took me a few weeks to get it up to speed. I mainly use it as a way to help remember to stay loose when playing doubles.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member

It took me a few weeks to get it up to speed. I mainly use it as a way to help remember to stay loose when playing doubles.

so I didn't get sick...but yeah, I see how it definitely helps the stroke feel sort of..."rounded" in a way...have been doing it only slow so far, and the feel of "fluidity" is there...it is also feeling like that it would help ghosting as well...
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Another thing I notice is that the Buddy Rich book goes through "ruffs" as alternating single stroke rudiments, but other methods don't always include "ruffs". I also have seen the ruff as a LLR or RRL with two ghost notes and then the third being the stroke. I thought this was a "drag", not a "ruff"?

The names of the rudiments have changed over time. When I was learning the NARD 26 Essential Rudiments, a ruff was llR, rrL, and a drag was RllRL, LrrLR. Now, the llR, rrL rudiment is called a drag.

I still use the older names.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I absolutely love this book, was one of the first books I worked on with my late great teacher...
Same here, only my teacher was the same guy (Ted MacKenzie) who ended up rewriting the book. This was well before he rewrote it however.

The twisting that keeps getting brought up, it's not necessary. That's the Adler technique. It's the snapping motion that's important. I play and learned this book using German grip. The idea is to learn the motions as a snap, then go back and learn them as a bounce stroke, then go back and add speed. Ted uses the Adler technique so he teaches with it. You don't have to do it that way.

Another part of the Adler technique is a pinching of the stick between the thumb and pointer finger. This I do use.
 
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