Bruce Becker- hand technique

Sebenza

Member
He's got his own yt channel too, on which he shows various rudiments and the technique he applies to them. Pretty good stuff, I've been subbed to him for quite a while.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Good stuff. Clearly he's a leading authority on technique, and a great communicator. A couple of the most important things in the video don't really have anything to do with high-performance technique-- the parts about sound, and about listening to music.

You do have to already be a serious student or professional for the concerns here to be an issue. Most people need to just take the quickest way to baseline musical competency, with basically functional technique. It's good to be aware of what he's talking about, but if you're spending a lot of time focusing on subtle technique issues when you haven't already put in many thousands of hours of practice playing content... it doesn't really work that way.
 

jazzerooty

Junior Member
I've done quite amount of study on rudiments and hand-techniques over the years. I've delved into Moeller, the Spivak approach, Adler, Gladstone, etc. The more I learn, the less I seem to know. I do notice that adherents to a particular system of techique application seem to be afraid to just let go. There are loads of approaches and many paths to the waterfall. Practice what works for you.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I've done quite amount of study on rudiments and hand-techniques over the years. I've delved into Moeller, the Spivak approach, Adler, Gladstone, etc. The more I learn, the less I seem to know. I do notice that adherents to a particular system of techique application seem to be afraid to just let go. There are loads of approaches and many paths to the waterfall. Practice what works for you.
I can relate to all of this. The more I study technique, the less I “know”
 

TMe

Senior Member
...if you're spending a lot of time focusing on subtle technique issues when you haven't already put in many thousands of hours of practice playing content... it doesn't really work that way.
I look at it as two separate projects. As a fan of drumming, I like to learn about the subtle and tricky stuff and I spend time with it on the practice pad. As a player, I leave all that behind once I'm behind the kit and just stick to the basics.

In the back of my mind I keep thinking all the subtle and tricky stuff will come in handy some day, maybe... but probably not.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Sure. Looking around the internet I just get the feeling people focus on this because they don't know what else to do-- there are a ton of hyper nuanced technique videos, practically nothing telling people how to develop as a musician-- beyond ~ junior high level.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Sure. Looking around the internet I just get the feeling people focus on this because they don't know what else to do-- there are a ton of hyper nuanced technique videos, practically nothing telling people how to develop as a musician-- beyond ~ junior high level.
I can’t speak for everyone, but for me, getting the technique in really good shape HELPS me play more musically, listen better, etc.. If I’m spending all my time struggling with technique, I’ve got less focus left for listening and blending my sound, playing with good feel, and such.
 

TMe

Senior Member
Sure. Looking around the internet I just get the feeling people focus on this because they don't know what else to do-- there are a ton of hyper nuanced technique videos, practically nothing telling people how to develop as a musician-- beyond ~ junior high level.
I can see that. For me, working on the pure technique stuff helped with ergonomics, so I could play without wrecking my back or my hands. So if someone's technique is truly dreadful, as mine was, working on technique can be worthwhile. I gotta say, though, as much as I feel the difference technique has made, it hasn't really changed how I sound very much. I can't say it's really improved my playing.
 
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