BREAKING STICKS

DannyMeazell

Junior Member
I may be old school but I have played and jammed with a lot of bands in garages, homes, auditoriums, arenas, studios, and Live televised! I have played since I was 3. One of my first things I did, with hundreds of hours of practice, was go through every stick made! In my early years I discovered a new type of wood being used by a then young company Promark. I settled in with the Promark 7a Japan Oak. I was taught by Robert BOB Taylor and Louie Belson who are jazz drummers and favor smaller sticks. With every Stick company out there, I went through a lot of sticks. I am considered a grade or two above a hard hitter. I play the rim a lot! One old band leader once told me play with small sticks so your not so loud. I said these are the small sticks! My Hi Hat stand is often covered by sawdust from wareing away at sticks! Of all the sticks I used the PROMARK 7A Japan oak outlasted every other make of 7A on the market.
During the years I was in the school And in the combos and in bands that played everywhere, those PROMARK 7A sticks did me good! Later a friend, Hall of fame drummer Linda Waring, introduced me to another drum stick that lasted even longer, was more resilient , and felt incredible! It was the PROMARK 747W B. One of the longer sticks at 16 3/4" and heavier, it's easy on the hands. I will stick by two things! PROMARK, though to be fair I have tried them all and the Japan Oak. I am looking at another stick now because of the tip! It's the 707 W in Japan Oak. The only recent issue I have had since Promark was bought out is it seems that when I open a new brick of sticks these new sticks feel slick as snot! I am having to use Sex Wax more and more to hold on to them. Other than that ,I am good to go!
 

thebarak

Senior Member
If you're breaking sticks, it's probably due to holding them too tight, or other general bad technique. Letting the sticks breathe by holding them a little more loosely and maybe repositioning your fulcrum should help.
Yes, on a practice pad in a silent room, with hickory sticks, you should hear the sticks resonate like a quiet marimba. If you don't, then you are probably holding them too tightly. This is one of the greatest practice tips ever and really helps all drummers.
 

donnyf

Junior Member
Back playing drums after retiring from work. Ive been using 5B hickerys and find they shread at the hi hat till the neck gets narrow and then they break. Never had this problem back in the 70s. Little scared to go to oak which is probably what I used years ago, cymbals are not cheap.
Please let me know if I got this right.
Thanks
 

gish

Senior Member
Back playing drums after retiring from work. Ive been using 5B hickerys and find they shread at the hi hat till the neck gets narrow and then they break. Never had this problem back in the 70s. Little scared to go to oak which is probably what I used years ago, cymbals are not cheap.
Please let me know if I got this right.
Thanks
Sounds like your hats are too high. Lower them a bit and focus on playing the tip of the stick on the top of the hats, and you should see a big difference in the life of your sticks.
 

mike d

Silver Member
Back playing drums after retiring from work. Ive been using 5B hickerys and find they shread at the hi hat till the neck gets narrow and then they break. Never had this problem back in the 70s. Little scared to go to oak which is probably what I used years ago, cymbals are not cheap.
Please let me know if I got this right.
Thanks
I don't think oak will damage you cymbals unless you are playing abusively. I used them for years. I switched to Maple and now I can't go back. Mine still shred at the neck where I play hat (as did the oak and hickory I've used). When it starts getting alarmingly thin, I know it's time for new sticks. Maybe in the 70s you weren't playing the hat on edge as much? I do all the time, because that's how I get the sound I want.
 

Twakeshima

Active member
I break almost all of my standard 5As and snap anything thinner like a twig. The best experience I’ve had for the cheapest price is some nice 55As or Extreme 5As both are pretty durable and cheap. I also prefer the feel of these.
 

fess

Senior Member
Back playing drums after retiring from work. Ive been using 5B hickerys and find they shread at the hi hat till the neck gets narrow and then they break. Never had this problem back in the 70s. Little scared to go to oak which is probably what I used years ago, cymbals are not cheap.
Please let me know if I got this right.
Thanks
I have the same problem. I like playing the edge of the hats but it wears the neck of the sticks
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
There is a solution to the stick-breaking problem: technique. For example, you can stop milling the sticks on the hihat by playing sloshes with the drum sticks shank on the bow of the top hat cymbal instead of playing on the cymbal edge.

Likewise, one can almost eliminate stick breakage on the drums with proper technique, as well. I'm slowly drifting off to sleep now, so I don't have time to explain it. If anybody wants to know what this technique is, I'll explain it tomorrow, if the Lord is willing and the creek doesn't rise. Good night, all.

GeeDeeEmm
 

iCe

Senior Member
There is a solution to the stick-breaking problem: technique. For example, you can stop milling the sticks on the hihat by playing sloshes with the drum sticks shank on the bow of the top hat cymbal instead of playing on the cymbal edge.
I can't remember when i broke a stick. The neck gets worn down after a time and then i (as i like to call it) 'retire' a set of sticks because they start to feel off-balance. That's mostly just before the point the stick will break, but over the years i'm more in control and have my cymbals etc. angled in such a way that i don't hit edges of cymbals/rims etc. dead on. So i relate to the above post
 

Jazzim

Member
Yes, I would love to have you explain it!

There is a solution to the stick-breaking problem: technique. For example, you can stop milling the sticks on the hihat by playing sloshes with the drum sticks shank on the bow of the top hat cymbal instead of playing on the cymbal edge.

Likewise, one can almost eliminate stick breakage on the drums with proper technique, as well. I'm slowly drifting off to sleep now, so I don't have time to explain it. If anybody wants to know what this technique is, I'll explain it tomorrow, if the Lord is willing and the creek doesn't rise. Good night, all.

GeeDeeEmm
 

drumnut87

Well-known member
main thing that breaks my sticks is rimshots on the drums, wears them out after a good while (and im talking months and months) but sometimes sticks break purely due to a fault in the wood, can play them for a small amount of time and they just shatter. happens with all manfacturers from time to time.
 
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