Brand new to drums ... looking for wisdom

rickycrypto

Junior Member
I'm 40 and just bought an electronic kit (live in a townhome). I know absolutely NOTHING about drums. I got the kit hooked up and working (for the most part). Now I'm wondering where to start. I'm having a little bit of a hard time just hitting the high hat to the metronome (built into the e-kit) one hit at a time!!!

I downloaded a metronome app and started sleeping with it going trying to get some sense of time wired into my brain. I'm divorced so I have 3 to 4 hours a day to practice on weekdays, more on weekends.

Where do I start? I can't afford lessons right at the moment but hope to be able to do that at some point. Do I get a book? Do I start with something like learn and master drums? Any help, suggestions, and/or advice is welcome.

Edit: I just placed an order on Amazon for 1. The complete idiots guide to playing drums 2nd edition / 2. Progressive Steps to Syncopation for the Modern Drummer / 3. Stick Control: For the Snare Drummer / 4. Accents and Rebounds: For the Snare Drummer / 5. A pair of hornet 5a drumsticks (blue) ...... I'm pretty sure that should keep me busy .... any suggestions?
 
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MrPockets

Gold Member
Maybe get a beginner snare book to get used to reading notation. Tommy Igoe groove essentials 1, Ultimate Realistic Rock by Carmine Appice.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
A lot of people start by playing to their favorite songs, that they think they might be able to pull off. AC/DC is a good start. The first requirement to playing the drums is really wanting to do it.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
If the desire to play is there, maybe get with a good local teacher in your area. It may seem expensive but it will clear alot of issues up right away. Basically it sounds like you need someone to point you in the right direction with what goals you have in mind. It'd be a good $60 investment.
 

jgvideira

Junior Member
I'm 40 and just bought an electronic kit (live in a townhome). I know absolutely NOTHING about drums. I got the kit hooked up and working (for the most part). Now I'm wondering where to start. I'm having a little bit of a hard time just hitting the high hat to the metronome (built into the e-kit) one hit at a time!!!

I downloaded a metronome app and started sleeping with it going trying to get some sense of time wired into my brain. I'm divorced so I have 3 to 4 hours a day to practice on weekdays, more on weekends.

Where do I start? I can't afford lessons right at the moment but hope to be able to do that at some point. Do I get a book? Do I start with something like learn and master drums? Any help, suggestions, and/or advice is welcome.

Edit: I just placed an order on Amazon for 1. The complete idiots guide to playing drums 2nd edition / 2. Progressive Steps to Syncopation for the Modern Drummer / 3. Stick Control: For the Snare Drummer / 4. Accents and Rebounds: For the Snare Drummer / 5. A pair of hornet 5a drumsticks (blue) ...... I'm pretty sure that should keep me busy .... any suggestions?
The books you bought are pretty essential, as you might know by the research you did.

Playing along to music is a good way to start because of drumming learning curve overall, you'll be able to see huge improvements and keep yourself motivated by that.
Still, give some time to play through rudiments.. after feeling a bit confident actually playing some grooves the books should be your main focus.

Thats how I do it:
Practicing everyday for at least 2 hours going through:
16th notes with double bass on metronome while playing different patterns with my hands claves, rudiments and so on;
Encyclopedia of double bass drumming (keep going back to it);
Rudiments on pillow;
Stick Control (4 exercises a day);
Latin rythms (as im brazilian that should be expected for gigs here).

50% focus on double bass (as im new to it) and 50% on sticking/grooves.

Now thats all done with a metronome and no music what so ever, its really boring at times but I try not to skip one single session. People say you wont learn anything when you are bored, well... I disagree, muscle memory too, i guess and thats been proven to me at least.

Once a week or in two weeks I play through with songs - that aspect is mainly motivacional as I record my playing and can see the improvements.

I've been playing for over 10 years now and stablished this routine 5 months ago, also, i write down everything each session. If i did that a couple of years ago... man!

And yeah, you should go for a teacher whenever you can.
 

coolhand1969

Senior Member
The books you bought are great and I do not discount them at all. However, you do not want to get overly caught in techniqe. I would suggest spending 20% of your time on the technical aspects and the rest just playing the instrument by yourself and then spend some time having fun playing along with songs you enjoy. The whole key is having fun, wanting to get behind the kit because you love it. Below are some very easy songs which I play for fun and to warm-up:

1. Against the Wind - Bob Seger
2. Lola- The Kinks
3. Someone Saved My Life Tonight - Elton John
4. Hotel California Live Version - Eagles
5. Give Me One Reason To Stay Here- Live Version Tracy Chapman and Eric Clapton
6. I'm Moving Out- Billy Joel
7. Luckenbach Texas- Kid Rock And Kenney Wayne Chesney
8. Over The Hills And Far Away- John Tams
9. Hot Legs- Rod Stewart
10. Sloop John B-Beach Boys
11. Son Of A Preacher Man- Dusty Springfield
12. The Ballad Of Curtis Lowe-Skynyrd
13. The Night Santa Went Crazy-Weird Al
14. Two Out Of Three-Meatloaf
15. Your So Vain-Carly Simon
 

rickycrypto

Junior Member
Thanks for all of the input. I LOVE me some ac/dc ... I've got a ton of their stuff on my ipod - just have to get a cable to hook it up to the e-kit and go play!

I played around with the eq so I can hear the drums a little better. This is a blast!

I can't wait for the books to get here. I think I'll just split it evenly between beating the hell out of the kit to some good tunes and practicing the technical stuff.

Merry Christmas everyone and again - Thanks for the help!
 

TOMANO

Senior Member
A couple of tips and suggestions:

1. Learn the snare rudiments and then practice applying them around the kit, mixing up "stickings" with different drums and feet.

2. Syncopation is a great book. Use the snare / bass patterns and apply hi-hat or ride cymbal to the exercises...quarters, 8ths, 16ths and triplet swing.

3. Warm up before you practice with singles and doubles.

4. Practice SLOW tempos.

5. Give yourself one "breakthrough" to accomplish each week.

Peace, MT
 

ronyd

Silver Member
or
Jeff Johnson's: great book all about stick height and easy to understand. Highly recommend
http://www.alfred.com/Products/The-Level-System--00-38963.aspx

Ditto, also :
STICK CONTROL, first page.

Also so many countless books, but maybe:
http://www.alfred.com/Products/Alfreds-Drum-Method-Book-1--00-23196.aspx

Alfred's Drum Method, Complete
Anyone of these DVDs maybe:
** Tommy Igoe - Lifetime; great for beginning.
Jim Chapin - Speed, Power, Control, Endurance
JoJo Mayer - Secret Weapons

Website:
freedrumlessons.com ; plenty of videos and music sheets
onlinedrummer.com ; plenty of videos and music sheets

Gotta get confidence in your hands I would think. Holding stick properly, bouncing the sticks, etc. Unless you want to just bang away.

For now, I would just pick the sticks up (matched the easiest to get started), set metronome. like 60bpm, and play on the snare alternate sticking (RLRLRL....) to get your internal clock going. Get a sense of how the stick is reacting in relation to your hands and hitting the pad. Tommy Igoe shows you very clearly.

Tons and Tons of stuff out there to really get innodated and confused, unfortunately.

If you can I would definitely take a lesson when can. Your 40, so you have plenty of time to accomplish stuff. I on the other hand, began much later in life, so I'm practicing and taking lessons alot. Basically my big passion. Takes time to understand all the concepts. Still very much a fun passion. Constant learning process.

BTW, amazon.com is a great resource to buy used dvds and books. I do it alot and have a great collection of both for drumming.

Great choice man. Practice and have fun.
 
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S

savage8190

Guest
I just started too...I have a really good sense of timing I find from playing guitar, and I can read music, so I've got a bit of a head start. Other than that though I'm a total newb and cant afford lessons either. I am using Learn and Master Drums...I like being able to see everything instead of just reading it. I also quite like the play along CD's; I've just got them ripped to my PC and I can throw on the headphones and play along to a bunch of stuff. I supplement it with Stick Control and some Youtube videos and it gives me tons to work on.
 
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