Boutique Snares: Q and 7023

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Been digging' the Q Gentlemen's Copper snare. And the 7023 stave snare products, too.

I like the Q because it's 1/2" deeper than most copper snares, and it's unfinished raw so it'll age and patina-up. I like the Ludwig, too, but this Q is 1/2" deeper which will change sound a bit to a deeper fuller sound (I think?).

I like looks of 7023, and that they're built handcrafted in Oregon.

Any thoughts or feedback on either Q Gentlemen's Copper or the 7023 snares?
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
Been digging' the Q Gentlemen's Copper snare. And the 7023 stave snare products, too.

I like the Q because it's 1/2" deeper than most copper snares, and it's unfinished raw so it'll age and patina-up. I like the Ludwig, too, but this Q is 1/2" deeper which will change sound a bit to a deeper fuller sound (I think?).

I like looks of 7023, and that they're built handcrafted in Oregon.

Any thoughts or feedback on either Q Gentlemen's Copper or the 7023 snares?
There's a Q dealer near me and I've seen a couple of their snare drums. They look and sound awesome. I don't know if the added depth will necessarily give a deeper sound, but I think it'll sound more open.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
It's not spun and not raw, but the Gretsch USA copper drum is a great sounding drum. Probably more focused sounding than the Q due to the die cast hoops and 10 lugs. I've tapped on one and thought it sounded great, but different than stuff like the Q drums. Cheaper at $549.

I'd recommend checking out Oriollo's spun copper shell. The aluminum Phantom 65 I got from them sounds amazing. I have no doubt the copper one does too. Great hardware and those drums are all about body and tone.
 

steadypocket

Gold Member
Love my Q copper Gentleman's snare. Gave me the copper sound I was looking for that a previously-owned snare didn't. Very versatile.
 

Attachments

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Yup that Q copper is beautiful, and in video they sound fantastic too. They're gearing up for another run in 2-3 months. Not sure I wanna wait that long.

I'm making inquiry to Oriollo to see what's available.

Love my Q copper Gentleman's snare. Gave me the copper sound I was looking for that a previously-owned snare didn't. Very versatile.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
Yup that Q copper is beautiful, and in video they sound fantastic too. They're gearing up for another run in 2-3 months. Not sure I wanna wait that long.

I'm making inquiry to Oriollo to see what's available.
I wonder why spun copper drums seem to be made in runs? Vukan at Oriollo said he's gearing up for a run of the copper too. Copper supplies maybe? Time intensive doing copper shells?
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I wonder why spun copper drums seem to be made in runs?
My 8th grade shop class taught me that....

Each time you change the alloy, you likely need to rework the entire machine, whether it be the rotational speed, feed rate, depth settings, etc. The first two parts through are usually scrapped as adjustments to the rollers made. When drilling holes, aluminum is going to require a different lubricant than steel, copper, etc. Scrap alloy needs to be sorted into the appropriate containers as well, which is much faster if you do runs rather than one-offs.

It gets even worse when you're milling parts, as you have to compensate over time for the degradation of your cutting tool. Otherwise part 1000 will end up larger and heavier than part 10.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
My 8th grade shop class taught me that....

Each time you change the alloy, you likely need to rework the entire machine, whether it be the rotational speed, feed rate, depth settings, etc. The first two parts through are usually scrapped as adjustments to the rollers made. When drilling holes, aluminum is going to require a different lubricant than steel, copper, etc. Scrap alloy needs to be sorted into the appropriate containers as well, which is much faster if you do runs rather than one-offs.

It gets even worse when you're milling parts, as you have to compensate over time for the degradation of your cutting tool. Otherwise part 1000 will end up larger and heavier than part 10.
While you were in shop, we were in band. I'm glad at least one of us wasn't a band kid, though. Lol
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
My 8th grade shop class taught me that....

Each time you change the alloy, you likely need to rework the entire machine, whether it be the rotational speed, feed rate, depth settings, etc. The first two parts through are usually scrapped as adjustments to the rollers made. When drilling holes, aluminum is going to require a different lubricant than steel, copper, etc. Scrap alloy needs to be sorted into the appropriate containers as well, which is much faster if you do runs rather than one-offs.

It gets even worse when you're milling parts, as you have to compensate over time for the degradation of your cutting tool. Otherwise part 1000 will end up larger and heavier than part 10.
This makes sense. I took wood shop in 8th grade and all I got was a pair of crappy book ends and a crappier cd rack that I made.
 
Top