Boston the "band" . . . . not a band!

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Interesting, and totally believable.
I’m reading Steve Lukathers’ book right now and I’m surprised/not surprised by his stories. He even said Gene Simmons stopped playing on KISS records altogether after they became a huge spectacle (which might have been as far back as 1975!). According to Lukather he and his cohorts filled in and played on so many big hit records from the 70s until the 90s, some involving non-disclosure agreements - I wouldn’t be surprised if Toto had something to do with every hit album coming out of LA, like the Wrecking Crew before them.

So one guy did Boston? I’m not surprised. It kinda sounds like it 😉
 

Rotarded

Senior Member
So one guy did Boston? I’m not surprised. It kinda sounds like it 😉
Tom Scholz has a masters degree in Electrical Engineering from MIT. He created the "Boston" layered sound electronically, and then the Rockman, so everyone could use it. His genius was not only in engineering, but in music as well. His guitar work/solo on "Hitch a ride" is transcendent.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Tom Scholz has a masters degree in Electrical Engineering from MIT. He created the "Boston" layered sound electronically, and then the Rockman, so everyone could use it. His genius was not only in engineering, but in music as well. His guitar work/solo on "Hitch a ride" is transcendent.
And that sound is just fantastic. Even as a kid listening to Boston I was amazed at how rich and full their guitar sounds are.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
So one guy did Boston? I’m not surprised. It kinda sounds like it 😉
It doesn't sound like the same guy on guitar, bass, keys and drums to me. Sounds like a group of people who've been playing their respective instruments for years. The keyboard solo on Smokin', the Geddy lee-like bass in Piece of Mind, and those ride cymbal 16th note triplets on the Foreplay/Long Time intro . . . . . a virtuoso rock guitar player and Moeller method adept?
 

Griffin

Well-known member
Interesting, and totally believable.
I wouldn’t be surprised if Toto had something to do with every hit album coming out of LA, like the Wrecking Crew before them.
Would not surprise me at all. Those guys sat in on so many recordings it’s ridiculous.
 

TJK

Well-known member
It doesn't sound like the same guy on guitar, bass, keys and drums to me. Sounds like a group of people who've been playing their respective instruments for years. The keyboard solo on Smokin', the Geddy lee-like bass in Piece of Mind, and those ride cymbal 16th note triplets on the Foreplay/Long Time intro . . . . . a virtuoso rock guitar player and Moeller method adept?
And all the keyboards
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I’m reading Steve Lukathers’ book right now and I’m surprised/not surprised by his stories. He even said Gene Simmons stopped playing on KISS records altogether after they became a huge spectacle (which might have been as far back as 1975!). According to Lukather he and his cohorts filled in and played on so many big hit records from the 70s until the 90s, some involving non-disclosure agreements - I wouldn’t be surprised if Toto had something to do with every hit album coming out of LA, like the Wrecking Crew before them.
So one guy did Boston? I’m not surprised. It kinda sounds like it 😉
I had read Allan Schwartzberg played drums on most Kiss stuff, after Kiss Alive, certainly all of Destroyer. The 'code' was no credits and hush hush.
Regarding Boston - I don't think Scholz did any drums on those tracks though right?
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
I had read Allan Schwartzberg played drums on most Kiss stuff, after Kiss Alive, certainly all of Destroyer. The 'code' was no credits and hush hush.
Regarding Boston - I don't think Scholz did any drums on those tracks though right?
There's a kit behind him in what looks like a drum room at :53 seconds. I'm also curious whether he played them or someone else did. He only mentions bringing in Brad Delp to sing.
 
Original drummer Sib Hashian later sued Scholtz for songwriting credits/royalties, but Scholz was able to produce the demos, on which he'd played the drum parts that Hashian later recreated (undoubtedly far better played but essentially the same).

My recollection is that Scholz later took so long on Boston's third album that the record label—Epic—sued him, and withheld royalties, hoping to force him to release the new album. But Scholz had made so much off the Rockman, that he just shrugged. And it turned out Epic needed a new Boston LP more than Scholz needed their royalties, and ultimately he won the suit and switched labels.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Original drummer Sib Hashian later sued Scholtz for songwriting credits/royalties, but Scholz was able to produce the demos, on which he'd played the drum parts that Hashian later recreated (undoubtedly far better played but essentially the same).

My recollection is that Scholz later took so long on Boston's third album that the record label—Epic—sued him, and withheld royalties, hoping to force him to release the new album. But Scholz had made so much off the Rockman, that he just shrugged. And it turned out Epic needed a new Boston LP more than Scholz needed their royalties, and ultimately he won the suit and switched labels.
That must be a great situation to be in for am musician. How cool is that?
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Regarding Boston - I don't think Scholz did any drums on those tracks though right?
Brad Delp: vocals
Sib Hashian: drums
Tom Scholz: everything else

Cool trivia from the liner notes: Polaroid Corp. let Scholz bring home derelict signal processing equipment, with the condition he not resell them. He retooled parts of them for his signature audio effects.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I remember a video interview with Tom Scholtz where Tom says that he sent recordings to many record companies and received three positive responses. There was a time when record companies might talk to musicians.

One cool thing about recording in Tom's basement is that Tom kept possession of the master recordings. That is a more powerful position to be in.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I read Tom Scholz wiki. What a fascinating guy. I'd be willing to bet, of all the stuff he has done/is doing, the title musician is on the bottom of the list. Engineer, inventor, philanthropist, the dude does it all.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
The album Boston:
The album was released in 1976 and became the biggest-selling debut album by any artist up to that time.

In 1976 there was nothing that sounded like that album. The stereophonic effects had never been heard before and were a signature sound of Scholz’ production skills.

I remember the first time I heard it: at my girlfriend’s sister’s home, whose husband rolled a huge blunt, sat me down and said, “Strap in!”
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
The album Boston:
The album was released in 1976 and became the biggest-selling debut album by any artist up to that time.

In 1976 there was nothing that sounded like that album. The stereophonic effects had never been heard before and were a signature sound of Scholz’ production skills.

I remember the first time I heard it: at my girlfriend’s sister’s home, whose husband rolled a huge blunt, sat me down and said, “Strap in!”
That dude can SING. AND mix lol
 

Macarina

Silver Member
Not trying to change bump the flow, but wasn't Jim Steinman when with Meatloaf, similar in being a major force in the that unique sound?
Its been so long, I forget details, but do remember Meatloaf AND Jim Steinman.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
I had read Allan Schwartzberg played drums on most Kiss stuff, after Kiss Alive, certainly all of Destroyer. The 'code' was no credits and hush hush.
I wonder who played bass on Detroit Rock City? I was always suspicious that Simmons actually played that.

Regarding Scholz keeping the demos, that's an amazing piece of justice right there, being able to show concrete proof of something like that. Makes me feel less crazy for saving every email I've ever received. Maybe it will come in handy one day.
 
Jim Steinman and Meatloaf — with the help of producer Todd Rundgren — combined the sound (and sometimes structure) of Broadway show tunes and the then-relatively-new and red-hot Springsteen update of the Phil Spector Wall-of-Sound. (Including using members of the E Street Band.)
 
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