Books on Latin Rhythm

Coldhardsteel

Gold Member
I've recently been learning more and more about the basics of playing latin styles on the drum set, a subject that I've been grossly undereducated on throughout my musical life. So far, I find it a lot of fun particularly from a technical point of view - limb independence is an awesome skill to develop.

My teacher and I recently went over some material in our last lesson, and while I've been scrounging up as much information on the web as I could, a lot of it seems to be ambiguous, or there tends to be a lot of variety in the definition of exactly what is what. This makes it hard to teach myself a lot, and I'm itching for everything!

If anyone has any knowledge they can share about the standards of playing latin - in particular concepts about parts and any iconic ride patterns - then I'd really appreciate it. If there's some sort of masterwork on playing latin drum set out there, then it'd be equally appreciated if someone could point me in the right direction!
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
For Brazilian drumming, I strongly recommend Ed Uribe's book. The Duduka/Weiner book is also a classic, but I have a harder time using it-- the way they format the materials is hard to penetrate. There's also a decent book Sabanovich that has a nice, concise drum set section.

For Afro-Cuban, Uribe's book seems like the book, but it's pretty imposing-- I'm scared to open it half the time. The Malabe/Weiner book is much more manageable, and is probably better for us mortals.
 

Coldhardsteel

Gold Member
I gave both a look and I'm feeling Uribe's book a bit more than the Duduka/Weiner. Thanks for the reference!

Anyone got anything else?
 

eddypierce

Senior Member
For Brazilian drumming, I strongly recommend Ed Uribe's book. The Duduka/Weiner book is also a classic, but I have a harder time using it-- the way they format the materials is hard to penetrate. There's also a decent book Sabanovich that has a nice, concise drum set section.

For Afro-Cuban, Uribe's book seems like the book, but it's pretty imposing-- I'm scared to open it half the time. The Malabe/Weiner book is much more manageable, and is probably better for us mortals.
I agree with everything that Todd said about all of those books. A book that I particularly like is Tito Puente and Jim Payne's Drumming with the Mambo King--it is very accessible and has information on authentic patterns, independence, fills, solos, forms, etc. And it also has a very good audio CD with many Tito recordings on it.
 
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