Bluetooth headphones with electric drums?

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Hi I was wondering about this as I recently got a Roland TD-27KV and found the module has bluetooth capability with it and so I paired my laptop with it to play tracks. I currently also have some Audio-Technica ATH-M20 wired headphones so I thought I'd stick with them at least for now as I think and heard that they are ok. However I think they maybe faulty as I'm only getting sound from one side plus I've had some hearing loss in one ear so need to turn the headphones around making the wire connection even more awkward. I don't think there's a fix from what I've seen so far so I thought about a bluetooth pair once again. I think with my wired headphones there is a newer model as I got the headphones back in 2013.

I checked out some info on bluetooth headphones with electric drums and the concern with them was basically latency length of the drum sounds to the headphones although the info was maybe a couple of years old. I also heard Roland maybe perhaps good enough latency wise but I guess it could also depend on the headphones as well.

What does anyone think? Anything would be greatly appreciated.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
If you would like a wireless headset, I'd consider one using a different transmission technology.
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
If you would like a wireless headset, I'd consider one using a different transmission technology.
So different than bluetooth? I'm sorry about my ignorance, it's not really my kind of area (at least yet) like a lot of other things!
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Use a wire not Bluetooth. How many more times must we say this! :)

If you REALLY have to use wireless (WHY?!) then use analogue.
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Use a wire not Bluetooth. How many more times must we say this! :)

If you REALLY have to use wireless (WHY?!) then use analogue.
Hi again it's kind of what I suspected but I wasn't that sure and am quite new to this stuff!

Just out of interest what would an analogue setup be roughly speaking? I realise yourself and others are probably veterans by now and know a lot about what is what etc but I'm a bit behind that!
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
FM, VHF or UHF - ie. what we used before digital - and what we still use on stage for monitoring and instruments.

.... but stick to wires. You're not running around a stage.
 
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electrodrummer

Senior Member
Ok would that be a setting on a module with some wireless headphones?
Nothing to do with the module. Just analogue RF wireless headphones. Using ye olde analogue FM, VHF or UHF. Same as your radio when you listen to Radio 1 in your car.

Still. Ignore all that stuff. Just use a wire :)
 
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dboomer

Senior Member
Analog has no latency of course. But it is lossy compared to wired or digital. With analog wireless the frequency response changes with level and you end up always running through a compander. So it is always under compression. Digital has no companding and almost zero frequency response loss.

Current digital wireless does add about 2-3ms of latency but bluetooth can add 250ms or more. Funny thing about that. There is some natural latency with drums with no mics or headphones. Your rack tom is a couple of feet from your ears so you get a couple of milliseconds naturally from distance. Now with analog (assuming you are not running through a digital board) there is no latency (well the speed of light) so mic‘d up you’ll actually hear that rack tom earlier with headphones on than you would in nature. Digital brings it about back to natural.
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Nothing to do with the module. Just analogue RF wireless headphones. Using ye olde analogue FM, VHF or UHF. Same as your radio when you listen to Radio 1 in your car.

Still. Ignore all that stuff. Just use a wire :)
Ah ok cool and thanks again. Have you any opinions on any good wired headphone makes / models? With the radio 1 I take it it's different if you're using DAB digital radio?
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Analog has no latency of course. But it is lossy compared to wired or digital. With analog wireless the frequency response changes with level and you end up always running through a compander. So it is always under compression. Digital has no companding and almost zero frequency response loss.

Current digital wireless does add about 2-3ms of latency but bluetooth can add 250ms or more. Funny thing about that. There is some natural latency with drums with no mics or headphones. Your rack tom is a couple of feet from your ears so you get a couple of milliseconds naturally from distance. Now with analog (assuming you are not running through a digital board) there is no latency (well the speed of light) so mic‘d up you’ll actually hear that rack tom earlier with headphones on than you would in nature. Digital brings it about back to natural.
Ok thanks that's pretty technical and interesting. I heard some of those figures with bluetooth latency. I take it bluetooth and digital wireless are different wireless standards I think?
 

Rochelle Rochelle

Senior Member
I have a pair of Sony WH-1000XM3 wireless headphones. I use them wirelessly for watching TV, listening to music, and when I play my acoustic kit to listen to the songs I play along to. The sound quality is great and the noise-canceling feature works well, however, when I play my Roland TD17, I plug the wire into the headphones and into the module as the latency is annoying.
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
I have a pair of Sony WH-1000XM3 wireless headphones. I use them wirelessly for watching TV, listening to music, and when I play my acoustic kit to listen to the songs I play along to. The sound quality is great and the noise-canceling feature works well, however, when I play my Roland TD17, I plug the wire into the headphones and into the module as the latency is annoying.
I heard some stuff along those kinds of lines.
 
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