Big fat snare drum - what's rebound like?

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I just caught word that our church is now using a Big Fat Snare Drum, and it sounds like we really don't have the option of taking it off.

On one hand, I use IEM's and I don't care what it sounds like, but the only thing I'm worried about is stick bounce/rebound because our church does a crap-ton of songs that use a lot of snare rolls.

What's rebound like using it?
 

DrumDoug

Senior Member
If they are using the “regular” one that covers the whole head, there is no rebound. It’s like playing on a completely detuned head. If they insist you use it, then I would purchase the “Steve’s Donut” version. It has a 6” hole in the middle so you get the feel of the head. I can’t tell a difference in the sound. I use the original at church, but take it on and off depending on the song and the snare sound I want. For my other bands I use the donut version so that I have the rebound necessary to play ghost notes and shuffles on the snare.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
I haven't noticed a huge difference between the rebound between the regular and donut version. I prefer the sound of the regular, but like anything, I suppose feel and sound would depend on head, tuning, etc.
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
I haven't noticed a huge difference between the rebound between the regular and donut version. I prefer the sound of the regular, but like anything, I suppose feel and sound would depend on head, tuning, etc.
I agree completely with AzHeat. There isn't a ton of difference between the different versions. If you are concerned, you can actually get away with tuning the batter side head a bit higher, which will give you more rebound. The BFSD on top of your regular head will drop the pitch anyways, so it shouldn't be a big deal.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Rebound aint great on the BFSD without the hole I'll be honest. They're made for a solid back beat thwack, which they do really well.

Trying to buzz roll on one of these is akin to pissing in the wind.

I'd try the trusty wallet or get or and external muffle clamp. BFSD is a one trick pony.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
You mean you’re not allowed to remove it? Aren’t they easy to put on/take off?
Yes, they are easy to remove because they just sit on the head; however, I don't know if I'll be allowed to take if off because our church is quirky about such things.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I don't know if I'll be allowed....
This really irks me...

Who has more authority than you when it comes to the drums you are playing? Not counting the obvious answer :)

You don't like it, remove it, end of story. That's how I'd handle it because I'm the friggin boss of the drums I'm playing. Period.

What's the worst that could happen? I'm tired of hearing about people not doing something they want out of fear of something that has no right being feared.

Do it how YOU want it Martin. You know more about the drums than anyone there, you're the expert.
 
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PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Do it how YOU want it Martin. You know more about the drums than anyone there, you're the expert.
I'm sure you'll be forgiven ;)
Thanks folks! I plan on leaving it on there unless it's a song that requires a lot of rolls. I'm going to talk to them this Sunday and play around with it.

The snare they bought sounds REALLY good, but it's a keller shell. I don't know what your experiences with Keller-shelled snares is, but every single one of them that I've played is really loud. They aren't terribly "warm" no matter how deep the person has made them. I don't blame them at all for getting a BFSD. I'm sure it'll sound good, but I'm curious as to how the rolls will be.

In case anyone is curious, here's the drum tutorial for one of the songs that we do. The rolls start from the get-go.

 

8Mile

Platinum Member
I'm all about being a team player and a supportive member of the ensemble, but putting a BFSD on a snare drum is my choice, not someone else's. The only person who might care is an inexperienced sound guy/gal. Those things pretty much EQ out any frequencies that a sound engineer might have to deal with, so it may make the job easier. But it's still up to you whether it goes on or off.

Also, yeah, the one that covers the entire head makes the feel of the drum terrible. I haven't tried the donut one and wondered if it maybe helps the feel a bit.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
While I've never used the BFSD, I have cut my own out of a cheap APAC made head. The rebound is a tad less than a bare drum, but fully usable. It's certainly easier than the rebound you get with a towel on the drum, so if you practice rudiments with a terrycloth, you'll be in great shape with a BFSD.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I would hate to have to play buzz rolls on a drum like that. Rudimental, not such a problem.
Indeed.

If anyone is curious, here's a quick way to test.

Grab three sheets of paper out of your printer and toss it on your snare (an 8.5x11 rectangle should fit almost exactly into a 7" radius). Try a press/buzz roll. Yeah, it requires more effort than a naked drum. Most notable for me is that I have to change the tempo at which I have to transition to triplets in order to maintain an even-tempered buzz.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
So they're forcing you to play with a BFSD and they make you watch a video to learn how to play the songs?!?? Is literally anything up to the judgement of the drummer (i.e. you)?

I would bail on that gig so fast it'd make their heads spin around like Linda Blair in The Exorcist, so everyone would think that church got "possessed". But that's just me :)
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
So they're forcing you to play with a BFSD and they make you watch a video to learn how to play the songs?!?? Is literally anything up to the judgement of the drummer (i.e. you)?

I would bail on that gig so fast it'd make their heads spin around like Linda Blair in The Exorcist, so everyone would think that church got "possessed". But that's just me :)
First let’s find out how much it pays, and how good the other players are. And maybe if it can open doors to other gigs. Etc.

But I admit, your reaction was my first reaction too. The only person who gets to MAKE me use something like that is another drummer, who knows what they are doing.
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
All you have to do to test the feel is take a old uncoated drum head and put it on top of a snare. That’s really all it is, and I’m sure you have some old heads around
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
So they're forcing you to play with a BFSD and they make you watch a video to learn how to play the songs?!?? Is literally anything up to the judgement of the drummer (i.e. you)?
I don't know if "force" is the right word here. Like I said, I have a rehearsal this Sunday afternoon to try it out. I'll let them know how much of a reality it is or not. As far as the videos go, I try to learn it as closely as possible. I am one of about 3-4 drummers, and have a barrage of different guitar players, keys players, and literally about 20 different singers who hold microphones. All of these folks make up about 3-4 different "teams," so it's normal for me to show up and not really know who's going to be playing or singing. Because of this, we all try to play as consistently as possible. Yeah, I sort of do my own thing in terms of fills and I may alter patterns a little bit, but we have to have consistency or it will fall apart. It's just the nature of the beast. When it comes to the worship team, I'm just a follower. I don't give my opinions, and I don't give any push-back of anything at all. I just show up, play my notes and I leave. My family is on stage participating, and I enjoy doing this with them. If it were not for them, I'd have quit a year ago. I just like that time together.

First let’s find out how much it pays, and how good the other players are. And maybe if it can open doors to other gigs. Etc.

But I admit, your reaction was my first reaction too. The only person who gets to MAKE me use something like that is another drummer, who knows what they are doing.
Pay? You're cute. :) I volunteer. As a matter of fact, I've never gotten paid to play worship music, and I've been doing it for almost 25 years now. Maybe I'm a sucker. Maybe I'm not. Who knows. I get paid to play bars, breweries, wineries, and festivals on the weekends, so it makes not getting paid at church not as bad.

The other players are decent.

I've never gotten another gig from playing at church. I guess there is a list of reasons:

1. The majority of "bands" around here play bluegrass.
2. Church musicians who exclusively play at church will always, always, always be considered sub-par. I know this has changed in other parts of the country, but by the time that thought gets here, I'm pretty sure I'll be in the ground.
3. The few bands that are around here already have their members together. I play in two band consistently and fill in with another from time to time. I stay plenty busy.

Thanks to everyone who has taken time to reply.

Usually people want me to come play at their church, but I like where I am. And those other churches aren't going to pay me either. Around here, getting paid to play at a church is a very, very foreign concept.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
I don't know if "force" is the right word here. Like I said, I have a rehearsal this Sunday afternoon to try it out. I'll let them know how much of a reality it is or not. As far as the videos go, I try to learn it as closely as possible. I am one of about 3-4 drummers, and have a barrage of different guitar players, keys players, and literally about 20 different singers who hold microphones. All of these folks make up about 3-4 different "teams," so it's normal for me to show up and not really know who's going to be playing or singing. Because of this, we all try to play as consistently as possible. Yeah, I sort of do my own thing in terms of fills and I may alter patterns a little bit, but we have to have consistency or it will fall apart. It's just the nature of the beast. When it comes to the worship team, I'm just a follower. I don't give my opinions, and I don't give any push-back of anything at all. I just show up, play my notes and I leave. My family is on stage participating, and I enjoy doing this with them. If it were not for them, I'd have quit a year ago. I just like that time together.
"it sounds like we really don't have the option of taking it off" sounds pretty much to me like you're being forced to use it. If it doesn't bother you, that's fine. But it would bother me. And while I generally don't like being told (or shown) what to play—just give me the music and let me figure it out—it does make sense in your situation, now that I understand how it works with multiple groups of musicians. Hopefully they won't give you too much crap if you decide to take off the BFSD.
 
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