Best travel kit recommendations

Peedy

Senior Member
. . . . Anyone got any recommendations?
I guess issue one is cost. How much do you want to spend? If money were no object and I needed a small gig kit it would probably be a used Sonor Prolite. Should cost about 1500 pounds.

They're durable, lightweight (as the name implies) and they can played with great effect either subtly or powerfully as your needs dictate IMHO.

On the other hand, if you just want something that's reasonably priced, sounds decent and is easy to move around I'd just get a good used Pearl (Oops) kit for 300 or so pounds sterling.

Pete
 
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mikyok

Platinum Member
Possibly but it's valid too. Just to clarify, my initial anecdote and last post were certainly intended more as tongue in cheek banter with the OP rather than a concrete solution to his particular issue.
Funnily enough I did get one of those 25m extensions. It's well handy for the garden.

I can run the tumble dryer from the shed.

Happy days!
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I guess issue one is cost. How much do you want to spend? If money were no object and I needed a small gig kit it would probably be a used Sonor Prolite. Should cost about 1500 pounds.

They're durable, lightweight (as the name implies) and they can played with great effect either subtly or powerfully as your needs dictate IMHO.

On the other hand, if you just want something that's reasonably priced, sounds decent and is easy to move around I'd just get a good used Pearl (Oops) kit for 300 or so pounds sterling.

Pete
I've had a butchers at a few kits in PMT in Brum over the weekend. The DW frequent flyer is nice and I'm tempted for the price.

They had a gorgeous Ludwig downbeat in WMP but that was £2300. You can buy a 60s one in good nick for £1500.

They had the breakbeats kit in but it looked a bit cheap compared to the dw.

I can't think of anywhere local that sells Sonor off the top of my head.
 

lsits

Gold Member
I typed "Brian Powers" into my search engine and couldn't come up with anything relating to this discussion. Could someone please point me in the right direction? My best guess is that he is one of those "96 decibel freaks" that Ian Hunter wrote about in "The Golden age of Rock and Roll".
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I typed "Brian Powers" into my search engine and couldn't come up with anything relating to this discussion. Could someone please point me in the right direction? My best guess is that he is one of those "96 decibel freaks" that Ian Hunter wrote about in "The Golden age of Rock and Roll".
If you try Brian Potter Phoenix Nights, that's the character we're on about.

It was a comedy series in England filmed about 15 years ago about a working mens club. I'll guarantee 99.9% of Americans won't get the humour at all. You had to live it to get it :)

Potter could be one of the 96db brigade but he had a scant disregard for health and safety.
 

thebarak

Senior Member
Some of these small kits are as loud as much larger shell sizes. The DW Mini-Pro and Frequent Flyer are good examples of that. Maple shells, 45 degree edges, etc. Also some of these 16" bass drums are surprisingly loud also.

You should first hide your wallet and work with the kit you have. Light sticks, controlled playing, maybe some Diplomat heads or similar. You can half the volume doing such things and get your money with less sweat. If there are no rolls in the set, you can use those crazy rod bundles as sticks.

If you never play press rolls, rim shots, cross stick, cymbal rubs, brushed ballads, etc. all around the kit, then nothing wrong with using e-drums in a club that has a volume limiter. Those places expect rock and pop so you can play all that stuff on e-drums, and then you just turn it down.

It takes courage and attitude to take e-drums to a gig and you can expect some disapproval and even hostility from your bandmates and some of the crowd. But they are the perfect tool for such a venue.

If there is a limiter, it's not your gig, and you are not the artist. You are working a job with rules. Comply, take the money, and have fun.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Some of these small kits are as loud as much larger shell sizes. The DW Mini-Pro and Frequent Flyer are good examples of that. Maple shells, 45 degree edges, etc. Also some of these 16" bass drums are surprisingly loud also.

You should first hide your wallet and work with the kit you have. Light sticks, controlled playing, maybe some Diplomat heads or similar. You can half the volume doing such things and get your money with less sweat. If there are no rolls in the set, you can use those crazy rod bundles as sticks.

If you never play press rolls, rim shots, cross stick, cymbal rubs, brushed ballads, etc. all around the kit, then nothing wrong with using e-drums in a club that has a volume limiter. Those places expect rock and pop so you can play all that stuff on e-drums, and then you just turn it down.

It takes courage and attitude to take e-drums to a gig and you can expect some disapproval and even hostility from your bandmates and some of the crowd. But they are the perfect tool for such a venue.

If there is a limiter, it's not your gig, and you are not the artist. You are working a job with rules. Comply, take the money, and have fun.
I have toothpicks in my stick bag and have played that quiet I might as well not be there and that looks like where I'll stay after trying the frequent flyer and the breakbeats. E-drums are more expensive than a proper kit. Plus if I turned down as quiet as some of these gigs go you'd here the pad noises and I'm not a big hitter.

The main issue is that venues don't explain to clients that there is a limiter which in most cases means the venue is not suitable to book a wedding band or even a dj but are more than happy to charge them a fortune for it and let you take the blame for everything being too quiet. (That's where the fun element goes out the window!) I've even found DJ forums which have venues to avoid because of limiters.

I'm in total agreement about the little kits not being quiet at all. I might get away with something if the noise limiter was sensitive to bass frequencies (again you're playing a guessing game!). The frequent flyer is a very practical kit for what I do.
 

lsits

Gold Member
If you try Brian Potter Phoenix Nights, that's the character we're on about.

It was a comedy series in England filmed about 15 years ago about a working mens club. I'll guarantee 99.9% of Americans won't get the humour at all. You had to live it to get it :)

Potter could be one of the 96db brigade but he had a scant disregard for health and safety.
I watched about 15 minutes of an episode and you're right. it was difficult for me to follow. I enjoy a lot of British humour, Monty Python, Benny Hill, Dave Allen, Marty Feldman, etc, but I guess I was having a hard time following the Cockney dialog. At least they wern't Scottsmen. :)
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I watched about 15 minutes of an episode and you're right. it was difficult for me to follow. I enjoy a lot of British humour, Monty Python, Benny Hill, Dave Allen, Marty Feldman, etc, but I guess I was having a hard time following the Cockney dialog. At least they wern't Scottsmen. :)
That's not Cockney, you're about 250 miles out. Opposite sides of out crappy little island :)

We don't understand each others accents at the best of times trust me. I'd love to see you try and decipher Geordie.

I can only hate the Scots when it comes to sport but the feeling is mutual I'm sure. Billy Connolly is one of the funniest comedians I've ever seen but he's pretty big both sides of the Atlantic.

P.S. Dave Allen was Irish. For your own health never call an Irishman British!
 

ComaDrum

Junior Member
Didn't realise Odery made a mini kit. If the quality is anything like the Odery Privilege I got last week it's a bargain!

I can see a new kit in my future......
 

Tamaefx

Silver Member
Question: are you wanting a small kit so you can fit into the venue or so you can be quiet? I'm sure the usual answer would be "both", but if size is not the issue, I'd rather play softer with the drums I have. I play a mundane 4 or 5-piece in the usual 12/13/16/22 or 13/16/22 configurations and I've never had a problem playing under the crowd, plus, they actually sound like full drums. Most times I am more felt than heard, and only bigger drums enable that. Little tiny drums just sound like they're being punched all the time, and their sound disappears when you try to play underneath because there's not enough mass.

This is why I no longer play tiny kits.
I'm totally on it. Having smaller shells may help, but in most cases, the volume problem will anyway come from your snare, your hat and crashes. It will never come from your bass drum or 12" Tom. I have played the situation, I played my standard 22 12 14 and I did put stuff to quieten down the snare and cymbals mainly. The element i wasn't expecting to be trouble was : the cowbell !!
So in that situation : I stuff more the Bass drum, coated heads, moon gel everywhere, on the ride cymbal too, bigger felts on the crashes and most of all, much quieter strokes (and lighter sticks) and less notes and accents. And that way, the kit doesn't sound or look like a toy.

To my ears, higher pitched drums are more aggressive to the hear in small venues. For instance, in live situation, high pitched Tom of Superstar Hyperdrive were cutting much more than standard toms.
 
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Session Elite

Junior Member
I own the Sakae Pac-D and I absolutely love it. I build in internal mics and play my gigs with it. The edges are smooth, the drums sound amazing and the bass drum, after getting the right head, messing around with different tunings and installing a felt strip against the batter and reso sounds like a full-blown 20" kick. The cradle is out of this world, solid and fully adjustable in height, width, etc. I can recommend this to anyone without a doubt, that is if you can find one, they are hard to come by.
 
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RickP

Gold Member
Whitney Nesting Penguin kit would be my suggestion. By far the best nesting kit made today ( and I have owned them all). They sound fantastic, Uber lightweight and the quickframe mounting rack is genius. You can easily get in the door in one trip .
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
One back from the dead here.

Man how times change, since I posted this I've bought a Pearl Midtown, loved it, gigged it for a year, sold it and upgraded to a Saturn V in downbeat sizes.

Even got a yamaha dd65 to do gigs where you can't even get a kit of any type in and upgraded the pedals.
 
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